Jump to content


Photo

Help With Clutch Problem


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 joolstdi

joolstdi

    Member

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Ford Model: fusion 2 1.4 tdci in black

Posted 29 September 2010 - 03:21 PM

Hi all i need your help and expertise, i have recently bought
a fusion 2 1.4 tdci with on 35k on the clock genuine miles.

car is a 04 plate car.

I have had a few niggles with the car which i am slowly going through.

The clutch on the car is nice and light and it gets into all gears
as it should, but the clutch bites right at the top end of the pedal!!!
it does not slip but its on a hair trigger right at the top of the pedal.

Is this normal for the car as i am not use to it yet.
Or is this a comman fault with this car.

can the clutch be adjusted or is it a fixed clutch.

Or do i need a new clutch, if so how much are they.

please give me your thoughts.

joolstdi

Have something to contribute?

Sign in or register to start a topic...

Sign up to FOC Premium Membership To Remove These Ads

#2 MrrNoName

MrrNoName

    MrrNoName

  • New Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 200 posts
  • Ford Model: Focus Titanium
  • Location:

Posted 29 September 2010 - 04:52 PM

What you describe is not a "problem" just signs of a worn out clutch.

35K is soon for the clutch to become so worn but it depends on the previous driver (a clutch can be worn out in no time at all if the driver constantly slips it and has poor control)

as far as im aware the clutch is auto adjusting and cannot be manually adjusted, but im not 100% sure on the fusion.

Although having the bite at the very top of the pedal can make it slightly more difficult to drive, I wouldent look into replacing it until its actually slipping as clutches can go on for a long time (years) if used correctly, even when they are 90% worn out.

put the car into first gear with the handbrake on and gently lift the clutch up, then re-press it as soon as you feel the car begin to lurch forward (at the same time gauging the level on the pedal where it bites). I find this gives a much more accurate level of clutch wear then when your driving. obviously try not to do this too often as you are wearing the clutch when performing this test.

Not sure at the price of a new clutch but as a guestimate 350? depends on where its done really

#3 paul-eb

paul-eb

    Member

  • New Member
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • Ford Model: ford Fusion 1.4 tdci
  • Location:

Posted 30 September 2010 - 08:20 AM

What you describe is not a "problem" just signs of a worn out clutch.

35K is soon for the clutch to become so worn but it depends on the previous driver (a clutch can be worn out in no time at all if the driver constantly slips it and has poor control)

as far as im aware the clutch is auto adjusting and cannot be manually adjusted, but im not 100% sure on the fusion.

Although having the bite at the very top of the pedal can make it slightly more difficult to drive, I wouldent look into replacing it until its actually slipping as clutches can go on for a long time (years) if used correctly, even when they are 90% worn out.

put the car into first gear with the handbrake on and gently lift the clutch up, then re-press it as soon as you feel the car begin to lurch forward (at the same time gauging the level on the pedal where it bites). I find this gives a much more accurate level of clutch wear then when your driving. obviously try not to do this too often as you are wearing the clutch when performing this test.

Not sure at the price of a new clutch but as a guestimate 350? depends on where its done really



As MrrNoName says the clutch is probably ok. My Fusion also has a clutch that engages near the top of the pedal movement, my car has only 20,000 miles and i do NOT ride the clutch, this is probably a trait of the car.

Hope this helps a little.

Paul.


Not what you're looking for?

Register now, we have a huge community of enthusiasts to answer any questions you might have



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users