RB2004

Budding Enthusiast
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About RB2004

  • Rank
    Settling In Well

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  • First Name
    Ronald J

Profile Information

  • Gender*
    Male
  • Ford Model
    Ford Focus 2008 Titanium with Sport Pack
  • Ford Year
    2008
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Essex
  • Annual Mileage
    5001 to 10,000

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  1. Just want to update on this. I did a timing belt yesterday on one of these engines and I carefully tested this theory. I found that the crankshaft pulley gets stuck on the crankshaft and requires a puller to remove. To use a puller you have to lower the engine down. When the engine is lowered down, by the time the top of the pulley is level with the bottom of the chassis leg the hose is at full tension. Any further and the hose would become damaged internally under the weight of the engine (I carefully lowered it down on a jack to point I felt the hose was safe as a test... if it breaks I will be accepting responsibility. After that I disconnected the hose. But full engine weight on the hose and the mechanic pulling engine downwards using a puller on it.. that would definitely damage the hose internally and I feel I have proven it after yesterday's experiment. So if the hose becomes damaged after a timing belt replacement, there you go that's why, engine lowered down and suspended by hose to get crankshaft pulley off. Doesn't need lowering down to do anything else at all: that's only thing. Seeming how low mileage this car was, I was changing belt based on years but it's only done 42k miles in 8 years. I'm assuming stuck pulleys are common. And require use of a puller. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Garages are doing things like this all the time and very rarely accept responsibility. First time it happened to me, customer heard the bang, and I couldn't argue it was already like it because it wasn't, that's why I ended up forking out for a new pipe out my own pocket and fitting it for free. Sad thing also about it is I lost work potentially over it. Because they was given my number by a friend of theirs who's car I had recharged previously and they had a business and promised to give out my details to their employees... but after this happened to their friends car that was last I heard from any of them as it probably fed back to him I broke the air con. But focus isn't the only car they do it to. MK4 mondeo is also a sufferer, the high pressure filling pipe goes through a hole between radiator and headlamp; you need an extension adaptor to connect to it. So what people who don't have the adaptor do instead is bend the pipe out to the side of the headlamp. I see this all the time and consider it criminal damage deliberately damaging an expensive aircon pipe just because they don't have the proper tool adaptor and tell people that if their car comes back like that to demand a replacement pipe. Because it can lead to failure of the pipe they fracture where the pipe is soldered into the aluminium block that bolts to condenser. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. I recommend disconnecting the hose at compressor end before lowering engine. If you look down from above at hose you can see that there is enough slack for engine movement but lowering engine more than a few inches will begin to stretch it. I've heard of similar damage on the mercedes A class compressor hoses, not actually come across it yet myself but you have to lower back of engine down to do some repair procedures like alternators and starter motors. The hose gets stretched in a similar way and fails. But I haven't seen one on an a class myself yet only heard about it happening. 1.6 focus mk2 though I've seen it time and time again. To put into perspective how common these are to fail, trust first Parts who are owned by ford and use their massive warehouses to supply local dealers rather than dealers getting direct from ford distribution centre. Last year I asked how many they had in stock of this pipe and it was over 100. They can't all be failing due to wear and tear, there's a cause, and timing belts are needed on every vehicle at some point or another making it a frequent part to fail. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. Yep I always tell people now to tell garage to degas the aircon, undo the hose then recharge aircon after when having timing belt done now because I'm reasonably sure it's the cause, if you take a look at the design of the hose when it's fitted to the car you can see there's a bit of slack to allow for engine movement, but there's not really sufficient slack to lower an engine down a few inches without stretching the hose. These hoses as you saw are reinforced. Before they can blow out the reinforcing has to fail, and the inner part of the hose tear slightly allowing gas to get in between the rubber layers. Then once that happens the outer part will swell up then burst and split open. But considering this problem only effects the 1.6 petrol engines it is likely to do with a repair procedure like timing belt as all vehicles have hoses from compressor to condenser in same way just slightly different shapes Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. I came to that conclusion because the way the hose comes out the compressor is not uncommon, it's actually pretty common even if the pipe is a different shape. But it always goes at the bottom just above where the crimped section joins the hose, and it is only 1.6 petrol mk2 focus which have the issue. First time it happened to me, I remembered that there was a sticker saying timing belt had been changed with an Ina kit. I gassed it, and bang it went.. customer asked what it was and needless to say as it wasn't split before I started then I had to accept liability as it blew while I was working on the car. It cost me a pipe and free fitting. Then I started warning customers in advance of gassing these engines up and I came across 1 more which blew when I gassed it but customer had been warned in advance, another one where customer had it gassed elsewhere and it blew them they tried to say it was his compressor, another one which was already split before I started, a second one which split when somebody else gassed it up, and only thing all of those vehicles had in common was either timing belt or water pump replacements and when you look at the hose you can see that if you try to lower the engine down, say to help undo crankshaft pulley, it doesn't take much before the hose starts stretching. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. I'm a mobile air conditioning person. This effects 1.6l mk2 focus petrols. Cause I've narrowed down to timing belt and water pump replacements. Pipe is not disconnected prior to starting job. Engine is lowered down which stretches the hose weakening it internally or more specifically breaking the string reinforcement. Then when gassed up refrigerant gets between the 2 layers of hose and ruptures the outer layer, it always fails near to the crimp because that's the it which gets stretched. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. First try disconnecting car battery and re-connecting it. if it still wont upload, then remove the ECU from the vehicle... its found in the passenger side wheelarch behind the plastic liner. need to cut slots in the heads of the bolts then you can undo with a screwdriver. next, need to physically open the ECU, then bench flash directly back onto the chip so you will need to find somebody who can give you an ECU dump. if you don't have the facility to do this a new PCM will be required and programming by ford as at the moment its essentially in a "Bricked" state.
  8. Stilsons will do it Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  9. TSB 95/2009 Should a customer express concern about exhaust gas smell inside of passenger cabin when the engine is running in idle and the vehicle is in stationary position, the probable cause is a misalignment of the catalytic converter to the turbocharger. Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  10. Can't remember but on Mondeo which s max is based on, on 1 engine there was a tsb about exhaust fumes. Apparently a bracket on exhaust where it joints turbo needed modifying and adjusting Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  11. No problem :) Lots of people think it's an engine mount, even on car parts websites it's listed under engine mount... But it's not an engine mount and does nothing to mount the engine. So like you have found you will have more luck searching for a engine roll restrictor. Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  12. It's not an engine mount. It's a torque / roll restrictor does nothing to mount engine, just stops it rolling backwards under acceleration. That's why you are Having problems probably because you are searching for engine mount. Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  13. Best to always use genuine plugs. On the fords genuine or ngk works but on the PSA cars ngk is bad for the engine and it's usually bosch or genuine that are recommended lol but bosch don't work so well on the Zetec engines. So genuine is only safe bet. Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  14. Just reload using AsBuilt data to reset everything. Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC
  15. Garage can use their smoke testing machine to fill car with smoke and see where it's leaking. Any decent garage now has a smoke machine for smoke testing inlet manifolds etc. Smoke is best way to test door seals Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC