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#1 sid777

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:35 AM

hi everyone please help, im new to this site so be tender, i have bought a 55reg focus 1.6tdci, i was driving when suddenly a "red warning light" came on dash its a "ring type with a exclamation mark in it" i lost power immediately the more you put your foot down the slower it gets it seems the turbo does not kick in, checked manual it doesnt help at all, has any one come across this problem?

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#2 catch

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 12:38 PM

hi everyone please help, im new to this site so be tender, i have bought a 55reg focus 1.6tdci, i was driving when suddenly a "red warning light" came on dash its a "ring type with a exclamation mark in it" i lost power immediately the more you put your foot down the slower it gets it seems the turbo does not kick in, checked manual it doesnt help at all, has any one come across this problem?



Hi there and welcome,

well seeing as you have just bought the car and you have got this warning message with a loss of power. It sounds to me that the car went into "limp home mode" it does this because the engine management system sees an issue that left un resolve could damage your engine, or threaten your safety. As the car is an unknown entity to you, it's best that you have it connected to a diagnostics program by a Ford garage. Lest way then you will know what the problems are. It could be all sorts, it could be a blocked "diesel particulate filter" maybe the elyos oil needs replenishing given the age of the car, like I say who knows hence the diagnostics check.

How many miles has it covered, has it had a Ford 36K service done? Did you buy it from a dealer/trader recently? Maybe it was sold on because the previous owner knew what the fault was and wanted shut of it. If it was a private sale you have no comeback.

#3 artscot79

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:08 PM

Hi there and welcome,

well seeing as you have just bought the car and you have got this warning message with a loss of power. It sounds to me that the car went into "limp home mode" it does this because the engine management system sees an issue that left un resolve could damage your engine, or threaten your safety. As the car is an unknown entity to you, it's best that you have it connected to a diagnostics program by a Ford garage. Lest way then you will know what the problems are. It could be all sorts, it could be a blocked "diesel particulate filter" maybe the elyos oil needs replenishing given the age of the car, like I say who knows hence the diagnostics check.

How many miles has it covered, has it had a Ford 36K service done? Did you buy it from a dealer/trader recently? Maybe it was sold on because the previous owner knew what the fault was and wanted shut of it. If it was a private sale you have no comeback.



if it was bought private you do have comeback now at least in scotland if a person has sold the vehicle from there home address and a fault is immediately present that wasnt there when you test drove the car then you can get the previous owner to pay for diagnostics if they do that is otherwise its a trading standards and a court job if its a garage take it straight back dont let them clear the code and send you on youre way it will only reappear insist on a adiagnostics and insist on it being repaired

#4 catch

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 02:59 PM

if it was bought private you do have comeback now at least in scotland if a person has sold the vehicle from there home address and a fault is immediately present that wasnt there when you test drove the car then you can get the previous owner to pay for diagnostics if they do that is otherwise its a trading standards and a court job if its a garage take it straight back dont let them clear the code and send you on youre way it will only reappear insist on a adiagnostics and insist on it being repaired


Not arguing about how it works in Bonny Scotland as I'm ignorant of the facts.
That said, the Scots have always been far more advanced than those warmongering Sassenachs.

But the other 65 million peeps in the UK are most likely not legally covered in the same way See Here

And to quote the above site....I bought it from a bloke down the pub

the statutory term of satisfactory quality only applies if you have bought something from a commercial entity – a supplier or retailer who is acting ‘in the course of a business’. In this respect, your rights under Sale of Goods apply even if the item you have bought is second-hand, as long as you buy it from a registered trader or retailer. If you buy something from a private seller, you don’t have the benefit of this protection and must employ ‘buyer beware’. For this reason, take good care when buying a second hand car from a private seller.


I agree, whether or not a warranty was given by a trader or dealer, a buyer is still covered by "Your statutory rights" as explained in the supplied links. So if it was indeed bought from a dealer/trader take it back to them and insist they sort it out...or else

#5 sid777

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 07:54 PM

hi there, this car (ford focus 1.6cdti) i bought private last week it done 113000miles, anyway i have a mate whos done a diagnostic check and its showing error code p242f, checked on the net for definition, some DPF restriction, i have been told by a local mechanic that these cars have a dpf filter which can get clogged it needs cleaning or replacing, can any one shed light on this subject please.

