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Endless Summer

Which Engine Is In My Mk3?!

32 posts in this topic

Ladies and Gentleman,

I recently purchased a Mondeo MK3 (Lola). She has 03 reg plates but my insurance and DVLA papers show it to be a 2002 model. Before taking possession of the car I went out and bought a Haynes Manual covering Oct 2000 to Jul 2003 Mondeo.

Now I have since come to the understanding that Ford may have incrementally changed certain features of the engine (Turbo, EGR system etc) and as such, I believe that I have purchased the wrong book for my engine! I found this out today when about to fit an EGR blacking plate, she suffers form a lack of power around 1800-2200 RPM and belches a noticeable amount of smoke at this point. Upon popping the bonnet and removing the cover I discovered that my EGR valve is up the front of the engine.

I originally assumed I had a 2.0 TDCI 115 engine but am now unsure! Here is a picture of the engine bay. Can anyone identify which engine I have?

IMG_20130310_144444_m.jpg

Edit: Please ignore the filthy state of the engine bay. I haven't yet had a chance to clean it up properly!!

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You have a TDCI 2.0L with a front- mounted Pnematic EGR (Euro3 compliant or the equivelant of) VNT/ variable vane turbo with Pnumatically operated / actuator

You can see the common rail so its not a TDDI

I can't see but i presume it has a 5-speed box?, if it does the turbo pipes go over the g-box and it has a turbo resonator

There is a plate/ sticker on the left-hand side of the engine that will tell you the power output - if it says "115" it means its suposed to be 115PS - 113hp, this was to keep it within a German/ EU tax bracet and when they put "113Hp" cars on the dyno they measured 127Hp out of them, and quite a lot of torque

Surprisingly, these engines have a lot of tuning potential (up to a point)/ without spending a fortune - it is basically a shorter-stroke version of the 152Hp 2.2

The EGR can be blanked (solid,(no holes to let gasses through) stainless steel plate) with no problem

I will post up a picture of where to fit the blanking plate when i find it

You can fit 2 plates (one in the normal place and one on the cooler at the back) and remove the EGR pipe for a bit more performance/ economy and reliability

PS - the hose just under the EGR valve tends to split - this would cause lack of boost/ power and exessive smoke

post-38050-0-22463400-1362954606_thumb.j

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Hi Foca,

It is a 5-speed manual, yeah. The air intake pipe seems to come up from under the engine directly into the EGR, couldn't see the intercooler, but it was getting late and snowing...

So did Ford simply switch the location of the EGR part way through the model run, or are models with rear EGR's near the turbo just the TDDI models?

I believe the blanking plate slots in between the EGR and the pipe running horizontal in front of the engine?

Thanks!

Edit: Thanks again Foca. The hose looks tough to inspect without removing the EGR. Guess I can do this when cleaning out the intake manifold...

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also if you are having problems with the egr and black smoke, now is the time to remove it and the intake manifold if necessary to clean the soot out of them

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also if you are having problems with the egr and black smoke, now is the time to remove it and the intake manifold if necessary to clean the soot out of them

Hi Stef,

Good idea. My initial thoughts were to quickly pop the blanking plate in and see if I get smoke reduction and drop those flat spots. If I see an improvement I will then do as you suggest.

From the sounds of it I will almost need a hazchem suit for the cleaning job!

Cheers.

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Hi Stef,

Good idea. My initial thoughts were to quickly pop the blanking plate in and see if I get smoke reduction and drop those flat spots. If I see an improvement I will then do as you suggest.

From the sounds of it I will almost need a hazchem suit for the cleaning job!

Cheers.

if the egr and manifold is blocked up with soot it will restrict airflow - why you get black smoke. so you need to clean it all out and stop it happening again which is where your blanking plate comes in

it is a mucky job though

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Also, go to "vehicle enquiry" and put your reg number in. That should tell you.

https://www.taxdisc.direct.gov.uk/EvlPortalApp/app/home/intro?skin=directgov

[edit] Strike that. Thought it did, but it doesn't (at least, not for mine). Was sure it used to.

Cheers. I couldn't see detailed info there, but I do remember seeing more detailed info on some insurance quotes. Not sure if they pulled the info from a database or simply assumed year and make as I did.

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I've read that an EGR blanking plate should be off at least 2mm steel. I am only able to find aluminium ones on Ebay. Does anyone know where to buy one of steel?

