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TurboZutek

Budding Enthusiast
  • Content count

    128
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About TurboZutek

  • Rank
    Feet Under The Table

Profile Information

  • Ford Model
    New Fiesta
  1. Yeah I did wonder about the EGR, it seemed about right symptoms wise. Wish I could disable the thing actually, it's just a stupid waste of time engine killer! I have to confess I've ran the car on some very cheap supermarket diesel more than a few times when I've been in a rush early in the morning (which I guess would be soon after delivery), the fuel filter possibility is worth looking into. I guess even though I've only done a few miles in the grand scheme of things, it'd only take one batch of crap diesel (which could happen at any time) to cause a blockage. As for the procedure on checking / changing the filter - do you really need to take most of the front end apart!? That's insane! Any details on this procedure online anywhere and I could have a shufty at it myself? Also, £60 for a piece of mesh and gauze is taking the p!ss bigtime! Ugh. Many thanks for the reply matey, that helps me out a lot! Chris...
  2. So, I've noticed something interesting (and irritating) about my MK7 Fiesta 1.4 TDCi, I wonder if anyone has the same; From 1.5 to 2 kRPM, there's a bit of a judder / wobble in the power output. It's like the car is overfueling / underfueling and the power output isn't nice and smooth. Seems to happen in all conditions. After 2.2kRPM the turbo gets on boost and the power output is fine all the way to the redline. Car has 17k miles on the clock and is totally unmodified, running BP Diesel. Checked the obvious tyre pressure and wheel balance, of course! Anyone else had this? Something to flag up at the next service maybe? Chris...
  3. Yeah I checked with my insurance company before I had the rubber swapped - as long as it's no more than two profiles up and I'm not changing the physical alloy wheel itself, they don't give a monkey's; which is handy as if it had changed my renewal any I might not have bothered. If you're concerned of course, I'd recommend you double check with your insurance provider before changing, each has their own set of rules. Chris...
  4. Aww, look at the cute wee brake disk in the middle, totally lost in the sea of alloy! :)
  5. The new ones are NANKANG XR611's (Online Review) which cost £180 for 4 wheels fully installed. As always, could have gone cheaper, could have gone dearer, but based on reviews these tyres hit a good value point for me. As you say, the factory tyres didn't impress me much and I was very close to needing to replace all four anyway, especially as the TDCi can have an appetite for front tyres when driven, eh, non-conservatively! The tyre fitter for a little extra could have also sorted me out with 195/50's, which would maybe be a good compromise between keeping the low profile look and adding a little extra comfort I guess. Chris...
  6. Not really, you'd need to see the roads we have around here to understand though (both the phrases above relate directly to the road quality, as mentioned in my first paragraph). My local council doesn't have £1 to put in the leccy meter, let alone the money required to make a decent job of the roads I'm afraid, especially as my town houses a trucking company and a ton of bus routes which make a right mess. :-( As a result the tyre fitter I use gets a lot of work repairing alloys. Also, to clarify I wouldn't say it was a 'soft ride' now either - it still feels very taught while being a little less dramatic on the rough stuff and a 1cm gain doesn't really put us in 'big tyres' territory. Not like this anyways: :D Chris...
  7. So one of the things that sorta annoyed me about my New Fiesta Titanium from day one was its crashing and overly harsh ride quality. It's not the cars fault really, more a poor match of tyres for Scotland's crumbling roads. The factory tyres I'm sure are wonderful on Germany's well maintained Autobahn, but rubbish on Scotland's M8 and A roads. Not only were my teeth starting to suffer after crashing down an uneven and badly maintained road full of potholes, but the rims can actually be damaged too, with one or two chips appearing on the leading edge. So what to do, given you can never avoid every bad road surface? Well, slightly taller tyres seemed like an idea! Before: Fiesta sitting on the factory 195/45 tyres. After: Fiesta sitting on new 195/55 tyres. I had a few reservations, which I'll attempt to address here: 1. Uh, isn't the speedometer out now that you've changed the wheels rolling radius? Yes, the speedometer always over-reported the speed by 5 MPH, so if I was doing 30 it would read 35. Now it reads 30, so that has actually improved! The speed was checked against my GPS and also on a calibrated kilometre at Kinning Park industrial estate, Glasgow. 2. Does it feel more sluggish now? Not that I can notice. This was my biggest concern, that I'd loose 'nippyness' for want of a better word, but it's just as quick with the slightly taller tyres. 