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ScaniaPBman

Budding Enthusiast
  • Content count

    77
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About ScaniaPBman

  • Rank
    Settling In Well

Contact Methods

  • First Name
    Mike

Profile Information

  • Gender*
    Male
  • Ford Model
    Focus MK2.5 Auto
  • Ford Year
    2010
  • UK/Ireland Location
    West Midlands
  • Annual Mileage
    10,001 to 15,000

Recent Profile Visitors

1,124 profile views
  1. The correct answer is your best tyres should be on the REAR axle. THe reasoning behind this is fairly straight forward. In extreme driving conditions such as snow,ice or just standing water on the road surface where grip is limited or hydroplaning occurs, it is much safer and easier to control the car when the grip is lost on the front axle rather than the rear. There are several youtube videos attesting to this. Here's a sample... ScaniaPBman.
  2. Yup, I have had this ball joint off several times without any taper breaker tool. Once you have the technique it just falls off. First loosen the ball joint nut a few turns, then put a sturdy lever through the lower arm so that you can put a seperating force on the offending taper. A force equivalent to Mrs ScaniaPBman's weight on the end of the lever does the job nicely. Wallop the collar that the ball joint taper is held in, and bingo it releases. ScaniaPBman.
  3. Same for me. Three years ago I bought a MK2 Titanium 1.6 petrol with 80,000 miles on the clock. 2 weeks later the right front coil spring went bang. I replaced only that one spring. The car has gone now to 120,000 miles with no more spring problems. Only do the one is my advice. ScaniaPBman.
  4. Well it beats me. I read frequently that an owner takes his car to a garage saying 'fix this problem'. The garage does something and does NOT fix the problem. The owner then has to pay up for the privilege. Something is wrong somewhere, surely. ScaniaPBman.
  5. If I have a flashing P in the future on my Focus I will remember this advice. Thanks, ScaniaPBman.
  6. As others have done, lets consider that there are two seperate problems. Considering the on/off brakelight I had exactly the same problem.The cause was a faulty contact inside the bulb holder, difficult to track down if you are not familiar with that type of failure. I was round all relevant earth points, fuses and belling the wires before I found the cause. This was reported in this topic And here is the relevant advice I had similar troubles to you with the rear side/brake light bulb. Sometimes only the side light would work, then both or neither. The power was there on both wires when it should be. The problem was the little earth tag inside the bulb holder. It's supposed to press on the side of the bulb metal base to complete the electrical circuit to earth. On mine the tag had broken off and was making intermittent contact. The fix was easy, I removed a bit of copper from a cable and rammed it placed it carefully in the gap as I inserted the bulb. That was 3 months ago and it's still lighting up well. ScaniaPBman. PS I seem to have screwed up the quote formatting above, but the info is there!
  7. I had exactly the same problem. my key stopped working. I self-diagnosed that the little microswitches under the buttons had failed. I sent it off to this man who advertises his services on ebay. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/REPAIR-SERVICE-for-Ford-Focus-Mondeo-Fiesta-Puma-Ka-3-button-remote-key-fob-FIX-/371093480558?hash=item5666e5246e:g:ZmwAAOxy3zNSh6IX It came back promptly, but could I get it to re-register with the car, no matter how I tried the ignition on/off procedure it would not work. In desperation I visited my friendly local lock man. He tested the key with some sort of a signal receiver and declared that the key was functioning correctly. He walked out to the car, did the on/off shuffle and the key started the car straight away. I felt a right fool. I watched him do it exactly as I had done it. There is clearly a knack to this method, and I have not got it. ScaniaPBman.
  8. That bolt looks as if it's tight. Soak it before hand with WD40 or equivalent and only use a 6 point socket with a breaker bar. See here for why a six point socket is better. A 12-point socket is fine for most lightweight repairs, but heavy wrenching calls for a six-point socket. A six-point socket is much less likely to slip off a stubborn fastener or round over the corners. Here's why: (1) Six-point sockets have thicker walls, so they're less likely to flex. (2) A six-point socket is designed to contact the head of a fastener well away from the corners so contact is made on the thickest part of the socket and the flattest part of the fastener. This dramatically reduces the likelihood of slippage and rounding over the corners. And (3), the edges of a socket are angled back a few degrees to allow the socket to slide easily over a fastener. The angle is less on a six-point socket than on its 12-point counterpart, again providing more contact area inside the socket.