Additionally, I now have a spare EGR blanking plate that suits a rear mounted system. Can't sell it on here as under 1 month etc etc so it is free to the first person who PM's me. I'm sure it wont cost me more than £1 to post and I have no use for it.

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Ignore my post above - this is what I was thinking of! https://www.etis.ford.com/vehicleRegSelector.do

If you don't see a box for registration number, click on Home, Preferences, and change country to United Kingdom, then try again.

Lovely! I thought it was the 115. Is it wrong to be glad at a slightly more powerful block!?

Mondeo 2001-2007, Duratorq DI 2.0 CR (130PS), Stardust Silver (Metallic)

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Hi Foca,

It is a 5-speed manual, yeah. The air intake pipe seems to come up from under the engine directly into the EGR, couldn't see the intercooler, but it was getting late and snowing...

So did Ford simply switch the location of the EGR part way through the model run, or are models with rear EGR's near the turbo just the TDDI models?

I believe the blanking plate slots in between the EGR and the pipe running horizontal in front of the engine?

Thanks!

Edit: Thanks again Foca. The hose looks tough to inspect without removing the EGR. Guess I can do this when cleaning out the intake manifold...

The front of the intercooler should be visible under the bumper viewed from the front, the outlet comes out on the left to the EGR/ manifold - if you remove the grille you can see the top of it

The Mondeo mk 3 TDDI (or DI) was made from 2000(1999really) untill 2002, the manuals all had 5-speed boxes,with DMF all the UK models were 115PS with a vp44 rotary pump and a tank- mounted (ocasional- high demand) lift pump, there was a 90PS (different injectors/ rotary pump/ no lift pump) version of the TDDI that was sold in Europe/ ROI - it had a solid flywheel (SMF), instead of a DMF

Some of the TDDIs / DIs had fixed vane turbos, some had VNTs, some had MAP sensors, some did not, some had a rear mounted EGR, i have been told some had the front mounted EGR but have never seen them

The Mondeo mk3 TDCI, was produced from 2000-2007, the early ones had 5-speed MTX75- boxes, later ones had the MT6 - 6speed box (mostly) all with DMFs

All the early TDCIs had 130ps engines, only after production of the TDDI ceased, was it replaced by a 115ps "budget" version of the 130ps TDCI

All types of TDCIs were produced, seemingly randomly, fixed vane turbo/ VNT with punmatic actuator/ electronic actuator front mounted EGR / rear EGR etc its hard to keep track

Just read your post - yes the 130PS version was more likely in that age and configuration of mk3 TDCI,

Are you planning any modifications or just want to get it running right?

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Cheers Foca! Such detail...

First priority is to lose this flat spot and the smoke (Hopefull simply EGR problems or intake hose, fingers crossed).

In terms of mods, I would probably only go as far as a bigger intake and KN filter. Haven't looked into how this engine deals with more air. I've only ever owned LPG or Unleaded vehicles so the TDCI is all new to me.

We bought the car to take us on a 5 month camping holiday around Europe, hence Endless Summer, so main priority is reliability and economy. But I wont say no to a little extra pickup, especially as we will be heading through Deutschland and their autobahns!!!

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Once you have sorted you problem -

The easiest, most cost- effective way of getting mode power is to fit -

A remap, (including a Bluefin) or a tuning box - the tuning box should give you a bit more bottom end than the BF, The BF more top than the TB, both should give you significantly more power/ torque than stock (20-30hp) Superchips (Bluefin) claim 164Hp and 367Nm The Blufin costs £320 (special offer) a roveron Tuning box is about £200

A replacement airbox/ air intake (that outperforms the stock one) is not available for the MK3 diesel, you would have to modify the stock one or make one from scratch

A K&N cone filter under the bonnet just looses (a lot of) power, even an (encapsulated) BMC or venom was found not to perform as well as the stock airbox, the airbox can be gas-flowed/ de-webbed and a larger inlet pipe attached, this is tricky as there is not a lot of space so i wouldent bother unless you really know what you are doing

Its highly debateable if a K&N or pipercross panel filter makes any improvement, often when someone buys and fits one, they notice an improvement because they are fitting a new, clean "performance" filter and replacing an old, clogged restrictive filter, even a cheap pattern filter (about £10) will outperform an old "performance" filter if it is new

Sometimes A K&N etc makes more noise - which can make the illusion of more power, (placibo effect)

People often fit K&Ns then forget to clean them, i fit a cheap paper filter and change it regular (at least once a year)

