NewHouse

Budding Enthusiast
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About NewHouse

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  • Ford Model
    2009 Focus Zetec 1.6 TDI
  1. Extra padding inside the boot space won't be a moisture problem. What surprised me is that the dirt that had worked its way inside was dry so it was blown there. There were no signs of water stains or runs. I don't particularly want to take the panels off again so, apologies no pix. This gap is definitely not a vent but the overlapping flange seam of the two halves of the wheel arch. Which is spot welded and sealed with gunk up to where the seatbelt bracket is welded on but left unsealed underneath the bracket. My thought was that this 3" section would be difficult to get a robotic arm in so it is always left, which is as you say a bit weird or it was the workers tea-break when it was my car's turn to be done.
  2. I believe they are probably one of the top ten causes of motor accidents because drivers are distracted as they crane and stretch, while trying to locate the offending noise. My experience to date is that most rattles and squeaks are either caused by poor build quality, lack of maintenance of rubber seals or the left overs from a car phone engineer when you have a hands free kit installed. My hunt for rattles to date, having avoided a few collisions on the way and with assistance from a fellow hater of squeaks has been... A persistent tinny rattle in the passenger footwell which turned out to be a cheap ball point pen left underneath the centre console as a present from an auto engineer. I had to remove the side panel of the console to find it so it couldnt have been dropped in there by a passenger. A clunking sound when going over bumps that appeared to be coming from the front firewall from beneath the dashboard (I first thought was suspension needing attention). Turned out to be nothing more than the two adjustable screw-in rubber bonnet closure stops requiring a smear of silicone grease. A rattle that appeared to be coming from inside the drivers door, again dry rubber door seals requiring a spray of silicon lubricant. And it is so satisfying when you nail a squeak :)
  3. Apologies, I started this thread and then left it unvisited for a couple of weeks. The noise in the rear of my focus, which you are all describing was coming from an open (unsealed) flange joint inside the boot at the top the both rear wheel arches beneath the open bracket that holds the rear seat belt mechanism. It was obvious the rear of the car was open to the outside behind the plastic trims as both of the wheel arches were covered in a trail of road dust and fine gravel leading to the flange joint. From the outside you can’t see or get access to the offending flange because the top of the rear shock absorber is in the way. Anyway, to remove the shock absorber you have to remove the inside trims. To gain access to this area the trims next to the side window, rear seat, on top of the seatbelt entry point, above the rear wheel arches and the piece of carpet on the side of the boot well all have to come out. From memory the first trim to be removed is the window trim above the rear seat which is held in by a concealed screw. Prize the cover off with a small screwdriver remove the screw and pull. The seat side pieces are next held in each side with two push through clips and two behind trim clips. You just need a little courage and pull them carefully out. The rest of the trims come out the same way and I managed it with not even a broken clip. Once I had sealed the open flange joint I set about deadening any panel I could get access to with 225mm Flashing tape I purchased for £15 from Screwfix, a fraction of the cost of the proper stuff but nearly as good. I also purchased an off cut of heavy underlay, the reconstituted multicoloured foam type and glued pieces over the flashing tape, behind the boot carpet and any other exposed panels using carpet spray adhesive. One other thing I did to reduce a lot of the road noise from the boot area was to glue a layer of carpet felt underneath the parcel tray and then cover it with black felt to hide the unsightly underlay, again glued in place The overall difference is quite noticeable and well worth doing.
  4. Just did a trawl on the Internet for 'Focus Speed Sensor'. There are many others with similar problems/symptoms. It would appear that the speed sensor and it’s electrical connections are prone to the occasional failure. Read:- My link
  5. Just out of interest - Do you have any problems with your speedometer? If so worth getting your road speed and possibly your clutch pedal sensors checked Also, any faults reported by the EMU? The engine management system should increases the idle speed slightly if you if you declutch whist moving. When you pull to a stop with the clutch still depressed the idling speed should return to normal. Modern engines cut off fuel under normal overrun, using the engine to slow you down to save fuel. However, if you were to declutch with the fuel flow cut off the engine would stall or exhibit your symptoms. To prevent this happening the management system should restore fuel flow to the engine and raise the revs slightly when you declutch and/or the revs or speed are at certain limits. This doesnt appear to be the case with your car. Hopefully a simple fix.
