barrymx5

Budding Enthusiast
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    21
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About barrymx5

  • Rank
    Member

Profile Information

  • Gender*
    Male
  • Ford Year
    2014
  • Annual Mileage
    0 to 5000
  1. Waiting for delivery of my new Bosch Glow Plugs from micksgarage.com for the best price of £7.61 each. There's even a £5 discount if you sign up for the news letter. They should arrive today, so I'll keep you informed. My experience seems to be similar to that of yours, in that the car has been both starting and idling ok. There is a discrepancy between the plugs when I do the ohms meter test, though I'm not certain I've done that correctly. I do know they're not all the same reading, in which case I'm changing them all.
  2. Should have mentioned, I'm in Formby, NR Southport and Liverpool.
  3. Thx for the info. I'll investigate my glow plugs, which have covered 83k. I suppose I discounted the glow plugs initially cos I've had no problems with starting or idle, unlike how faulty spark plugs might have reacted. I'll investigate how best to remove them with minimum risk of damage. Once I see the effect of changing them, I'll consider the EGR blank. Thanks again.
  4. Ok. To blank or not to blank, that is the question! I might just try a blast down the bypass and try to warm/free things up, though I'm a little concerned that I might damage the engine. Apparently, if I have good oil compression there shouldn't be a problem. If this fails, it only leaves the dreaded garage diagnostic check, for whatever price they want to rip me off with. Such is life!. Cheers to all those who commented.
  5. The alternator has been renewed recently and the battery is sound. I've done a voltage check to the battery using a multimeter, and it functions as it should. I've been chasing any information that might give a clue to the cause, and a few things may have some relevance such as, the glow plugs might need replacing, the CAT might need a clean, the EGR might need stripping and cleaning and there might be a dirty or dodgy connection on the instrument cluster. I'm not sure about the idea of blanking the EGR off, as it must be there for good reason. I'm determined to get to the bottom of this, like a dog with a bone! I was amazed to view a YouTube footage of a guy with the exact same problem with regards to the code reader check. He even had the same basic meter, which indicated 'no codes' and yet the engine light kept coming back on only seconds after cancelling. He also had the A103 and 9318 codes on the cars own check system. Unfortunately, the guy doesn't actually resolve anything, but at least I know others are having a similar experience. I'd love to hear from those of you who have also had similar experience, and what you did to resolve it.
  6. Come on guys, there must be someone out there with constructive comment. I tried out a cheap ebay code reader, but no codes show up. The cars on board system check was a bit more helpful, giving two codes 9318 (low voltage) and A103 (Antenna not connected, defective transceiver) A battery check rules out the low voltage, and I'm not sure how to check the other. Any suggestions?
  7. Thanks for the prompt replies. The fuel and air filters are brand new and the 1.8 Focus Mk2 turbo diesel has a CAT. Do you know where I can I get a code reader for £15.00, and will it do the job?
  8. My 55 Focus Mk2 Diesel engine light is on, and the acceleration/power is reduced. The light sometimes goes off and full power is restored, when I get to a higher speed. As soon as I drop back to street speeds, the light comes back on and the power/acceleration reduces. My car has covered 80k, much of which has been only local driving during recent years. I've tried using the Wynns diesel EGR 3 air intake cleaner to clean the EGR valve and Mass airflow sensor. I've also changed the air and fuel filters, which weren't that dirty and have been changed regularly. I get the feeling the fault might be close to resolving itself seeing as it clears at higher speeds, and I'm wondering if I just need a good long run in order to heat and clear the system. I've been slightly reluctant to go to the expense of a code reading, but I appreciate that this could be the only solution in order to identify the problem. This is my next move, unless someone could suggest some DIY remedies. Any suggestions/experience would be greatly appreciated, including which budget OEBD scanner to buy.