If the proper cleaning fluid is not used and the K&N properly oiled, it may restrict or filter badly, the oil can contaminate the MAF sensor

Even if you managed to flow more air it would not make any difference apart from the engine picking up a little better before the boost comes in and possibly make the turbo work a little less hard at full boost under a heavy load and may not increase the peak power/ torque because the compressor does most of the work, and the "bottlenecks" may be elsewhere (not the air filter element)

On balance you would be just as well leaving the air intake stock (after all, its the same as the 155PS 2.2ST-TDCI) and fitting stock or pattern paper air filters regular (6-12months)

Turbo Resonator Bypass - on many of the early 2.0L TDCIs there is a "resonator" on the outlet of the turbo compressor,(plastic or metal) this can be removed and replaced with a short rubber/ silicone tube, this helps the engine pick up better at low revs, and even seems to help the top end on mine and probably helps the turbo work less hard - the resonator is supposed to quiet-en turbo noises down, (i don't notice any difference noise wise) - the bit of silicone hose is under £20

EGR Bypass - you can completely remove the EGR system and fit a special "bypass" (its about £60) to replace the valve/ housing, it is smooth on the inside so improves flow - the egr pipe can be removed and the cooler blanked at the back - this improves power, economy and reliability

Larger Iintercooler - a larger intercooler can be fitted, the prices of then has come down and you can get a decent Chinese aluminium one for £80, or pay upto £300 for an Artech one, fitting a very large one may just add weight, and increase lag, and much of it is hidden uselessly behind the bumper anyway, fitting the right one has been found to improve performance, (mostly torque) and economy

Engine Breather Divert/ Catch Tank - the engine crancase "breathes" through a pipe that is fed into the air intake just before the turbo compressor (for emmision reasons) this injects oily spray onto the insides of the boost hoses, and especially th intercooler where it condenses, when it hits the cool insides, it also contaminates the air in the boost hoses and mixes with the carbon deposits from the EGR system, forming an oily "goo" it gets worse as the engine wears/ gets older, its known to completely coat the inside of the intercooler (it must reduce efficiency/ performance/ economy )

An oil catchtank can be fitted between the engine breather outlet on the head and the inlet before the turbo compressor, it would reduce the amount of oil/ residue reaching the intercooler/ engine etc, if it was mounted in a cool place it would work even better, (oil spray would condense) - the outlet of the catchtank could even be vented to the air - it would need to be treated like another exhaust though

With the EGR blanked/ removed and the breather bypassed, only clean, fresh air should enter the engine, the boost hoses and the intercooler EGR and inlet manifold should stay clean once they were cleaned out (only if the turbo oil seals fail would these components become contaminated)

Exhaust - The mk3 Mondeo TDCI has a CAT, this can be switched for a decat, a stainless decat is about £100, it makes a significant improvement to performance, the decats are usually 2-1/2" the rest of the exhaust is 2-1/4" (including the downpipe/ flexi) its quite easy to do and you can heat- wrap the decat (and downpipe) before it is fitted, the exhaust - back-box is very restictive and can be replaced with a straight-through muffler or straight pipe, your car should have a middle silencer so does not really need the back- box

I think that just about covers it, others have done more, including serious lightening, AC delete, electric waterpump, adjustable boost controllers, intercooler waterspray (upto 180HP 400Nm) or hybrid turbos (the stock one is not bad) bigger injectors exotoc fuel (240Hp 500Nm ) (all 2.0L) and transmission upgrades to cope with the torque/ power

For your trip a good service Oil/ filter change, fuel filter change (Ford or quality filters are best, cheap ones can cause problems) fresh air filter would be a good start - After the blanking plate/ service i would do the remap/ bluefin/ tuning box (all basically the same thing - squirts more fuel in) - this alone gives a useful gain, then the resonator bypass, then the decat, then the larger IC then the back- box, the 2 plate "EGR delete" and breather catchtank are subtle improvements, but inexpensive, the other stuff mentioned is probably not worth the hassle, on balance

Should give adequate power then for safe overtaking!

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"EGR Bypass - you can completely remove the EGR system and fit a special "bypass" (its about £60) to replace the valve/ housing, it is smooth on the inside so improves flow - the egr pipe can be removed and the cooler blanked at the back - this improves power, economy and reliability"

Is this legal and will it pass a MOT. Is the extra work, when compared to simply cleaning EGR/Manifold and blanking, actually worth it? While it be nice to have the pipe removed, do you know of anyone comparing the two methods?