  9. I have had leaks from the low pressure rubber pipe that runs from the fluid bottle to the pump. It had me foxed for a while since it appeared to come from the pump its self. So my advice is clean everything thoroughly and remember about that rubber pipe (£25 if I remember correctly) before you condemn anything else. ScaniaPBman.
  10. I have just had the rear seats out of my MK2.5 Focus. I guess your MK1.5 is much the same. You don't say which bolts are actually causing a problem. Some have the end of the threaded part exposed under the car and I recon it is one of those that is stuck. What I would do is to be radical. Just drill the offending bolt right out, You can estimate the drill size from one of the other bolts. Then replace this with a bolt and nut. Forget about trying to put a thread back into the body hole. Job done. ScaniaPBman.
  11. As I understand it, the PowerShift dual clutch auto box is specified on Focus models in USA. There is a good general Focus web site based there with lots of info on transmissions problems. That's a bad sign, people only post when they have a problem. This is the site http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/general-technical-chat/ You have to be a member to carry out a search but you can bypass this requirement with this trick. In Google construct a search in this format powershift site:http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/general-technical-chat/ It will only search the nominated site and give you results containing the selected word. Replace the word powershift with any other you think would home in on your problem better and search again. I personally don't use Google because of their policy on data storage and tracking. This search trick will work equally well on https://duckduckgo.com/ They don't track you and do just as good a search. Good luck, ScaniaPBman
  12. You are correct, the fuel economy isn't the best however I am prepared to accept this in return for much better reliability and the convenience of driving an auto through traffic every day to and from work. I have no complaint about the refinement, the newer boxes are indeed an improvement. At work I frequently drive a Mercedes Sprinter diesel with a dual clutch auto and find it really smooth. It's good that the boss has to worry about any potential reliability problems and not me, though I must say that this Sprinter seems OK and I haven't heard the boss complain yet. For impressive auto box performance try a coach or truck with a Volvo iShift. ScaniaPBman
  13. I too prefer auto transmission cars. I have run 3 MK2s 1.6 petrols with the 4 speed torque converter auto with no problems at all. 2 of them reached 130,000 miles and the one I sold at this mileage was still going strong. I currently run the other two, one for me and the other for Mrs ScaniaPBman. I had considered a 2 L petrol auto but it has a Ford PowerShift six-speed dual clutch semi automatic gearbox which comes with a bad reputation for reliability so I would not recommend this to you. See the Wikipedia comment here further down under the heading of Controversy and copied here. Ford has faced class action lawsuits in the United States,[7] Australia[8] and Canada[9] over the PowerShift gearbox as being defective and potentially dangerous in the Ford Focus, Ford Fiesta and Ford EcoSport. The lawsuits allege that the PowerShift gearbox "continue to experience the transmission defect, including, but not limited to, bucking, kicking, jerking, harsh engagement, and delayed acceleration and lurching." Best of luck, ScaniaPBman.
  14. The paint sprayers these days seem to do better colour matching than previously. I have had 2 paint jobs done on my car and I cannot see the 'join' in the paint on the panel. I suspect if I looked hard enough in the correct light conditions I might detect something but I am not that fussy really. It all looks fine to me. ScaniaPBman
  15. Mrs ScaniaPBman managed to do worse than that to the front bumper corner. No plastic was cracked but there were deepish scratches about 10cm long. I went to my friendly back street paint sprayer/body man who quoted £70. He did a good job respraying most of the front bumper. This should give you a guide to the cost for your job. ScaniaPBman.