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Dpf Delete On The Cheap < 1 - Experiments


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#1 ajt

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 06:42 PM

I'm going to see how far I can get with a diy dpf delete.

By this I mean fool the ECU into thinking the DPF is operating normally, when infact it has been drilled/replaced with straight pipe. This would not get around the EOYLS additive problem, but that is small fish compared to new dpf.

I have already worked out the pressure sensor SIM needs to be a 10.5K and 4.2k resistors, so I thought I would disconnect the DPF pressure sensor and get the MIL light before attaching the SIM (assumed it would be instant, but not so). After I get the MIL light I will attach the SIM. The MIL Light should then go out and stay out.

Next I will be on the lookout for a drilled out DPF or straight pipe (hint, hint), to replace my fully functioning (why destroy it) dpf.

 

 

EDIT: ONE YEAR ON

This went no where, as I could not force a DPF fault. Then last week whilst repairing turbo found welded patch on side of DPF. It had already been removed unbeknownst to me! Still think my theory is sound though!



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#2 salsheikh

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 07:55 PM

mate, why dont you get into contact with Nick at R-Tech in Hinckley who custom maps cars and offers a DPF delete and removal. If this is out of the question then try Custom Chrome in Nuneaton for a piece of pipe to replace the DPF, they can do the fitting for you too.

#3 ajt

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 08:43 PM

No offence, but I think you missed the point of my post
I have no problem with my current system, but I am the inquisitive type. I don't want to pay 2-400 quid, when at the end of the day it's probably an hours labour to replace the pipe.
Then hookup to diagnostic kit to disable the sensor alarm. This is the bit that I think could be done for less than a pound, maybe :)

#4 markw96

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 09:43 PM

mate, why dont you get into contact with Nick at R-Tech in Hinckley who custom maps cars and offers a DPF delete and removal. If this is out of the question then try Custom Chrome in Nuneaton for a piece of pipe to replace the DPF, they can do the fitting for you too.


I emailed R-Tech in Hinckley weeks ago concerning this matter and never even recieved a reply so i definetly wont be bothering with them again.

#5 Mozo Jojo

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:30 PM

ajt, you are on the right path mate :)

Good luck. the system work like a charm, but as i am not that good with electronics/electrics, i had to pay for it. Doesn't matter, it works :)
As an advice, try and put a heat shield on the components, and you will be good to go.

#6 tomo2001

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 03:41 PM

What happens at MOT time ?

#7 ajt

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 04:36 PM

What happens at MOT time ?


I think on diesels its just a visual out the exhuast, i.e. no black smoke.

#8 Barry_

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 05:17 PM

I think on diesels its just a visual out the exhuast, i.e. no black smoke.


LOL - I doubt the very much!!!! - My 1.8 TDCI (these TDCI's don't have DPF's) smokes like a trouper - not noticable most of the time - mainly at night in rear view mirror in following cars headlamps, but still as they say "No smoke, No poke LOL) - Ok its not like constant smoke like, but stick your foot down and you see the puffs behind you.... BUT when my motor had its MOT last - about 2 mths ago - its passed the emissions test with flying colours - the levels were so low that it nearly didn't even register - Chap said if it was possible to get them re-classed then my car tax would reduce to pretty much zero LOL (wishful thinking there!!!)

#9 ajt

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 05:42 PM

OK slightly more scientific than looking for black smoke, but basicaly correct ;)

Had my MOT in the last couple of weeks, and just checked it.

A metered smoke test is performed, and a pass is an avergae of 1.5 1/m (mine was 0.83 1/m).

Ripped the following from a pdf leaflet

Metered Smoke Test (Diesel)
The metered smoke test has been conducted in
EU countries for many years. During this test, a
calibrated smoke meter is used to assess the
density of the smoke from compression ignition
(

diesel) engined vehicles.
The engine will be accelerated up to governed
speed and the smoke density measured.
Engines that emit very little smoke and achieve
a meter reading of

1.5m-1 or less will pass the
test after the first acceleration. However, if the
test is not passed on the first acceleration a
further two accelerations will be carried out.
The average of the three acceleration readings
will be calculated and if the reading is at or
below

2.5m-1 for non-turbocharged engines
or

3.0m-1 for turbocharged engines, the
vehicle will pass this element of the test.
However, if the average is higher, a further
acceleration will be carried out, and the average
of the last three readings will be calculated. This
will continue up to a maximum of six
accelerations. If the average of the fourth, fifth
and sixth accelerations is higher than the
appropriate level, the vehicle will not pass the
test.
In addition, vehicles may be refused a
certificate if the exhaust emits excessive smoke
or vapour, to an extent likely to obscure vision.
A metered smoke test will not be carried out if:



The exhaust tail pipe is damaged or an
accessory is fitted which prevents
insertion of the smoke meter probe.



The exhaust system is extensively
fractured or holed.



There are obvious signs of an engine
defect such as an unusual noise or
emission of excessive smoke.



There is an insufficient or excessive
amount of oil in the engine or, low
engine oil pressure, which could cause
engine damage if the engine is
accelerated.



There are obvious signs that the
governors have been tampered with or
are not operating.