#6 stef123

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 08:07 PM

if it was bought private you do have comeback now at least in scotland if a person has sold the vehicle from there home address and a fault is immediately present that wasnt there when you test drove the car then you can get the previous owner to pay for diagnostics if they do that is otherwise its a trading standards and a court job if its a garage take it straight back dont let them clear the code and send you on youre way it will only reappear insist on a adiagnostics and insist on it being repaired


if thats the case about buying privately, i can see issues when someone tries to claim a fault happended after 10 mins....prove it :lol:

where did you find that out? as far as im aware buying privately is 'sold as seen'?

privately sold cars need only be 'as described', which means the responsibility lies with the buyer to ensure the vehicle is ‘of satisfactory quality’ or ‘fit for purpose’

time to go ask the gf who is currently studying law...

#7 artscot79

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 09:29 PM

if thats the case about buying privately, i can see issues when someone tries to claim a fault happended after 10 mins....prove it Posted Image

where did you find that out? as far as im aware buying privately is 'sold as seen'?

privately sold cars need only be 'as described', which means the responsibility lies with the buyer to ensure the vehicle is ‘of satisfactory quality’ or ‘fit for purpose’

time to go ask the gf who is currently studying law...



trading standars will tell you in scotland there is no such thing as sold as seen and its illegal for a garage to advertise a vehicle as sold as seen ive seen a nissan garage do it the n when i qouted trading standards they changed it garages rely on customer ignoirance as you said prove it is exactly the problem though we have a comeback the problem is proving it but if you bought a car and there was a major fault even privqately and it wasnt disclosed and a mechanic can state the problem existed before you had the car then you have the proof. never buy motors from guys down the pub my mates a trader and done that 2 days later the cops turned up it was stolen even though all the documents etc checked out and a vehicle check hadnt been reported yet as the guy nicked it from his aunt while she was on holiday.the diesel particulate filters do eventually need cleaned but its not somethig imaware that you can do yopureself there are many companies who do it for you if its clogged it will cause back pressure and poor running

#8 stef123

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 09:41 PM

trading standars will tell you in scotland there is no such thing as sold as seen and its illegal for a garage to advertise a vehicle as sold as seen ive seen a nissan garage do it the n when i qouted trading standards they changed it garages rely on customer ignoirance as you said prove it is exactly the problem though we have a comeback the problem is proving it but if you bought a car and there was a major fault even privqately and it wasnt disclosed and a mechanic can state the problem existed before you had the car then you have the proof. never buy motors from guys down the pub my mates a trader and done that 2 days later the cops turned up it was stolen even though all the documents etc checked out and a vehicle check hadnt been reported yet as the guy nicked it from his aunt while she was on holiday.the diesel particulate filters do eventually need cleaned but its not somethig imaware that you can do yopureself there are many companies who do it for you if its clogged it will cause back pressure and poor running


that may be the case for a garage but not as a private seller. buying privately gives you less rights and you consiquently buy the car as seen. the seller has a duty to be honest but if hes not then tough. if the car has been nicked or has finance on it then that different because the car belongs to someone else

caveat emptor - buyer beware :)

#9 artscot79

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 09:54 PM

that may be the case for a garage but not as a private seller. buying privately gives you less rights and you consiquently buy the car as seen. the seller has a duty to be honest but if hes not then tough. if the car has been nicked or has finance on it then that different because the car belongs to someone else caveat emptor - buyer beware Posted Image

. The car must be as described, but the other rules don't apply. If a private seller lies about the condition of a car, you can sue for your losses - if you can find the seller. Some dealers pretend to be private sellers to avoid their legal obligations and to get rid of faulty or over-priced cars. They advertise in local newspapers and shop windows. Warning signs to look out for include:

  • Adverts which give a mobile phone number or specify a time to call (it may be a public phone box, not the seller's home).
  • The same phone number appears in several adverts.
  • When you phone about the car, the seller asks "Which one?".
  • The seller wants to bring the car to you or meet you somewhere, rather than you going to the seller's home.
  • When you get to the sellers home and there seem to be a lot of cars for sale on the street
If the seller is really a dealer, then your full legal rights apply.





#10 catch

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 11:26 PM

hi there, this car (ford focus 1.6cdti) i bought private last week it done 113000miles, anyway i have a mate whos done a diagnostic check and its showing error code p242f, checked on the net for definition, some DPF restriction, i have been told by a local mechanic that these cars have a dpf filter which can get clogged it needs cleaning or replacing, can any one shed light on this subject please.


