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Clutch On A 52 Plate 1.4Tdci


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#1 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 05:40 AM

Morning all,

Got a strange problem with the clutch pedal on the fiesta. Seems to be when I haven't driven the car for a while (usually first thing in the morning when cold).

So I get in the car start it up, then press on the pedal I get a *Twang* from the pedal and it goes limp....... Like a cable has snapped and there is nothing. It doesn't engage the clutch you can't drive.

Pumping the pedal does nothing - it doesn't work.

Turn the engine off, turn it back on.

It works :) happy days!

But it feels very tight, now I'm not sure if this just the clutch burning out, or what? Any ideas would be very welcome. My mechanic is doing the timing belt so I imagine with everything out it'll be easier to change the clutch without too much added cost (it's a mate) so if that needs doing would rather just get it all sorted!

Cheers all.

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#2 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 05:46 AM

It's just happened for time when driving now as well -.- get the feeling it'll be a new clutch

#3 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:11 AM

Definitely the clutch.....it's just stopped working

#4 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 07:37 AM

Well might be the cable / ratchet but I won't know till I can get under it lol

#5 Gombal

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:00 AM

Your clutch controls are hydraulic so maybe just a leaky cilinder (internally). Clutch master cilinder gets it's hydraulic fluid from the brake fluid reservoir.

Definitely not a cable cause there is no cable ;)

When in gear, does the clutch slip when revving the motor? If not it won't be your clutch. Could also be the slave cilinder with the thrustbearing. If it's the latter it's just as much work as changing the whole clutch, your gearbox has to come off. Then it's worth considering changing the clutch also but that's something you will have to consider. Would be a shame if now only the slavecilinder and thrustbearing were changed and not after long your clutch would go. I know what i would do but i can't speak for you. (finances, time, space, etc)

 

The timing belt is on the other side of the engine and is fairly easy to change, just did mine last week.



#6 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:46 AM

Your clutch controls are hydraulic so maybe just a leaky cilinder (internally). Clutch master cilinder gets it's hydraulic fluid from the brake fluid reservoir.

Definitely not a cable cause there is no cable ;)

When in gear, does the clutch slip when revving the motor? If not it won't be your clutch. Could also be the slave cilinder with the thrustbearing. If it's the latter it's just as much work as changing the whole clutch, your gearbox has to come off. Then it's worth considering changing the clutch also but that's something you will have to consider. Would be a shame if now only the slavecilinder and thrustbearing were changed and not after long your clutch would go. I know what i would do but i can't speak for you. (finances, time, space, etc)

 

The timing belt is on the other side of the engine and is fairly easy to change, just did mine last week.

 

 

Alright mate,

 

I just looked into it and found out that the clutch is hydraulic lol. 

 

The clutch has slipped a little bit, but not too bad.....used to have a Zafira, and the clutch went on that but slipped for ages.

 

TBH I can pick a clutch up for £60-70 and my mate will probably fit it fairly cheap. Guessing this is the best option then?



#7 Gombal

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:33 AM

If you change the clutch it's the same story regarding the slave cilinder/thrustbearing. Better do all in one go but as written before, i can't decide for you.

The problem is you can't see if the slavecilinder is still gonna hold a few years or a few days/months, otherwise it was easy and you could see when to change it.

Nice you have a mate who can do it, i'll have to do it myself if my clutch dies or spend a lot of money to get it done.

Hope when it dies it's in summer cause i will have to do it outside ;)



#8 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 11:57 AM

If you change the clutch it's the same story regarding the slave cilinder/thrustbearing. Better do all in one go but as written before, i can't decide for you.

The problem is you can't see if the slavecilinder is still gonna hold a few years or a few days/months, otherwise it was easy and you could see when to change it.

Nice you have a mate who can do it, i'll have to do it myself if my clutch dies or spend a lot of money to get it done.

Hope when it dies it's in summer cause i will have to do it outside ;)

Alright mate, 

 

OK apologies my knowledge is basic when it comes to mechanics......I can service my own car, do the brakes but that about it. when we go into clutches and cam belts that's passed me. 

 

if he looks at everything when he drops it out later, will he be able to see if there is a problem with a cylinder / bearing? or is it just a case of maybe it is maybe it isn't.

 

Just trying to get an idea of cost etc.

 

Thanks 

 

Bowsa

 

Looking at it further I think it might be the master cylinder behind the pedal......Though I am not sure why this would be affected by the car being turned on / off?



#9 Mike77

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:00 PM

Funny no-one has mentioned changing the flywheel at the same time as the clutch. Thought it was common practice these days. That's if the clutch does indeed need replacing !!!

#10 Bowsa

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:05 PM

Funny no-one has mentioned changing the flywheel at the same time as the clutch. Thought it was common practice these days. That's if the clutch does indeed need replacing !!!

 

 

thats right you keep adding the £'s  :unsure:

 

Fingers crossed my mate will get back to me about this shortly.....he should be looking at it now.

 

also your BHP / Torque sig is funny mate well done.



#11 Gombal

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:33 PM

Funny no-one has mentioned changing the flywheel at the same time as the clutch. Thought it was common practice these days. That's if the clutch does indeed need replacing !!!

If i'm correct the 1.4TDCI has a single mass flywheel (i know mine is), that's why i didn't mention it. Single mass flywheels last a lot longer as dual mass.

If it's indeed dual mass you could need a few bucks extra.



#12 alexp999

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 04:38 PM

Funny no-one has mentioned changing the flywheel at the same time as the clutch. Thought it was common practice these days. That's if the clutch does indeed need replacing !!!

 

I always thought it was the the other way round. If flywheel needs replacing, do the clutch while you are at it.



#13 Mike77

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 12:27 AM

They mate to each other,,,, if its got plenty of miles under its belt I would never change a clutch and not replace the dmf at the same time. Could just end up doing the same job twice.

#14 Bowsa

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 07:55 AM

My mate didnt get round to looking at it lol so right now, not sure whats going on. Hopefully will get too it today.......is there a final verdict on the fly wheel?



#15 Gombal

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 09:15 AM

If i would have a DMF (Dual Mass Flywheel) i would certainly change it together with the clutch. But i also have a 1.4TDCI like Bowsa and if i look in ETIS/ECAT it has a SMF (Single Mass Flywheel). Not saying Bowsa also has a SMF but the changes are big.

And a SMF is a lot sturdier and will probably outlive your car if you handle the clutch like it should be handled. (Off course, there are people who can destroy everything ;) )



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