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Thoric

Budding Enthusiast
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About Thoric

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  • Ford Model Focus 2.0 Ghia 'Y'
  1. Focus Car Alarm gone Potty!

    Well, after a long time searching and cursing, I found the alarm horn - and boy do I feel stupid! It should have been so easy to find, I can't believe it took me so long! Anyways, I've disconnected that, so now I have a faulty alarm that can't make any noise. One step better at least. Then I started test door sensors etc, to try to find the faulty one (I'm presuming there's a faulty sensor). Eventually, my suspicions fall to the bonnet catch. This thing seems tetchy. So I disconnect the plug and short it with a piece of wire. This time, after arming the alarm and waiting - nothing happens. So in the end I've left the plug shorted out and cable-tied up out of the way. This does mean my bonnet is unprotected, but no thief is going to try the bonnet first are they? So far so good. The alarm has been armed for 5 hours and it hasn't gone off. Yet. If it stays ok for a few days, I'll reconnect the alarm horn. That way my alarm will be 90% functional, which is better than off! (I found out from somewhere that if you press a door light sensor six times in eight seconds, it puts the alarm system into a door check mode. Not sure about how you're supposed to use that to your advantage, but someone might find that snippet of info useful if they read this post in the future and want to test a door or boot sensor) Cheers everyone.
  2. Focus Car Alarm gone Potty!

    Thanks for the advise but I simply can't afford that. No matter how cheap :( I've tracked (through the sound of the alarm) the noise down to somewhere over the left rear wheel arch. So I've stripped out the boot trim right back to the metalwork. I can see plenty of wires, but no 'brains' or horn anywhere. So I've jacked her up, removed the wheel and the dirt guard, but there's nothing up inside there but solid metal. Somewhere between these outside and inside skins is the horn - but it all seems to be welded up! I wonder if it's not possible to get to it? I only want to disconnect the horn so that it can't make any noise in the middle of the night if it decides to randomly go off :( Has anyone got information on the wire colours for the alarm - if the wires I've found go to the horn I could cut them!?
  3. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    Thanks! But now I've got another problem :( Link to new thread - you have any ideas on this one mate?
  4. I'm back, having just fixed my ICV. I've now got another issue - the car alarm. I've noticed this a few times before - that is, whenever I've had to disconnect the battery, the alarm goes potty for the next few days. The last time I did this (to change the alternator) the alarm would sound for no reason. At the time I suspected the bonnet switch/sensor. Eventually, the alarm stopped going off for no reason and all was well. Today I fixed my ICV, and now it's happening again. Except this time it's much worse. Now the alarm 'pips', even when the car is unlocked and the alarm is deactivated! If I leave the car unlocked, after about 5 to 10 minutes it starts 'pipping'. By pipping I mean the alarm horn sounds very very briefly, about 4 times a second, for about 2 seconds. Like a rapid series of gentle taps on the horn. The indicator lights flash too, so I know this isn't a 'car horn' problem, but an alarm problem. I took the car out for a 20 mile 'warm up', and reset my audio lock and re-programmed the electric windows, as you're meant to do, and on the road the car was fine. But as soon as I got back this happened: I locked the car up and waited within a minute the alarm sounded I used the keyfob to unlock the car the alarm stopped sounding, but the pipping thing started up almost immediately I got in and started the engine - the pipping continued I drove the car a few hundred yards - the pipping got worse I stopped the engine and got out - the pipping stopped. My car now sits with the battery disconnected again I see only a few options (for someone with too little cash to have an engineer look at it) : Disconnect the car alarm so that it can't do this Disconnect the horn, so the alarm can't sound (only flash) Disconnet the battery each time I park up (can you imagine that in Tescos carpark?) Set fire to the car Anyone have any advice please? Would the alarm system be easy to disconnect? Would that even work? I think the alarm's horn is different to the 'in car' horn, so could I just find the alarm's horn and unplug it? I know the lights would still flash, but if it righted itself in a few days then I'm sure the neighbours wouldn't care about a few nights of occasionally flashing lights
  5. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    :D Wahhay! Fantastic! Woohoo! :D (childish moment over) As you may have guessed - I've fixed it! And it's all thanks to you lot! Thank you for the advice and encouragement! In the end, I cleaned out my ICV. To get to it I followed the instructions of a Haynes manual, as kindly provided by a member of this forum, and removed my alternator. In the end though you can just about get to it (on the 2.0 litre model this is) from the right hand side of the inlet manifold and from underneath. Takes a bit of reaching but it goes! I re-used the old seals (because I don't have access to a new one in a hurry) and it's running smooth now! As a matter of interest, I borrowed something from work called Flux Off that's an evaporative grease remover. It took a hell of a lot of gunk out of it. Then I used long nosed pliers to move the seal up and down a few times to be sure it was free. Then another clean, then blasted it with compressed air (from another can) to dry it out. Put it all back together and, voila - one working engine! ...and yet I still don't know what the damn thing does! :o Cheers again to everyone! Especially stef123! FordOwnersClub rules!
  6. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    About 400 miles from Scotland :D
  7. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    Hi stef! yes, it's me again! I replaced the vacuum hose last time and the problem went away for a while, but as it's back I was hoping it was something else, like the lambda sensor. That might have been easier to replace! :P I've just checked and I still have your original PMs, so thank you again for the info you sent me! I'll just have to bite the bullet and strip that ICV. It may not seem like a big deal to most of you hardened petrolheads, but I'm pretty new to something this involved and really hope I don't screw up my engine permanently! Thanks to everyone who's advised me, if I'm on here on Monday then presume it all went well. If before, I'm in trouble! :D
  8. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    Thanks for the advice stef123, I have replaced my alternator before so that's not too alien to me. I still don't know where this ICV is (other than that it's behind the inlet manifold), so I guess I need to do some more research. Anyone got any good links for websites with info (pics) showing things like this? Oh yesah, will I need any replacement gaskets to do this? If so I'll need to get to a autospares shop before I strip the intake down because I'll have no transport options available to me once I do!
  9. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    Well - I've taken a look at a Ford Technical Information System CD and it would seem one needs to de-pressurise the fuel system!? Or am I taking too much off my engine!? :o You see, it says nothing about a Inlet Control Valve, but it does talk about an Intake Manifold, and throttle body. Are these the same things? I really am beginning to think I'm outta my depth :(
  10. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    That's a good idea - I do have cover. So projecting forward. If this is the ICV, what am I looking at here? Dismantling the intake assembly? Cleaning and rebuilding, or new parts? I've not worked on an ICV before. Although I'm not averse to working on my car, this would be new to me. The most I've done before is replace the alternator, brake pads, wheel bearing etc. Is this possibly out of my depth?
  11. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    OK, thank you for your input :)
  12. Is my lambda sensor to blame?