  6. There is very little good information on the DPF fitted to the later Foci. The hand book makes no mention of the DPF requiring additives or a service, it just states that the DPF is self-regenerating and don't park over dry leaves. I was told by the 'trusty' main dealer that the new DPFs are good for at least 80k of normal driving. The plan in the back of my mind is to have it bypassed and the engine management modified at some time in the future.
  7. Further to my post on compatibility of Space saver wheels another 'TOP TIP'. If you have a recent Focus with less than 26K on the clock there is a very good chance the rear wheels have never been taken off the car, as with mine. When tying out the fit of the above spacesaver wheel I found that the rear wheels wouldn’t come off the stub axles. Electrolytic corrosion between the iron hub and the alloy wheel had bonded them firmly in place. It took a hefty piece of wood, a lump hammer and a lot of elbow grease underneath the car to knock them off. Not something you could do on the hard shoulder of the motorway. It is normal to apply a smear of grease around the centre boss and the flat surfaces between the hub and wheel to prevent this happening. Mine were dry, hence the problem. So, worth taking them off to have a look before you have to do it in anger.
  8. Just used my first tank full on my newly acquired 1.6tdi 110 (58) plate 2009 Focus. It has 26k on the clock and is fitted with Michelin eco tyres. I got a recorded 660 miles and I squeezed £60 into the tank @ 133p a Ltr. That’s 45.1 Ltrs. = 9.9 Gallons = 66.6 miles to the gallon. I’m very pleased with the economy and the performance of the new tdi engine and with Road Fund License at only £30.00 a year... does motoring get any cheaper?
  9. As promised, I can confirm that a Jaguar x type spacesaver spare fits a Mk111 focus and for that mater a Mondeo with a five stud wheel. Pictur of wheel on rear stub axle. Note the studs and center boss are a perfect fit.
  10. Further to my post on on Steel wheel compatibility. A Top Tip. According to the sizing data on www.alloywheels.com there are a number of makes and models with very similar wheel specifications to a Focus. The Jaguar X Type spacesaver wheel and tyre has an identical spec to thoes fitted on a Mondeo or Focus. I just bought a Jag one off eBay for £12.50 for my 09 Focus. Spacesavers advertised as Focus wheels go for 4 times that on eBay to meet the demand for the newer Ford cars equipped with only an Aerosol Puncture Repair kit. I'll report back when i have tried it
  11. I have also looked for theses elusive foot well lamp holders in my 2009 Zetec 1.6 TDI and, alas just an empty bracket with no holder or wires. Obviously Ford left them out as a weight saving so they could scrape under the £30 a year road fund tax. Would be useful to know the colours of the wires feeding the lamp holder. If one of you lucky ones with a pre-wired holder could take a look it would be worth poking around to see if there are a couple of spares tucked away in an adjacent loom.
  12. Being able to swap wheels between one manufacturer and another or even between different models of the same make is not always straight forward. It's not only the number of studs but where they are in relation to one another. For instance the old Probe five stud wheels won’t fit a Mondeo. You also have to consider the position of the wheel relative to the hub (offset) and the size of the hole in the middle of the wheel which centres the wheel on the axle before you tighten the wheel nuts. However, www.alloywheels.comlists the wheel data for all the ford models. So, at a glance you can see which ones should be compatible with your car
  13. I recently bought a 2009 Focus 1.6 TDI. Very pleased with the car and love the economy. Driving Miss Daisy on a trip to the Cotswolds on the week-end averaged just over 78MPG. However, passengers in the rear complained that there was a distinct noise coming from the boot from between the rear doors and rear seats that sounded like the door was ajar or the window wasn’t sealing properly. Finding nothing wrong with the door seals and windows I removed the rear plastic trims from one side and found that the space behind had a lot of grit and dust. It was coming from a 5mm gap in a panel seam at the top of the rear wheel arch beneath the rear seatbelt pillar. It would appear that the gap is open to the underside of the car allowing noise and dirt into the cabin. Both sides were the same. I filled the gap with silicon and as Ford are not generous on sound proofing their cars I applied extra sound insulation and flashing tape to any bare panels. Problem solved. Anyone else had a similar experience?