  9. I'm left in little doubt that my mk2 1.8 55 plate Focus has a timing belt and a timing chain. Ford recommend them both being changed at 125k or 10yr intervals. Having researched all the various forums, I feel confident that it is best to change the belt between 60 to 80k to be on the safe side. With regards to the chain, there would seem to be little or no evidence of any failures during the life of the engine. The sceptic might believe that the chain is included in the maintenance schedule as a money making ruse. I guess that it's up to the individual to take their chances, and if in doubt, have it changed. Personally, I'm leaving well alone. I found an interesting dialogue on the talkford.com Forum that might be of interest:- 'misterlogic', on 18 Apr 2012 - 3:08 PM, said: Hi Fraser The "100% conclusive" answer can be found by registering on the Ford ETIS web site: www.etis.ford.com and then entering your vehicle registration. This provides the exact vehicle specification and recommended maintenance operations. In the case of your car, the following are listed: • Camshaft drive belt - Every 125 000 miles/10 years - Renew (LTS 21 304 9) • Fuel pump drive chain/belt - Every 125 000 miles/10 years - Renew (LTS 21 304 9 / 21 314 7) • Auxiliary drive belts - Every 125 000 miles/10 years - Renew (LTS 21 567 5) This indicates that, regardless of whether the fuel pump is driven by a chain or a belt, it should be replaced at 125000 miles. I hope that helps. Thanks that is very helpful, however : I've taken the car to two Ford specialists, who confirm that whilst ford say the chain needs doings at 125k, it is the exact same chain as on the previous 1.8 TDCI Lynxs variants including focus, transit and other models, there is no difference. I am informed that engine has evolved on the mk4 1.8 tdci mondeobut is mostly the same, albeit with an upgraded fuel system. They have confirmed that the chain setup is entirely the same as on older lynx engines and the chain has always been for the life of the car. Further to this, I was informed that its a very short chain that is strong and not prone to breaking, it has a proven track record as long as the cars oil is changed regularly. Both specialists were able to say, that having serviced many lynxs engines over the years and they have never seen this specific chain snap and as such recommend that only the belt needs doing. They were of course happy to replace the chain if I was insistent but obviously there would be extra for the parts and labour involved. Conclusion - The servicing of the chain at 125k may possibly be a technical blunder by Ford, who have simply put a token service interval on it, due to the belt / belt in oil setup needing both doing at 125k, therefore in fact to labelling both setups together for simplicity when in fact they are two completely different scenarios, i.e. Belt / Belt need both replacing at 125k and Belt / Chain only needs belt at 125k. Its either that or its about making £££ as the belt and chain together are much more to replace.
  10. Hi Ian, I've bought the cam belt kit from carparts4less. You give your car reg and they supply the correct product for your car, which is only one belt and an idler. I've had the cover off the timing belt, so I can say with some certainty that my 1.8 durotorq diesel engine has the one belt. It may well have a chain elsewhere, but my understanding is that this seldom needs changing unless the car has a particularly high mileage. The 1.6 is a different beast altogether, and looking at the Haynes manual, it seems far more difficult to deal with.
  11. Looking at the 54 to 09 Haynes manual, the 1.6 and 1.8 are quite different. It actually looks a lot easier to change the belt on the 1.8 as you don't need to remove the auxiliary belt and other bits to get at the timing belt. I guess it's all about working to the book and using lots of common sense. Do you have any tips on attaching an image to a post?
  12. Hi Ian, it's a 1.8 diesel. If it helps I'll attach some recent images of my inspection. I just need to find out how to.
  13. Wow! I can't believe the prompt replies to my post, I'm well chuffed. I only wish Sonic and myself were related and he could add my job to his list lol! I'll try to find out the specialist tools I'll need for the job, and learn a bit more about adjusting the timing. Meanwhile, I'll phone around for quotes lol!
  14. Thanks for the reply. Just to get the timing belt cover off, I've had to support the engine and remove the left engine support bracket. I've already changed the auxiliary belt without problem. I suppose I've watched too many YouTube demos, when they just use a 6mm drill to lock the timing, and mark the various positions with tippex. However, I respect what you're saying and unless I'm convinced to do otherwise, I'll leave well alone. I'm probably hoping for someone to say that they had done it and it was a piece of cake. Wishful thinking maybe!