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jeffnat68

Long Term Effects Of Egr Blanking.....

71 posts in this topic

Is there a handy guide for blanking the egr?

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Not realy.

Disconnect the vacuum hose from the vacuum pump (it blocks acces to one of the fuell filter braket bolt). Unfix 3 8mm bolts on top of the fuell filter holder, disconnect the hoses going in the fuelfilter (press the locking clip, and pull) and disconnect the connector on fuell filter. Lift the fuell filter off. Unfix the 3 8mm bolts holding the fuell filter braket. Now you should be able to see, and have acces to the EGT. Near the EGR connector you find one 8mm bolt on top of the EGR unit, and one 8mm under the egr. Loosen up the bolt, but dont pull them out, the seal will drop off. When you got the bolt loose, you see that the seal has small "ear" that you can get grab on using pliers. Grab the seal, and pull out the bolts so that the seal gets free.

Use the seal as template to make the blanking plate, or install preordered blanking plate.

The EGR Unit is also fixed on the another end by 1 10mm bolt. You dont need to unfix this, if you cant get the seal out after pulling the bolts off, you can bend the EGR unit backwards just a litlebit to create some clearance.

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Or save a load of hassle and by the blanking plate from Ebay for £4.50 with free p+p then do the above and just back the egr bolts off and you slip the plate in without taking the egr valve off..... Nice and easy :)

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The egr is still attached by the 10mm bolt ~in the midle of the engine after you unfix those 8mm bolts. So the EGR stays on the engine, but you get enough clearance to slide in the blanking plate / slide out the seal to make the blanking plate.

If you got some spare metal, making the blanking plate is faster the :) Just use the seal as template where to drill the fixing holes, and using metal scissors roughly cut it so shape and install it back :)

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Not realy.

Disconnect the vacuum hose from the vacuum pump (it blocks acces to one of the fuell filter braket bolt). Unfix 3 8mm bolts on top of the fuell filter holder, disconnect the hoses going in the fuelfilter (press the locking clip, and pull) and disconnect the connector on fuell filter. Lift the fuell filter off. Unfix the 3 8mm bolts holding the fuell filter braket. Now you should be able to see, and have acces to the EGT. Near the EGR connector you find one 8mm bolt on top of the EGR unit, and one 8mm under the egr. Loosen up the bolt, but dont pull them out, the seal will drop off. When you got the bolt loose, you see that the seal has small "ear" that you can get grab on using pliers. Grab the seal, and pull out the bolts so that the seal gets free.

Use the seal as template to make the blanking plate, or install preordered blanking plate.

The EGR Unit is also fixed on the another end by 1 10mm bolt. You dont need to unfix this, if you cant get the seal out after pulling the bolts off, you can bend the EGR unit backwards just a litlebit to create some clearance.

Thanks, think I just found something to do with my week off! :-)

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When the temperature goes bellow -20, you realy want to get all the possible heat to the cabin :) So, i keep mine unblankt untill summer / i get some spare money to buy eberspächer :)

But dont get me wrong, i still think the EGR is in "hall of fame" of the idiotic invention, and it should be blanked. But, i just can bear any cold, so im holding on whit my knuckles white to any heat i can get :)

You can blank the EGR without it affecting the cabin heater, just leave the EGR cooler on/ connected and blank it in-between the cooler and the valve/inlet manifold (so the EGR cooler works just as if it was unblanked)

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Is there a handy guide for blanking the egr?

i have put a link on the other page for the guide and blank...make sure the blank fits your engine as there could be different

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Anyone dyno'ed to see the effect of the EGR blanking on car's performance ? If yes, mind sharing your results ?

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Anyone dyno'ed to see the effect of the EGR blanking on car's performance ? If yes, mind sharing your results ?