    Thanks FiestaMan and Mintalkin, I take it I need more advice from someone who can check out my engine with one of those OBD2 reader thingumajigs? I don't know anyone unfortunately, and I just know Ford will charge around £80 Bit skint so I was hoping I'd diagnosed it correctly and could confidently fix it myself (least cost that way), but I wonder if I'll just have to face up to the fact I'm gonna need a professional. Bummer :(
  13. Hi all, I'm a Ford Focus 2001 2.0l pertrol owner, and have been suffering from a worsening problem recently. I've been reading up and I'm beginning to think my lambda/oxygen sensor might be to blame - but I'd thought I'd ask everyone's opinion before I go out and buy a replacement! The problem is that the engine has been stalling/rough idling. When I start the engine, it doesn't hold idle and just stalls immediately. I've learned to lightly press the accelerator to keep it at around 800 revs, and wait until it sorts itself out. This used to take no more than a few seconds, and all would be sweet for the rest of the day. But now I'm finding it takes anywhere between 10 seconds and over an hour to put itself right! I've learned to left-foot brake recently as I just cannot let myself take my right-foot off the accelerator for fear of a stalling engine. The curious thing is what the engine does right when it sorts itself out: What it does is give a sudden burst of power, and then all is fine for the rest of the day! For example, I was once driving home, had been on the road about 25 minutes, and was cruising at 65 mph along the M11. Without moving my right-foot I suddenly got this burst of speed, taking me up to 70 in a few seconds! It then quick righted itself and I was able to drive normally from then on (no more left-foot braking at roundabouts etc.!) So the clues I have are these: Once the engine rights itself, it will be fine until it's completely cooled down (several hours later) But the problem's not entirely temperature related, because I can drive for an hour and it won't necessarily of sorted itself out It can sometimes be ok within seconds of starting the engine from cold, or not sort itself out all day I was once told it might be a vacuum pipe to the inlet, but this hasn't fixed it I've read that a faulty lambda sensor can cause a lean mix - which I presume can cause a cold engine to stall? Or a warm engine to rough idle? Does anyone have any insightful advice or experience of these symptoms? If it is a lambda sensor, any idea if it's the pre- or post-catalyst sensor? (I believe there are two, right?) (Can I inspect them to find out?) Any advice will be greatly appreciated as I can't afford a Ford garage diagnosis, nor repair :( Cheers all! Thoric
  14. Bizarre idling problem

    Hi stef123, thanks for the offer, I might just take you up on that cos I'm probably gonna need all the help I can get! Are you offering to scan the pages and email 'em to me? If so, please use rt18_uk@yahoo.co.uk. Thanks! I ain't got a Haynes myself, but I did once buy the Ford TIS on CD from Ebay. I've never yet had any real reason to use it. Maybe it'll turn out to be useful now :P
  15. Bizarre idling problem

    Thanks for the advise SierraYankee, I'll have to take a look at it. Hopefully a bit of a clean-up will be enough - otherwise a replacement part I guess...