I had a Volvo S40 with a DPF, and Ford share the same engines, as Volvo is a Ford owned company.

The DPF is down for replacing every sixth service or 75k miles which ever comes first.Every third annual service or 37.5k the additive reservoir needs topping up, and again when a new DPF is fitted at 75k. The additive is automatically added to the fuel in the tank to aid the burning off of soot particles that can block the particulate filter.

Now between those designated service requirements, if the DPF becomes blocked and you go into limp home mode. You need to take it into a Ford dealership where they can attempt what is called a "forced DPF regeneration"

Looking at your mileage, it could be that the additive which should have been topped up at 112.5k has not been done. In fact I very much doubt it has, now that can cost anything between £100 to 150, as the additive it's self is circa £65, then the engine management needs resetting, to record the fact the additive has been replenished. Now I don't want to scare you but the DPF it's self costs between £350/400 to buy from a motor factor, and remember again to add the cost of doing the additive replenishment..............well I've hear figures of £800 to £1000 for the complete job.

But with components costing circa £430 and the job taking about 1.5 hours to do, I would have thought £600 should well cover it.But I myself never needed either job doing as I only had the S40 nine months. As like you I was ignorant [until after the event of buying]of the fact these engines had DPF's So I moved the motor on [to a Ford dealership] with 64k on the clock, as my annual mileage is low and the resultant fuel savings would be wiped out by the servicing costs of having a DPF. But to be honest I wish I had not as the S40 2.0D SE was a fantastic car, with all the bells and whistles, traction, cruise, full heated leather. And the DPF is not hard to live with really, even on low mileage. If you don't do regular
"spirited" motorway driving, all you need to do is burn it up a dual carriage way for about 15 minutes every 300 miles to aid "DPF regeneration"

Of course yours is a different story completely, you have been stuffed from the start. In that a private seller has sold you a 55 plate on 113k. That will have had in all probability neither the additive or the DPF replaced as per service schedule.

Are you sure he is not a trader posing as a private seller ? Because if you can prove he is trading in cars, he is breaking the law pretending to be a private seller, and you have him by the balls. He fixes it or you shop him to trading standards.
Did you see the V5C document[ log book] when you bought the car, and was it bought at the address of the registered keeper of the vehicle as stated on the V5C?

If you did not do the aforementioned check, the name and address of the last registered keeper will appear on the front page of the V5C when you get it back from the DVLA. Write to him or find his home telephone number via directory enquires, and ask about the service history of the car, and who he sold it to. If he it ain't the guy you bought it from, then the guy you bought from is more than likely a trader.

AA DPF fact sheet

Honest John DPF discussion

So basically

37.5k additive top up
75k DPF replacement and top up
112.5k additive top up
150k DPF replacement and top up

and so on

Do keep us informed how you go on with this problem, as we are all here to help one another. And by learning by our mistakes, it makes us all more knowlagable, like me in my case supplying you with links appertaining to DPF problems.

#11 artscot79

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 11:32 PM

I had a Volvo S40 with a DPF, and Ford share the same engines, as Volvo is a Ford owned company.

The DPF is down for replacing every sixth service or 75k miles which ever comes first.Every third annual service or 37.5k the additive reservoir needs topping up, and again when a new DPF is fitted at 75k. The addative is automatically added to the fuel in the tank to aid the burning off of soot particles that can block the particulate filter.

Now between those designated service requirements, if the DPF becomes blocked and you go into limp home mode. You need to take it into a Ford dealership where they can attempt what is called a "forced DPF regeneration"

Looking at your mileage, it could be that the additive which should have been topped up at 112.5k has not been done. In fact I very much doubt it has, now that can cost anything between £100 to 150, as the additive it's self is circa £65, then the engine management needs resetting, to record the fact the additive has been replenished. Now I don't want to scare you but the DPF it's self costs between £350/400 to buy from a motor factor, and remember again to add the cost of doing the additive replenishment..............well I've hear figures of £800 to £1000 for the complete job. But with components costing circa £430 and the job taking about 1.5 hours to do, I would have thought £600 should well cover it.