I don't have charts but someone claimed + 5hp on a delete kit (the inlet was a better shape as well though)

On a mk3 Mondeo 2.2 diesel, there is a bypass kit that replaces the valve itself, it claimed an 11Hp gain

This was probably "hype" though - performance part manufacturers/ suppliers often seem to eggzagerate figures

I would not expect more than a couple of hp with just a plate though, and not at peak power, but at lower revs, on pick up/ mostly in the "EGR operation zone"

You can rest assured, there is a (small) performance advantage in blocking/ blanking/ disabling the EGR valve/ system

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I don't have charts but someone claimed + 5hp on a delete kit (the inlet was a better shape as well though)

On a mk3 Mondeo 2.2 diesel, there is a bypass kit that replaces the valve itself, it claimed an 11Hp gain

This was probably "hype" though - performance part manufacturers/ suppliers often seem to eggzagerate figures

I would not expect more than a couple of hp with just a plate though, and not at peak power, but at lower revs, on pick up/ mostly in the "EGR operation zone"

You can rest assured, there is a (small) performance advantage in blocking/ blanking/ disabling the EGR valve/ system

:) reminds me off the time my friend bought free-flow airfilter on his beemer. The box had big advertisement "+50hp!!!"... and after that were the small print "on dogve viper" or something like that :)

But, personaly i wouldnt think the powergain when bloking EGR. I would go more on the reliability, and the plain fact that combustion engines are not meant to run on theyr own exhaust. It was kinda shock when i disabled the EGR on my old mondeo, there was nice and steady 5mm layer of old exhausts going round the intake :(

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Hello, i was wondering, is there a difference about the effects of EGR blanking with a 2.0 TDCI 136 (FOCUS /C-MAX/KUGA...)?

I just disabled mine at 70000km. I've read sometime it could be bad to disable EGR, there is somtime debates on this subject. What is your opinion?

My car:

Ford Focus MK2 2007 2.0L TDCI 136.

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Hello, i was wondering, is there a difference about the effects of EGR blanking with a 2.0 TDCI 136 (FOCUS /C-MAX/KUGA...)?

I just disabled mine at 70000km. I've read sometime it could be bad to disable EGR, there is somtime debates on this subject. What is your opinion?

My car:

Ford Focus MK2 2007 2.0L TDCI 136.

The long term effects of EGR blanking are -

1 - the EGR cannot fail, so the car is more reliable

2 - the inlet manifold/ EGR and associated components stay clean/ carbon free (they dont get "gunged" up)

3 - the car is more efficient (so better performance/ economy) - so in the long run, better for the enviroment because in the lifetime of the car, less fuel in used

4 - there is less smoke from the exhaust with a solid plate fitted, so cleaner MOT emmisions and if you have a DPF, it lasts longer, before needing a regen, cleaned, or replaced

5 - i run a 2002 car, i fitted a EGR delete kit (of my own design) in about 2005, - thats 9 years ago, the car still has its original turbo, injectors etc etc, the engine is tuned/ modified from 113hp to 160+ - if anyone knows about the long term effects on EGR blanking, its me

6 - many FOC forum members have now blanked their EGRs, and reported positive results

Go ahead, fit a solid plate - its better for your car, you, your pocket, the enviroment, in the short term AND long term

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Ok thank you for your intesting informations. So what i will remember , its the same story for a focus mk2 1.8 and 2.0L Blanking EGR is always a good thing with any engine. I was wondering because the 2L is a Peugeot engine , not ford engine.

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Ok thank you for your intesting informations. So what i will remember , its the same story for a focus mk2 1.8 and 2.0L Blanking EGR is always a good thing with any engine. I was wondering because the 2L is a Peugeot engine , not ford engine.

