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flying clutchman

Budding Enthusiast
  • Content count

    182
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About flying clutchman

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    Feet Under The Table

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  • Ford Model
    transit2.5D
  1. CORRECTION: GEARLINK!!
  2. I've found myself in need of a tiny plastic/nylon bush that fits on the external gear selector. As this gearbox is peculiar to the st170 it's no longer made by ford. I now seem to have 2 options : measure the space (about 8-10mm) and make one myself, or buy a 2nd hand box for about £150 to get one silly bush. Anyone have any other suggestions
  3. Gearchange cable. There are two. How about reverse? does that select ok?
  4. How on earth is the average motorist supposed to top up fluid on a c-max. I have a foot long flexible tube which does the job but then I have a van full of specialist tools which most people don't have. How hard would it have been to put a filler extension on the resevoir (like they do on the oil filler). Poor design!
  5. The stationary in-gear test is not a 100% guide and needs a bit of expertise to do properly. It can also completely kill an ailing clutch! I often struuggle to make customers cars slip but when I take the gearbox out find the clutch lining to be worn well past the limit. The test was originally applied to asbestos clutches which could be stressed much more and would resume their operation once cooled down. Fortunately for our lungs asbestos has been banned in the EU since the 1980s .
  6. I would have expected the clutch to have been changed before 150k miles, but it's still possibly the original. The big difference between the petrol and diesel models is that the diesel versions wear out the dmf often before the clutch. On the petrol versions the dmf normaslly lasts the lifetime of the car. That's not 100% guaranteed of course but it's rare to need a dmf in a petrol. I've never changed one but have done scores of diesel dmfs.
  7. It's your gearchange cable. The gear lever has two cables which run from it to the gearbox. One does backwards and forwards movement, the other side to side. It's the side to side one which is giving the problem. It has either snapped, or has popped off the slector on the gearbox. If it's snapped then the cables (they come as a pair) need to be changed. If it's popped off the end of the selector, then you may be able to pop it back on and find a way with a cable tie or something similar to stop it coming off again. The cables are a main dealer item (don't be tempted by cheap imaitations on ebay, they're rubbish) and are eye wateringly expensive at close on £200 a pair. It's also a horrible fiddly job to do I think the 2.0l model has got the mondeo box in it which has the selector mechanism at the back, but I may be wrong in which case it's at the front of the box encased in a plastic cover.
  8. Symptoms for dmf failure vary wildly. Your description however sounds pretty typical. The way in which they fail varies as well. Sometimes they seize up completely, which cosidering the clutch plate has no torsion springs transmits all the engine vibration directly though the gearbox. Age and mileage are pretty typical for dmf going as well
  9. You're not seeing the bit of the flywheel that causes the problem. The filings come from the heads of rivets being worn away on the back of the flywheel. There's no way you can get a look at this without taking the flywheel off.
  10. If the car is having difficulty selecting gears while stationary then it's likely to bhe clutch related. The reason is this: provided the car is completely stationary when you push the clutch down, every thing in the gearbox should stop moving. Try selecting first or reverse before you switch on. If it selects easily, but won't when you start the engine, it suggests the clutch is not quite disengaging 100% One thing you can try which might help is to press the clutch in and hold for 2 or 3 seconds before you try to select the offending gear. This gives the clutch disc time to stop spinning, it helps sometimes.
  11. Fitting a smf is not an upgrade, it's just an alternative. It's almost standard practice on transits, but I don't really see an advantage on most cars. Presumably you don't drive 40k miles a year (unless you are a taxi driver), so a new dmf should last a few years. A smf often results in a less smooth drive in terms of vibration etc. (not always though). The main advantage of an smf is that you never need to change it again. Basically that means for the average person you can save £300 once every four years. Will you even still have the car then? There are lots of horror stories doing the rounds about damage done by smfs, personally I think they're nonsense. Dmfs are fitted to smooth out the harshness of diesel engines that's all. You pays your money and you takes your choice.
  12. Can't really make out much on the video, but from your description I'd say it's pretty much definitely the gearbox. Other than checking tou've got oil in it, there's not much you can do other than start saving for a new box!
  13. you've probably got a fault with the clutch that it's stuck in the released position. Pumping the pedal has persuaded it to spring back again.You will almost certainly need to change dmf as well as the clutch
  14. Can't say I'm a fan of QH clutch kits, ideally you want LUK ot Sachs. If you fit the centre plate back to front it won't affect the fitting at all. It just affects the operation of the clutch. On some cars it will even work when it's the wrong way round. Pressure bleeding of concentrics is specifically mentioned in the instructions as something to avoid as it can blow the seals (not quite sure how but I have seen it done). It can't be very often that the pressure gained can be greater than normal clutch pedal pressure, but I didn't write the instructions! If you've got pressure on the pedal then something's wrong with the clutch.
  15. The earlier focus should bleed very easily. This is because the cylinder (aluminium not plastic) has a floating ball valve in it, so as long as you get most of the air out it bleeds itself. The way to bleed the csc properly is as follows. Make sure the reservoir is topped up to the brim. Disconnect the pipe from the slave and allow fluid to dribble out for about 5 seconds. Reconnect pipe, place one-way bleed tube on nipple and open bleed nipple. Pump pedal up and down about 4 or 5 times. Close bleed nipple, pump pedal. Pressure should be up now. repeat bleeding if neccessary. If you have good pressure but the clutch still doesn't work the fault is in the clutch unit. Either the clutch is faulty or you have fitted the centre disc the wrong way round. If pressure is still not right (it will feel lighter than before clutch change) then maybe the master cylinder is faulty. The brakes have nothing to do with the clutch operation. If you examine the reservoir you will see there are two seperate chambers in it. It is in effect two reservoirs with one filler opening. The metal cylinder with metal pipework doesn't have the little o-ring on the end (although it's something to watch out for at the m/c end!) so it's not that. What make of parts have you used?