3. How's the handling? More or less unchanged - there is the tiny perception of being slightly further off the ground, but really nothing's different. Still grips the road perfectly and doesn't mind being chucked around at all. On less than perfect surfaces the handling is improved, as the car gets knocked off course less. 4. Any unintended consequences? As the car now sits a little higher, you don't scrape the front airdam on steep inclines or have to slow down quite so much for speed-bumps. Also, these tyres are a lot quieter than the old ones so road noise is reduced a bit too, though that may have nothing to do with the size change. In addition, there is more rubber presented on the side wall of the tyre, hence kerbing is more likely to skiff the tyre than damage the alloy rim now, though I'm very careful to avoid kerbing the wheels anyway. 5. Any bottoming out or arch rubbing? None found. As a test I filled the car with people, put some weight in the boot and went for a drive - all was fine. 6. So did it actually work? I would say yes, it has had the intended effect. The ride is FAR more comfortable and hitting rough patches on the road is no longer a ball-breaking experience. The comfort factor is 100% improved. So yeah, if you find your Titanium is a bit uncomfortable on UK roads, you could do worse than give this a try. Chris...
  8. Mine is a Titanium, but also has the low-line (small display) audio system that the Style does. It's exactly the same for MP3 playback as yours: pants. Chris...
  9. YUCK! Also, how do you then configure the settings on the car or read any service messages?? Chris...
  10. Holy !Removed!!! Did they give you a new Ka!?
  11. YES. I've helped retrofit AC to a couple of Volvos and a Rover 214. It's actually very straightforward to do (easy, even) but it is a bit of work. Basically, you gotta get the whole AC system from a scrapper (new pipes are recommended, it's very hard to remove them undamaged!!) then you have to mount the compressor to the engine which is a doddle (except the tensioner was tricky on the Rover). The accumulator and radiator just bolt in under the bonnet, the mount holes are already there in most cases. Next up you have to remove 90% of the dash on the car and mount the AC airbox; after which you sort out the plumbing. Get the system refilled by a professional and check for leaks (I had one on the first Volvo I did, but the installer used flourescent dye which shows up very clearly... One new 'o' ring later and it's sorted). AND THEN... You have to check the wiring is in place to raise the idle speed when the AC is switched on. For the first Volvo this needed a solenoid installed on the Carb, but the other two (fuel injected) already had the wire on the loom to raise the speed, so they were pretty much plug and play. Last I heard the Rover is still working perfectly (three years on) and the second Volvo needed a re-charge after a year but is still going strong. So yeah, it's a lot of somewhat fiddly work, but nothing about it is rocket science. Here's some links (none of which pertain directly to the Fiesta, but should give you an idea): http://homepage.ntlworld.com/simon.stirley/fitac.html http://forums.mg-rover.org/showthread.php?t=24983 http://forums.mg-rover.org/showthread.php?t=325021 And there's also some intelligent discussion (unlike the thread on the subject here) on MPG affects of Air-Con: http://forums.mg-rover.org/showthread.php?t=322578 Have a read and figure out if it's best to retro-fit or maybe sell up and buy one with it fitted from the factory. Best of luck matey! Chris...
  12. Wow, the gains to be had on the 1.4 are pretty miserable. Not worth £341 odd quid, in my opinion. Wonder when the BlueFin for the MK7 will be out? Chris...
  13. All that filter's gonna do on a Diesel is introduce heat-soak to the incoming air. That's not good! Freeflowing air filters certianly do have their place in tuning diesels, but they are not the first place to start. Normally re-mapping, boost tweaking, cams, pump up-lobing and a few other tricks are employed either seperatly or in combination with the filter to get extra power. This filter on its own will probably degrade performance and might reduce torque due to the air induction path modification. If you want a filter for a Diesel, I'd recommend trying a panel filter in the standard air box first. Chris...
  14. While that's true, it's worth keeping in mind that a car without power brakes has a different design of brake cylinder - a car with power brakes which looses vaccum will not respond nearly as well under braking as a car designed to run normally without it (Same goes for power steering). I'd be suprised if the more delicatly framed people among us could stop a Fiesta which has lost power assistance to the brakes very quickly... Especially the 1.6 which is one of the heavier petrols. All this to say, if this recall affects you - get it checked yesterday! Chris...
  15. Save some time and hassle - dump them straight into the bin. They will work just as well there as they will clamped to your car. Chris...