But then on learning about the DPF like you after the event of buying. I moved the motor on [to a Ford dealership] with 64k on the clock, as my annual mileage is low and the resultant fuel savings would be wiped out by the servicing costs of having a DPF


AA DPF fact sheet

Honest John DPF discussion

So basically

37.5k additive top up
75k DPF replacement and top up
112.5k additive top up
150k DPF replacement and top up

and so on



!Removed! hell whats the point buying diesel at those prices ive heard of lorry drivers putting an additive in but i wasnt aware that these new diesel cars are using the system expensive system i have to say

#12 stef123

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 11:46 PM

. The car must be as described, but the other rules don't apply. If a private seller lies about the condition of a car, you can sue for your losses - if you can find the seller. Some dealers pretend to be private sellers to avoid their legal obligations and to get rid of faulty or over-priced cars. They advertise in local newspapers and shop windows. Warning signs to look out for include:

  • Adverts which give a mobile phone number or specify a time to call (it may be a public phone box, not the seller's home).
  • The same phone number appears in several adverts.
  • When you phone about the car, the seller asks "Which one?".
  • The seller wants to bring the car to you or meet you somewhere, rather than you going to the seller's home.
  • When you get to the sellers home and there seem to be a lot of cars for sale on the street
If the seller is really a dealer, then your full legal rights apply.


i have heard about the dealers trying to pull a fast one and act as a private seller, never come across one though.

if the private seller lies about the condition of the car, the buyer should be able to spot this. whos to say the seller knows about the fault and just so happens the next day it rears its head after someone has bought. whos at fault at here, its a genuine 'didnt know' but no one can prove or disprove this to have any come back.
i think if anyone is buying a car privately then they must have their wits about them and take into consideration that the seller may not be truly honest.

#13 artscot79

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 11:55 PM

i have heard about the dealers trying to pull a fast one and act as a private seller, never come across one though.

if the private seller lies about the condition of the car, the buyer should be able to spot this. whos to say the seller knows about the fault and just so happens the next day it rears its head after someone has bought. whos at fault at here, its a genuine 'didnt know' but no one can prove or disprove this to have any come back.
i think if anyone is buying a car privately then they must have their wits about them and take into consideration that the seller may not be truly honest.

round my way theres quite a few that buy cheap cars from auctions tart themn up and sell them at the side of the road under the law they are classed as dealers even though they are just trying to make a quick buck ive had to fix a few of these cars bought by the road side and ive seen a few so bad they have been towed to the scrappy guy came in with a hyundai accent coupe nice car looking inside and around it looked fine till you removed the engine tray and found the crossmember was actually split in 2 rear engine mount was snapped anti roll bar link snapped various other bits it had been in an accidebnt where who ever clearlky went off the road and hit a rock or summat instead of declaring it they replaced the bumper with a second hand one and put a new undertray on covering all the evidence up then put it through the auction thats just one example personally my dad always taught me what to do i probably annoy people if im looking at car for anyone as i keep going round it till im happy if i have doubts i walk away ive always found if they have summat to hide and you say you want an aa or rac check done they arent interested so i only use garages or dealers far more come back with them and its peace of mind you know it isnt nicked or hiding some major damage thats been covered up

#14 catch

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 01:00 AM

!Removed! hell whats the point buying diesel at those prices ive heard of lorry drivers putting an additive in but i wasnt aware that these new diesel cars are using the system expensive system i have to say



There is a new DPF on cars from 2008 onwards I think. It does not need replacing every 75K nor does it use additive, see bottom of that Honest John link. But I don't think you can add it as a retro fit the older cars using the older DPF.

Of course if your living in Germany then Ford will offer you a cheap retro fit deal [circa £144] for other reasons See Here

#15 sid777

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 04:04 AM

thanks for the info, i think i have messed this one up buying this car, looking at all them costs i am gona need a morgage, but anyway my mate has erased the error codes with a obd2 and its come out of limp mode so i have give it a good run, im not sure if it has cleared the dpf as i still feel some judders when you change gear an exelerate but it is better than limp mode, any idea where the additive reservoir is? also if you could addvise on the procedure on "forced dpf regeneration" which would be quite helpful thanks, well that guy i bought this car off was definately a trader as he mention the log book is registered in some other address and hes selling this as it was taken in p/x, it also has full dealer history im gona enquire with ford dealers on these service stamps and what was done to the car while being serviced, as i have not been given any list of works done to this car timing belt or dpf change, but i dont really wana go down the route of contacting trading standards, i should of done my homework before buying a deisal car as ive always stuck to petrol and not had problems. i was trying to be economical. :(

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