Fitting a solid EGR blanking plate has advantages for any DIESEL engine, Ford PSA etc

With the advantages of the inlet staying clean, less smoke from the exhaust better performance/ economy, turbo spools faster, etc (turbodiesel), on any diesel engine

Some can be fitted with no problem, on others, the engine management light may come on, some owners choose to run their cars with the solid plates anyway, and ignore it or reset the light with a code reader

There was talk about "limp home mode" being triggered due to a solid plate being fitted, but this was forum scaremongering,(when asked, nobody had this actually happen, they had "heard" about it on an online forum) a faulty (eg- sticking open) EGR valve would cause this, (or a plate with holes beong fitted on a car with a faulty EGR valve) a solid plate would prevent this, a solid plate "fixes" a leaking/ jammed EGR valve by effectively disabling the EGR valve/ system

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i used to stall my car in the mornings when pulling away from traffic lights, since fitting the egr plate ive never stalled since

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Another happy EGR blank user here, fitted to the wife's '59 1.6TDCi 110 Euro5 and it drives much nicer for it. No hesitation pulling away - always had a nasty dead spot. Still to do my '58 1.6TDCi 90 Euro4 though it doesn't have the same 'need'.

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EGR Valve and Fault Code update:

The wife has been driving the Focus to and from work which is about a 6 mile run in London Traffic. The engine light came on again last night on her way home. Based on the advice above (thanks guys) I've decided not to drill a hole in the blanking plate as it was suggested it would not fix the problem.

The fault code/ engine light is something I'm going to have to live with I think.

Does anyone know of a way to stop this from happening? I'm going to try disconnecting the EGR valve solenoid plug but from what I have read that will throw up fault codes as well. A friend of mine has blanked the EGR valve on their Rangerover and had the PCM tweaked so it doesn't throw the EGR fault code. He got this done professionally but I don't know details. I have bought a TOAD software package and am going to have a play around with that and see what I can find. If I figure it out I will let you know.

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you dont mention what engine you have, but if its the 1.6 or some of the 1.8s the issue is that the commanded EGR value and the actual value are different, the ECU then throws up an error as the valve isn't doing what its supposed to be doing.

Ive seen this happen months after blanking and i think its because of previous crap building up that eventually stops it from moving or the valve itself just packs in. Replace the valve or attempt to clean it (don't think folk have had much luck with that) and it should be fine. There is no vacuum attached to the 1.6 or some 1.8s so drilling will do bugger all to help and will just allow the crap to continue to pass in to the inlet manifold. if you have a vacuum valve then taking the plate out would fix it...

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you dont mention what engine you have, but if its the 1.6 or some of the 1.8s the issue is that the commanded EGR value and the actual value are different, the ECU then throws up an error as the valve isn't doing what its supposed to be doing.

Ive seen this happen months after blanking and i think its because of previous crap building up that eventually stops it from moving or the valve itself just packs in. Replace the valve or attempt to clean it (don't think folk have had much luck with that) and it should be fine. There is no vacuum attached to the 1.6 or some 1.8s so drilling will do bugger all to help and will just allow the crap to continue to pass in to the inlet manifold. if you have a vacuum valve then taking the plate out would fix it...

I've actually posted my update to the wrong thread so apologies. Anyway the car is a 2008 Focus 2.0L tdci. I don't plan on drilling a hole as it seems highly unlikely to fix the problem. I take your point that if I did drill the hole it would put exhaust gas into the inlet manifold but with it having to pass though a 2mm hole I can't see the volume of exhaust gas being all that great so it wouldn't entirely defeat the purpose of a blanking plate.

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Yes it will - the hole will clog with carbon sooner rather than later

A blanking plate with a hole in it is pointless

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I've actually posted my update to the wrong thread so apologies. Anyway the car is a 2008 Focus 2.0L tdci. I don't plan on drilling a hole as it seems highly unlikely to fix the problem. I take your point that if I did drill the hole it would put exhaust gas into the inlet manifold but with it having to pass though a 2mm hole I can't see the volume of exhaust gas being all that great so it wouldn't entirely defeat the purpose of a blanking plate.

I have the same engine and my light kept coming on. It stayed on more times than off actually. No harm has come of it. I have changed the fuel I used to BP and/ or Shell and the light spends more time off now.

I can't imagine a six mile journey in London is going to help matters much either. I'd be more worried about your Diesel particle filter than the EGR valve.

Quilpie likes this

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