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Tdci Cold Start


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#1 Muskydo

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 07:38 PM

Hi folks, I've had my 1.4 tdci since December and up to now very pleased, we have had lot's of below zero mornings since I bought it and the car starts very well after a few turns, however Friday 3rd of Feb the gauge showed minus 8 and after a few attempts the car failed to start , it was only when I sat back and thought BUGGER that I noticed a light on the dash that I hadn't seen before, and yes sure enough it was heater lamp warning that had not lit up before. So on waiting the few seconds for the lamp to go out tried to start it again and away it went no problem, the following day (today) it was minus 5 no heater lamp this time and the car started as normal, conclusion is that the heater plugs are not required except in extreme temps. Anybody else experienced this?
Cheers
Steve

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#2 Lenny

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 07:51 PM

Hi mate,
ive driven in -12 conditions last year and noticed the light on the dash back then, also diesel has addatives that turn to a sort of wax at temperatures below -2 so this will clog up in the fuel filter and limit your power in -2 conditions and below, however this wont be that noticable because in those conditions your not exactly going to be pushing hard.

and when the temperature picks back up to +1 etc. the diesel additives turn to liquid again, and its the same reaction in all diesel engines not just our fords. because Diesel is a mix of hydrocarbons, and the components have different freezing points.

For Number 2 diesel, as the ambient temperatures drop toward 32 degrees F (0 degrees C), it begins to cloud, due to the paraffin in the fuel solidifying. As the temperatures drop below 32 F, the molecules combine into solids, large enough to be stopped by the filter. This is known as the gel point, and generally occurs about 15 degrees F (-9.5 degrees C) below the cloud point.

This wax then forms a coating on the filter which results in a loss of engine power.
The same thing happens on starting an engine when the temperature is below freezing.
The filter becomes almost instantly coated with wax - usually, enough fuel gets through to allow the engine to idle, but not attain operating RPM. There are two common ways to overcome this: one is a diesel additive, the other is a fuel heater."

#3 Lenny

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 07:59 PM

If you are experiencing it to the extent it is becoming a problem mate, their are additives on the market that can be used to prevent the freezing within the fuel such as this one in the link below:
http://www.ebay.co.u...=item3f0e17564e
or this one, is more pocket friendly and the additive will last for 4 tanks of fuel or 200ltr's
http://www.ebay.co.u...=item27c27125fb

#4 Lez

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 08:19 PM

put 1-2 liter petrol with a full tank diesel, unfortunately in this country they do not sell winter diesel....

#5 Stoney871

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 02:30 AM

We used to add petrol to the Diesel tanks of land rovers when i was in the Military.
Small amounts don't cause a problem but helps to keep the diesel from freezing.
We also used to use field kitchen propane burners to warm the tanks in extreme cold weather but i really wouldn't recommend that for you.
I'm pretty sure most ford fuel tanks are plastic now.

#6 mintalkin

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:23 AM

it sounds like the glow plugs are working when the car requires them hence the car started,most refinaries will start blending and delivering winter grade diesel from october onwards, i can not remember the last time i had a diesel car not start due to the fuel waxing.

#7 stef123

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 11:08 AM

adding petrol to the diesel on a modern common rail is the first way to strip the high pressure pump of its lubrication and shorten its life span.

From what i've gathered and experienced, unlike older diesels, common rails rarely need the heater plugs unless very cold.

I agree with mintalkin, winter diesel is usually supplied from october. I believe that regulations state it must remain liquid at -15 degrees?

#8 Lenny

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 11:17 AM

We used to add petrol to the Diesel tanks of land rovers when i was in the Military.
Small amounts don't cause a problem but helps to keep the diesel from freezing.
We also used to use field kitchen propane burners to warm the tanks in extreme cold weather but i really wouldn't recommend that for you.
I'm pretty sure most ford fuel tanks are plastic now.


Lmao i can imagine the results if anyone does decide to warm their plastic fuel tank with a bunsen burner, please add a direct link to you tube on it :lol:

P.S. To the person trying to heat their fuel tank: Good Bye! thank you for being a member of FOC.

#9 Muskydo

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 01:13 PM

Thanks for all the info, it's obviously quite a technical issue, hopefully temps like -8 are few and far between as I've had no problems at higher freezing temps (does that last statement make sense?). Not sure if I should own up to this but my other daily driver is a Morris Ital pickup 32 years old and has never ever lets me down!
Cheers
Steve

#10 Lenny

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 01:30 PM

Thanks for all the info, it's obviously quite a technical issue, hopefully temps like -8 are few and far between as I've had no problems at higher freezing temps (does that last statement make sense?). Not sure if I should own up to this but my other daily driver is a Morris Ital pickup 32 years old and has never ever lets me down!
Cheers
Steve


Nice!
if you get a momment mate upload a picture of the Pick up.

#11 Muskydo

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:15 PM

http://i162.photobuc...do/PIC_0018.jpg

Not sure if this as worked but should be picture of my daily driver 1983 Morris Ital Pickup with "mildly" tuned engine that catches out quite a few chancers.

http://i162.photobuc...do/PIC_0006.jpg

This is my latest project that is undergoing a full resto which will include original engine with BMW k1200 16v fuel injected cylinder head, shown to easily produce around 120bhp so will definately keep up with the traffic

#12 Lenny

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:53 PM

Posted Image
Not sure if this as worked but should be picture of my daily driver 1983 Morris Ital Pickup with "mildly" tuned engine that catches out quite a few chancers.



Posted ImageThis is my latest project that is undergoing a full resto which will include original engine with BMW k1200 16v fuel injected cylinder head, shown to easily produce around 120bhp so will definately keep up with the traffic


looking good mate, the rims suit the morris beautifully,

#13 Muskydo

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:43 PM

Thanks 14" Revolutions with 175-60-14's improve the handling and allow it to corner at quite surprising speeds, and as I said earlier so reliable with the most basic technology and NO electronics to spoil your day!
Cheers
Steve

#14 Lenny

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:47 PM

Thanks 14" Revolutions with 175-60-14's improve the handling and allow it to corner at quite surprising speeds, and as I said earlier so reliable with the most basic technology and NO electronics to spoil your day!
Cheers
Steve


dodge viper style exhaust pipes would look sweet on the morris too mate, ;)
chrome pipe running along the side and then curl outwards just before the rear arches.

#15 dLockers

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 05:15 PM

Lmao i can imagine the results if anyone does decide to warm their plastic fuel tank with a bunsen burner, please add a direct link to you tube on it :lol:

P.S. To the person trying to heat their fuel tank: Good Bye! thank you for being a member of FOC.

Heated fuel tanks are very common in Nordics where temps drop extremely low.

This is especially the case where people use veg oil as that has a higher freezing temp than diesel (bio fuel etc).

The icon is the glow plugs, you will rarely see it. It is heating up the block to aid detonation.

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