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MrAntD

Budding Enthusiast
  • Content count

    4
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About MrAntD

  • Rank
    Newbie

Profile Information

  • Ford Model
    Mondeo MK4 TDCI Estate
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Lancashire
  1. My 2008 Mondeo is ready to have the worn trailing arm bushes replacein g. As many of yojumay know, Ford wiill only replace the whole unit at a cost of £320 per side - £640 is a lot of money! I've done my research and can get quality bushes, but don't have the tools to do the job properly. First Line have developed a tool especially to tremove the bushes in -situe taking less than an hour for both sides. I'm looking for a garage that can do this in the Liverpool of Merseyside area. Would any of the forum members know of any specialist of mechanic that has the tool yet or that I could call? As it costs less than £400 to buy, it would be a big sell for any garage top bring in Mondeo owners! For those who are as curious as me, here's the link to youtube re the First Line tool: Cheers
  2. Well, funny you should say that - I have got photos of the job, so I'd love to make it into a guide - can you let me know what I need to do and where to place it? A
  3. I recently changed both rear wheel bearings/hubs and hope this post helps others, as it was quite hard to get tips apart from using my Haynes.... Apart from the usual spanners and sockets, I used: T55 1/2" socket (used a 1/4" and it snapped) the extra force allowed is helpful! a ratchet extender - I used a steel pipe - this allowed me more control in a tight space. Axle stand (so your jack can be used on the suspension if needed). A bit of string - useful for tying the calliper in various places out of the way. 2x4 bit of wood a bit over 1 foot long Brakes - there are plenty of blogs on brakes - check them! I removed the road wheel, loosened the disc securing screw with a T50, removed the calliper, pads and then the calliper holder - this was done without removing the handbrake cable or brake fluid hose. I removed the pads so I could easily remove the calliper past the lip worn in the disc. I tied the calliper out of the way with the string. I then removed the disc securing screw and removed the disc. this was stuck on so I gave it a whack with a wooden mallet and off it came. Hub bearing - I needed to get better access as I was working from the side of the car, so I released the upper control arm from the hub carrier. This can be identified bolt going through a bush ion the hub carrier, control arm and holding bracket for the brake hose and cables. I used a trolley jack to hold the suspension in place and left it there throughout the hub removal and fitting process. Next I undid the top bolt on the anti-roll bar and let the suspension down using the jack. Removing the star bolts was hard as they are hidden away, and I sheared the lesser 1/4" T55 socket - but with a new 1/2" T55, a short wrench extension and the steel tube on the handle, they eventually loosened .... relief....: a torch is handy to get a look at the bolts. Refitting was a reverse of removal, but aligning the control arm with the hub carrier was hard - the jack came in handy, a spare pair of hands and a 2X4 bit of wood knocked in between the ground and the new hub to raise it. I'm sure there are better ways of doing this.... The job took about 3 hours for both sides and saved £100s. lf you know of better ways of doing this than me please add to this post. Cheers
  4. Hi Hope you don't mind my tagging this on to your question - when I was changing my rear hub it was always the 1st that came up on google. I have written an account of changing the rear hub on my Mondeo Mk4 TDCI Estate and it may help others: Apart from the usual spanners and sockets, I used: T55 1/2" socket (used a 1/4" and it snapped) the extra force allowed is helpful! a ratchet extender - I used a steel pipe - this allowed me more control in a tight space. Axle stand (so your jack can be used on the suspension if needed). A bit of string - useful for tying the calliper in various places out of the way. 2x4 bit of wood a bit over 1 foot long Brakes - there are plenty of blogs on brakes - check them! I removed the road wheel, loosened the disc securing screw with a T50, removed the calliper, pads and then the calliper holder - this was done without removing the handbrake cable or brake fluid hose. I removed the pads so I could easily remove the calliper past the lip worn in the disc. I tied the calliper out of the way with the string. I then removed the disc securing screw and removed the disc. this was stuck on so I gave it a whack with a wooden mallet and off it came. Hub bearing - I needed to get better access as I was working from the side of the car, so I released the upper control arm from the hub carrier. This can be identified bolt going through a bush ion the hub carrier, control arm and holding bracket for the brake hose and cables. I used a trolley jack to hold the suspension in place and left it there throughout the hub removal and fitting process. Next I undid the top bolt on the anti-roll bar and let the suspension down using the jack. Removing the star bolts was hard as they are hidden away, and I sheared the lesser 1/4" T55 socket - but with a new 1/2" T55, a short wrench extension and the steel tube on the handle, they eventually loosened .... relief....: a torch is handy to get a look at the bolts. Refitting was a reverse of removal, but aligning the control arm with the hub carrier was hard - the jack came in handy, a spare pair of hands and a 2X4 bit of wood knocked in between the ground and the new hub to raise it. I'm sure there are better ways of doing this.... The job took about 3 hours for both sides and saved £100s.
  5. Welcome to the Ford forums MrAntD :)