"Turbo Resonator Bypass - on many of the early 2.0L TDCIs there is a "resonator" on the outlet of the turbo compressor,(plastic or metal) this can be removed and replaced with a short rubber/ silicone tube, this helps the engine pick up better at low revs, and even seems to help the top end on mine and probably helps the turbo work less hard - the resonator is supposed to quiet-en turbo noises down, (i don't notice any difference noise wise) - the bit of silicone hose is under £20"

I'll look into this one too.

It's hard to justify too much ££'s on this car, even though I have quickly fallen for the TD engine! Always thought they were for buses and trucks..... little did I know :)

Thanks Foca.

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The EGR blank at both ends costs about a fiver per blanking plate (you need 2) if you had the right nuts/bolts etc you could do it in 15 minites, the one at the back is not as accesable as the front one

MOT - only the particulates (coming out of the exhaust) are measured in the MOTon a diesel, the EGR pipe missing would probably not matter and even if it did its hidden under the engine cover, i did mine 7 / 8 years ago (total egr delete) and it has never failed due to this, actually it probably helps as the smoke is usually reduced

The egr pipe is simply a metal tube connected to the exhaust manifold, there is nothing "clever" about it its a bit like your appendix, an organ that is worse than useless waiting to burst - you are better off without it

The effect of dual plates/ pipe removal is quite subtle (not as much gain as fitting a remap/ tuning box) - the theory behind how it works is complicated to explain but here goes -

The heat- energy from the exhaust valves/ ports drives the turbo turbine, some of that energy is lost by the internal volume of the pipe and the heat lost via radiation, by removing the pipe more of that energy is available to the turbine, to help spool the turbo quicker, improving throttle response and reducing lag slightly, turbo may "come in" from lower revs and less of a "flat spot"

efficiency/ MPG is improved because this extra energy is not "wasted"

The intake stays cooler too, increasing power a little

Refinement is improved (with the egr pipe removed and the cooler blanked) because the pipe is connected to the 2nd cylinder on the manifold near the 2nd (from the left) exhaust port, it makes a "ticking" noise, like the exhaust gasket is blowing, like the engine is "missing", (this is especially bad when the EGR is working) this is because the exhaust manifold is thick and heavy cast iron (which cuts the exhaust noise of the other 3 cylinders) and the egr pipe is thin steel, which does not.

Reliability is improved because the pipe cannot leak, split or blow, and if the blank leaks or fails, you will hear it immedeately and it will not blow into the inlet (with the pipe removed inlet/ exhaust are seperated)

So with the EGR pipe removed and blanked at both ends, efficiency performance, economy, refinement and reliability is improved, these things are not improved massively, but engine should pull smoother, from lower revs and just feel "nicer" for little outlay, (£10) for a couple of plates and a bit of work

Withe the silicone for the resonator bypass costing under £20 and a breather catchtank for £30-£50 (online) you could do the 3 things (egr pipe "delete"/ resonator bypass/ breather catchtank ) for under £100 -

it would be interesting to see what this would do (performance/ economy wise) to an otherwise stock car, its mostly "eco/ clean up" rather than "big power" it may really boost the MPG

You would probably need to clean out the inside of the intercooler as well as the egr valve housing and inlet manifold

The silicone hose in your link is the right one for your car and is the one that tends to split 1st, so worth getting, its the realative movement between the chassis/ engine and the oil from the engine breather "melting"/ breaking the rubber down (another reason for the breather catchtank)

After you have fixed your car/ done work it is worth resetting the ECU (Disconnecting the battery for 30 mins so the ECU "relearns") - watch you don't loose your radio code if you do this

Yes, these cars/ engines have massive potential - it surprises a lot of people including sometimes other cars i come across if im "in a little bit of a hurry" :) - i like the handling/ balance too

Yout trip sounds like a lot of fun - especially the autobanns! - the Mondeo should be exellent for that - upto 4 people and their luggage in comfort, effortless crusing, long range between fill-ups, economical even at high(ish) speed - i envy you (its not often i say that!) but i have to stay home with my plans for word domination and all :lol:

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Once you have sorted you problem -

The easiest, most cost- effective way of getting mode power is to fit -

A remap, (including a Bluefin) or a tuning box - the tuning box should give you a bit more bottom end than the BF, The BF more top than the TB, both should give you significantly more power/ torque than stock (20-30hp) Superchips (Bluefin) claim 164Hp and 367Nm The Blufin costs £320 (special offer) a roveron Tuning box is about £200