The vehicle owner / presenter cannot
confirm that the vehicle has been
properly maintained, the camshaft drive
belt has been replaced at the
recommended intervals and the engine
is in a suitable condition for testing.
In the above circumstances where a metered
smoke test is not carried out, the vehicle will fail
the test.
Note: It is important that vehicles are
properly maintained prior to testing
(including changing of the camshaft drive
belts in accordance with the manufacture

r’s
recommendation) and presented for test at
normal working temperature. This may
require the engine to be kept running prior
to the start of the test.

#10 salsheikh

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 06:35 PM

I emailed R-Tech in Hinckley weeks ago concerning this matter and never even recieved a reply so i definetly wont be bothering with them again.


always best to ring him, i know sometimes he works away and doesnt access his emails. I'll have a word and get him to pull his finger out!

#11 artscot79

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 06:48 PM

Its a mod from standard so the insurance has to know theres unclarified issues as to how it effects the tax band.

The dpf data strings are embedded deep in the ecu connected to exhaust gas temp sensor the lambda sensoq the differential pressure sensor and a lot more its not as easy as whack a resistoq on and hey presto.

And though dpf removal as yet isnt ilegal fitting a straight through pipe is these companies arent to blame as its the owners responsibility to ensure the car passes the soot test and just because it does now doesnt mean it will later.

It is said like america it may become law and tested during an m.o.t

If it were as easy as you think these companies would be out of business some issues with deleted dpfs by companies are cropping up from ecu glitches car not starting excessive smoke car going into limp mode so beware folks

#12 ajt

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 07:43 PM

Does any one actually read my original post?

@artscot79
Quote
"The dpf data strings are embedded deep in the ecu connected to exhaust gas temp sensor the lambda sensoq the differential pressure sensor and a lot more its not as easy as whack a resistoq on and hey presto."

Can you post a link to where you found this information. Might be useful in working out what needs to be done.

Quote
"And though dpf removal as yet isnt ilegal..." yet your original post (before editing) you stated (as in fact) that it was illegal, so before posting in a way that implies knowledge, please state opinion or fact.

Your point about tax I fully see (had already considered it myself). Tax band being based on emissions control system, but as I state in the title of the thread and in original post I AM EXPERIMENTING. For all I know my car may have already had a DPF delete done to it. Can't get the check engine light to come on with the DPF pressure sensor coming on.

Quote
"If it were as easy as you think..." you ASSUME i'm not a genius or idiot savant, yet you don't know me! Beside that when did I say it was easy. If it was easy, I wouldn't bother.

#13 stef123

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 07:59 PM

the tax is based on co2 emissions? hence why diesels are cheaper on tax..shouldnt affect this surely?

#14 artscot79

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 09:39 PM

i never implied anyone was an idiot so wind it in a bit mate i stated its not that easy .

as for the data strings the info is from a ford mechanic who looked into doing the same from his car and spoke to an expert sent from ford to look at someones car that had issues as it was stated to him you need inside know how as to how and what yu can delete within the files in the ecu to which he would not provide, the list of sensors its linked to is quite extensive he was informed the customer in question had a company do an ecu upgrade and the dpf deleted a few months later the car went into limp mode the company who did the work had no idea what was wrong and it was the fact that the sensors were registering faults as the dpf regen information was still in the ecu confusing the whole thing.

as he stated the equipment used by these companies is quite amateur they remap the ecu with pre programmed maps based on that model of car but ford update ecus all the time so the info in each cars ecu is different the end result was a dpf had to be refitted to clear the issue as they had no idea what was done to the ecu the company luckily reverted it back to normal and all was fine

removing the dpf is not illegal as vosa state however tampering with emission systems that define a vehicles tax band are, its like you can buy cannabis seeds but cant grow them so its legal not to have a dpf but not legal to tamper with emission systems or put a straight through pipe in but people do and thats up to them personally if a dpf is an issue dont buy a diesel.

as for experimenting thats great but it gives people ideas thet they can do the same as you and there car will be fine some people will just jump at it and copy you without finding out what you have discovered in the process.

#15 ajt

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:01 PM

@artscot79
So still no links to any definitive information on how the Ford dpf regen system works. Just a very confusing read about some hearsay.

OK here goes, this is MY theory on how it MIGHT work, from reading a lot of posts on various forums and white papers on diesel engines.

The ECU detects a blocked DPF by the voltage supplied from the voltage divider from the pressure sensor.

IF the ECU decides the DPF is above a certain threshold of blockage then it tries to start a regen. AT THIS POINT all the other sensors come into play as to wether or not the conditons are right to start regen, most importantly exhaust temperature high enough.

So don't let the ECU think that the dpf is blocked, which it can't be if its been replaced with stright pipe. This is where the 10.5K/4.2K resistors across the pressure sesnor plug come in (fool the ECU into thinking pressure sensor is attached and dpf is not above thresh hold.

The EOYLS which is added to the tank every time more than 5l of diesel is added, could just be topped up with diesel, and I think i have read about a procedure to reset the EOYLS level with a bit of whitch craft if you do it as soon as a warning is shown on the dash.

So based on the above no ECU programming required, just let the ECU carry on monitoring a striaght pipe that will never be blocked, giving the ECU readings that a proper dpf (that wasn't blocked) would give, so as to not trigger any faults. Let the ECU keep dosing the diesel tank with EOYLS and replace with diesel in 3-6 years depending on how many miles you drive.

As I said it's only a theory.

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