Wappygixer

Budding Enthusiast
  • Content count

    70
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About Wappygixer

  • Rank
    Mark

Contact Methods

  • First Name
    Mark

Profile Information

  • Gender*
    Male
  • Ford Model
    Mondeo MK4 Titanium 2.0 TDCI
  • Ford Year
    2009
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Cheshire
  • Annual Mileage
    10,001 to 15,000
  1. I had this on my old MK3 Mondeo. It turned out to be a loose connector on the wiring loom that had come out of the connector block. Popped it back in and problems solved. The connector was in the door itself.
  2. I replaced mine about 6 weeks ago just as the car was set to reach 100k miles . Pig of a job to do, not much went right either. I replaced with OE quality parts from LUK and FTE for the CSC. I think I paid £380 for the DMF, clutch plate and CSC. I opted for quality parts as the cost of cheaper vs the time to do the job just wasnt worth the saving.
  3. The worst part for me was the clamp for the cat to the turbo. Took me and age to get off and and age to get back on. In the end I used a bolt with a couple of nuts to pull it apart enough to get back on. Not much room at the back of the engine
  4. Yep that subframe weighs quite alot, especially when trying to put it back up on your own. I was lucky enough to get some help with the gearbox though. I don't think I could have managed that on my own.
  5. Just finished and emergency change of mt DMF and clutch. I knew it was starting to go but thought I would and 2-3 months before it would realisticaly need doing giving me warmer and longer days in which to do it. How wrong was I. It went within 4 weeks and it went big time. The vibration felt through the clutch pedal was unreal. So I bit the bullet and ordered all of the parts required. DMF, clutch kit and CSC all made by LUK. I replaced the same parts in my old MK3 in a day and it went quite smoothly. The MK4 had other ideas. The clamp that secures the cat to the turbo was seized and needed cutting off, the centre section of the exhaust mounts were also corroded and needed cutting off (didn't actually need removing but I did it as it made it easier for me) and the gearbox bolt next to the cat and turbo unit snapped whilst removing, and to top it off the track rod ends were seized as well so got cut off and replaced I opted to remove the subframe completely and I wanted to remove the gearbox to replace the CSC and I also had to drill out and re-tap the broken bolt. All in all it taken just over 2 days to do on the road side but its done and what a difference it's made. Had the tracking done this morning and it's all sweet.It was certainly a test I'll not want to repeat in a hurry but now it's done I feel a huge sence of acheivment. If I could have afforded £1200 the garage wanted I would probably have paid them to do it but I didn't. I have now saved about £800 in labour. Mo doubt if I had a drive and or garage it would have been a bit easier. To anyone who has done this before or is about to attempt it I salute you for your efforts
  6. Cheers for that. Just need a nice day now
  7. I'm pretty sure my DMF is on its way out and in need on replacement. I replaced this myself on my old MK3 but I've decided to invest in an engine support beam on my MK4 this time to make things easier. The only problem is there doesn't seem to be somewhere straight forward to rest it on. The inner wings have a couple of plastic covers that can be removed (just down from the supsension mounts towards the headlights) is this where the support beam would rest? Thanks for any guidance
  8. I've got a 2009 MK4 Mondeo TDCI. The heater if set to come out of the dash vents (where is blows at you) is cooler than if set to either footwell of the windscreen. I've run the onboard diagnostic and nothing comes back. The temperature guage is operating at normal temperature. I do find the temperature setting needs to be set higher than it did in my 2005 MK3. Anyone got any ideas?
  9. I had to replace the fan on my old mk3 as it had failed. Mine had the fan that was hard wired to the control box and expensive to buy. I bought an older style fan and fan surround and wired it in and it worked perfectly. Mine was a 2.0 tdci
  10. My mrs Firsta tdci had the same symptoms regarding fumes in the cabin. It was an injector seal. Dead easy to spot. Open the bonnet, remove the black cover on top of the engine, if an injector is leaking into the engine bay you will see dampness around the base of the injector body. It's a pretty easy fix and quite cheap. It cost £20 to do all 4 injectors on the Fiesta (that was doing it myself). What ever the cause is though you may also want to replace the cabin filter as it will be tainted with fuel fumes.