A replacement airbox/ air intake (that outperforms the stock one) is not available for the MK3 diesel, you would have to modify the stock one or make one from scratch

A K&N cone filter under the bonnet just looses (a lot of) power, even an (encapsulated) BMC or venom was found not to perform as well as the stock airbox, the airbox can be gas-flowed/ de-webbed and a larger inlet pipe attached, this is tricky as there is not a lot of space so i wouldent bother unless you really know what you are doing

Its highly debateable if a K&N or pipercross panel filter makes any improvement, often when someone buys and fits one, they notice an improvement because they are fitting a new, clean "performance" filter and replacing an old, clogged restrictive filter, even a cheap pattern filter (about £10) will outperform an old "performance" filter if it is new

Sometimes A K&N etc makes more noise - which can make the illusion of more power, (placibo effect)

People often fit K&Ns then forget to clean them, i fit a cheap paper filter and change it regular (at least once a year)

If the proper cleaning fluid is not used and the K&N properly oiled, it may restrict or filter badly, the oil can contaminate the MAF sensor

Even if you managed to flow more air it would not make any difference apart from the engine picking up a little better before the boost comes in and possibly make the turbo work a little less hard at full boost under a heavy load and may not increase the peak power/ torque because the compressor does most of the work, and the "bottlenecks" may be elsewhere (not the air filter element)

On balance you would be just as well leaving the air intake stock (after all, its the same as the 155PS 2.2ST-TDCI) and fitting stock or pattern paper air filters regular (6-12months)

Turbo Resonator Bypass - on many of the early 2.0L TDCIs there is a "resonator" on the outlet of the turbo compressor,(plastic or metal) this can be removed and replaced with a short rubber/ silicone tube, this helps the engine pick up better at low revs, and even seems to help the top end on mine and probably helps the turbo work less hard - the resonator is supposed to quiet-en turbo noises down, (i don't notice any difference noise wise) - the bit of silicone hose is under £20

EGR Bypass - you can completely remove the EGR system and fit a special "bypass" (its about £60) to replace the valve/ housing, it is smooth on the inside so improves flow - the egr pipe can be removed and the cooler blanked at the back - this improves power, economy and reliability

Larger Iintercooler - a larger intercooler can be fitted, the prices of then has come down and you can get a decent Chinese aluminium one for £80, or pay upto £300 for an Artech one, fitting a very large one may just add weight, and increase lag, and much of it is hidden uselessly behind the bumper anyway, fitting the right one has been found to improve performance, (mostly torque) and economy

Engine Breather Divert/ Catch Tank - the engine crancase "breathes" through a pipe that is fed into the air intake just before the turbo compressor (for emmision reasons) this injects oily spray onto the insides of the boost hoses, and especially th intercooler where it condenses, when it hits the cool insides, it also contaminates the air in the boost hoses and mixes with the carbon deposits from the EGR system, forming an oily "goo" it gets worse as the engine wears/ gets older, its known to completely coat the inside of the intercooler (it must reduce efficiency/ performance/ economy )

An oil catchtank can be fitted between the engine breather outlet on the head and the inlet before the turbo compressor, it would reduce the amount of oil/ residue reaching the intercooler/ engine etc, if it was mounted in a cool place it would work even better, (oil spray would condense) - the outlet of the catchtank could even be vented to the air - it would need to be treated like another exhaust though

With the EGR blanked/ removed and the breather bypassed, only clean, fresh air should enter the engine, the boost hoses and the intercooler EGR and inlet manifold should stay clean once they were cleaned out (only if the turbo oil seals fail would these components become contaminated)

Exhaust - The mk3 Mondeo TDCI has a CAT, this can be switched for a decat, a stainless decat is about £100, it makes a significant improvement to performance, the decats are usually 2-1/2" the rest of the exhaust is 2-1/4" (including the downpipe/ flexi) its quite easy to do and you can heat- wrap the decat (and downpipe) before it is fitted, the exhaust - back-box is very restictive and can be replaced with a straight-through muffler or straight pipe, your car should have a middle silencer so does not really need the back- box

I think that just about covers it, others have done more, including serious lightening, AC delete, electric waterpump, adjustable boost controllers, intercooler waterspray (upto 180HP 400Nm) or hybrid turbos (the stock one is not bad) bigger injectors exotoc fuel (240Hp 500Nm ) (all 2.0L) and transmission upgrades to cope with the torque/ power

For your trip a good service Oil/ filter change, fuel filter change (Ford or quality filters are best, cheap ones can cause problems) fresh air filter would be a good start - After the blanking plate/ service i would do the remap/ bluefin/ tuning box (all basically the same thing - squirts more fuel in) - this alone gives a useful gain, then the resonator bypass, then the decat, then the larger IC then the back- box, the 2 plate "EGR delete" and breather catchtank are subtle improvements, but inexpensive, the other stuff mentioned is probably not worth the hassle, on balance

Should give adequate power then for safe overtaking!