  11. I though I would share my thoughts on removing the EGR from a mk4 Mondeo. Unfortunately due to stress levels I never took and photos. The EGR is at the back of the engine on the top. 4 bolts are easy to see and remove, 2 of the bolts fix the EGR to the engine block and the other 2 bolt the EGR to the EGR cooler. There are 5 other bolts you need to remove as well. These are for the metal pipe that goes from the EGR to the inlet manifold, 2 at either end and 1 bolt that secures this metal pipe to the side of the engine. The one bolt I couldn't find was underneath the EGR itself. You cant see it at all. I ended up going out to buy one of those dentist style mirrors which helped no end. This last bolt is an allen bolt that requires a 5mm allen key, the allen key needs cutting down somewhat in order to fit as space is very limited. Once this bolt is loosened (you dont need to remove it) the EGR can be removed by sliding it back towards the windscreen area. This whole precess took be about 2 hours plus to figure out and then about 10 minutes to put back together. After all of this my EGR was nothing like I was expecting. My car has covered 80,000 miles and it was clean, a bit of soot but other wise there was nothing. My MK3 was caked at this mileage and to the point that you could scrape it out. It seems the MK4 runs muh cleaner. I certainly wont bother removing it again unless it is to replace it. I was hoping this was the cause of my poor fuel economy but it now seems it's my MAF sensor but a full diagnostic on Tuesday will confirm this for sure. I'm working for the next few days but if I get a few spare minutes I'll take some pictures that might help others out and save you time trying to figure out how it comes apart (Haynes manual was next to useless)
  12. I have a 2.0 tdci mk4 I removed the egr from mine and it really wasn't worth it as its a pain to do. All it had a a small trace of soot. Nothing like I had on the old mk3. If you do decide to undertake it then you will need to cut down a 5mm allen key. The bolt you'll need this for is underneath the egr and out of sight. This is all assuming the 2.2 is of a similar layout to the 2.0
  13. It could be worth taking the car for a diagnostic update. My engine had a very metallic clunking which I really thought was the DMF going. The sensor that needed the software update to re-calibrate it was actually the cause. If you want to be doubly sure you can remove the starter motor and if it has metal filings on it it can be a sign the DMF is on its way out. I've no longer got my MK3 but I sold it to someone I know and it's still going strong
  14. Rocco was the Fiat branded EGR much cheaper than buying genuine Ford? I did an ECU reset after I'd cleaned mine, it didn't make much difference really. My next job is to remove the inlet manifold and clean it. First I need to order 4 new rubber O'ring seals. I did this same job on my Mrs 2009 Fiesta 1.4 TDCI and the inlet manifolds can be difficult to get back on as the seals are so tight, it does require some lube and lots of pressure. I was so surprised at how clean my EGR was, the soot it had in it was only about the same as that found in the end of the exhaust. I'm wondering if it hasn't been working fully due to a possible faulty MAF sensor? I'll find out for sure on Tuesday. Good luck doing your motor and if you need any help just yell.
  15. I though I would share my thoughts on removing the EGR from a mk4 Mondeo. Unfortunately due to stress levels I never took and photos. The EGR is at the back of the engine on the top. 4 bolts are easy to see and remove, 2 of the bolts fix the EGR to the engine block and the other 2 bolt the EGR to the EGR cooler. There are 5 other bolts you need to remove as well. These are for the metal pipe that goes from the EGR to the inlet manifold, 2 at either end and 1 bolt that secures this metal pipe to the side of the engine. The one bolt I couldn't find was underneath the EGR itself. You cant see it at all. I ended up going out to buy one of those dentist style mirrors which helped no end. This last bolt is an allen bolt that requires a 5mm allen key, the allen key needs cutting down somewhat in order to fit as space is very limited. Once this bolt is loosened (you dont need to remove it) the EGR can be removed by sliding it back towards the windscreen area. This whole precess took be about 2 hours plus to figure out and then about 10 minutes to put back together. After all of this my EGR was nothing like I was expecting. My car has covered 80,000 miles and it was clean, a bit of soot but other wise there was nothing. My MK3 was caked at this mileage and to the point that you could scrape it out. It seems the MK4 runs muh cleaner. I certainly wont bother removing it again unless it is to replace it. I was hoping this was the cause of my poor fuel economy but it now seems it's my MAF sensor but a full diagnostic on Tuesday will confirm this for sure. I'm working for the next few days but if I get a few spare minutes I'll take some pictures that might help others out and save you time trying to figure out how it comes apart (Haynes manual was next to useless)