FOCA,

you are the man!

I think from all the forums I have been on before that your contributions are the most concise and at the end of the day give proper answers to the question firstly asked!

Nice one m8!

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Thank you very much! - im not really that good a diagnosing faults because my main interest (surprise, surprise :) ) is tuning (especially Mk3 diesel Mondeos) - but i will try to help if i can

Its a great site/ forum here, very frendly with a great bunch of guys

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Remember if your egr is electronic etc,you'll get a EML after you blank it off most probably

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Well, cleaned out the EGR and Inlet Manifold. Blanked the EGR at the same time (Not electronic EGR so no EML light!).

No noticeable gain in power, not that I was expecting. But the smoke issues have all but gone. Well happy.

I also replaced the Intercooler-EGR hose with a silicone hose. I was hoping this would remove the whistling sound I hear when the car is boosting, but alas. My friend tells me that a bit of a whistle on turbo's is quite normal and not to worry about it. I'm still unsure. I'll try get a video/sound recording of it to get others opinions.

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Well, cleaned out the EGR and Inlet Manifold. Blanked the EGR at the same time (Not electronic EGR so no EML light!).

No noticeable gain in power, not that I was expecting. But the smoke issues have all but gone. Well happy.

I also replaced the Intercooler-EGR hose with a silicone hose. I was hoping this would remove the whistling sound I hear when the car is boosting, but alas. My friend tells me that a bit of a whistle on turbo's is quite normal and not to worry about it. I'm still unsure. I'll try get a video/sound recording of it to get others opinions.

Thats Exellen news! - glad you got it sorted

I wish mine had a wooshing sound when boosting (i cant hear it above the noise of the exhaust/ induction roar/ noise of "diesel combustion" )

The performance gain with the Blanking plate (has to be solid) is very slight, its usually between tickover to 2000rpm, it is often percieved as "less of a flat spot" or a "smoother" engine you would see it on a dyno/ rolling road, - if you were to measure/ time the pickup / roll on in a high gear from low revs,(with/ without solid plate) you would probably measure a quicker time with the plate fitted

The "pickup" / throttle response should be a little bit better too (from low revs) its quite subtle and once the turbo is "on song" the difference will probably be insignificant, it depends on you driving style and if you tend to keep the revs above 2k its very slight, you may notice a slight improvement in throttle response (the EGR only operates at certain (low) revs and often shuts off at full throttle - if it is working properly/ not leaking)

You may notice a slight increase in MPG too (driving style dependant)

If you reset the ECU before the cleanout/ fitting the EGR blank it would be worth doing it again (after) so the ECU is set up for the EGR blank, as the ECU "learns" the car may become quicker/ run even better

the whistling sound may indicate a (slight) boost leak, a "whee" noise when you lift- off/ change gear is something different (thats the exhaust)

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Cheers Foca. I reset the ECU as the battery was disconnected while I removed the parts.

Do you have any pictures of the locations of other turbo hoses? I'm not seeing anything useful in my Haynes manual and a quick google has given me mixed results.

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The routing of the hoses is different for the front mounted EGR to the rear mounted EGR, and different from the 5 speed to the 6 speed

The hoses come out of the turbo compressor (the cold/ "intake" side of the turbo) goes above the gearbox, (under the battery) to connect with the inlet (right hand) side of the intercooler (on most 5 speed mk3 TDCI mondeos) - the turbo resonator is plastic and close to the compressor

On the later (mainly 6 speed) Mondeo TDCIs, the hoses come out of the compressor, drop vertically to go under the engine/ sump to connect up to the inlet side of the intercooler

the intercooler is under the bumper

On models with a front mountet EGR (5 and 6 speed)- the hoses come out of the outlet of the intercooler and into the EGR/ inlet manifold

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Can I check for inlet/turbo leaks by spraying propellant (Carb cleaner!?) in different areas and listening for engine idle increase?

Or am I stuck to listening for a whisle or visible leak only?

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