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Tidying Britain's Terrible Roads

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#1 L666JER

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:09 PM

Just read Mike Rutherford's column on improving roads in Auto Express.

 

He says that out of work tradesmen could be employed by councils to help renovate Britain's deteriorating roads. E.g. builders/bricklayers fix potholes and kerbstones. Painters and decorators repaint faded road markings. Gardeners keep embankments and roundabouts mowed (then we might actually be able to see round them). This would speed up the process of revitalising Britain's terrible roads.

 

I personally think it's a great idea as it will save councils time and money, keep the unemployed employed and means we have nicer roads to drive on.

 

What do you think?



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#2 jamesm182

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

Just read Mike Rutherford's column on improving roads in Auto Express.

 

He says that out of work tradesmen could be employed by councils to help renovate Britain's deteriorating roads. E.g. builders/bricklayers fix potholes and kerbstones. Painters and decorators repaint faded road markings. Gardeners keep embankments and roundabouts mowed (then we might actually be able to see round them). This would speed up the process of revitalising Britain's terrible roads.

 

I personally think it's a great idea as it will save councils time and money, keep the unemployed employed and means we have nicer roads to drive on.

 

What do you think?

Good idea but won't the councils be too tight to pay for them?



#3 georgen

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:26 PM

Heard of the one using unemployed to keep the area tidy, ie litter picking and tidy up public places but this is going a bit far I think. knowing our government they will want to charge the persons doing it claiming it to be a training on the job tax or something.   



#4 L666JER

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:39 PM

Yeah, I can't see local authorities going for it either (whilst it is a good idea), but that is the problem councils aren't doing anything that has any effect.

Surely if it was done by local tradesmen, they would take more care in doing it.

Actually, 2 months ago they (the council) did a road near me which involved redoing a load of speed humps. The road is now worse than before (all rippled) and the speed humps are still unmarked to this day. I would have thought that they were required to mark out speed humps, the same way that they have to with speed cameras.



#5 jeebowhite

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 02:01 PM

If there was the opportunity of a job at the end of it, then it would be a good idea and you might have some uptake, however, how do you sell "will you work, fixing a pothole, on a live motorway, with nothing more than a cone to protect you from the traffic, and do it for nothing? we might give you a job at the end, but cant really say we will..."



#6 georgen

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 06:20 PM

If there was the opportunity of a job at the end of it, then it would be a good idea and you might have some uptake, however, how do you sell "will you work, fixing a pothole, on a live motorway, with nothing more than a cone to protect you from the traffic, and do it for nothing? we might give you a job at the end, but cant really say we will..."

You say if you don't we will take your benefits from you, but as said earlier would not work for these jobs as its rare experienced road guys and builder are out of work, 

But it would work for the thousands that want to sit on there backside and collect the dole long term as a lifestyle, I am not talking about the people who actually seek work or unable to, I am talking about the Lazy ones who think that they are owed it just because they breath. If you made them do a few days a week community work changing the days they do this and sign on, every week and failure would be to stop benefits, Drug test them as well as there is a lot of jobs out there where you get screened for this too. If they want my hard earned that the tax man robs from me every month should they not live by the same rules as me, up at 4:40  every morning Mon to Fri and 5:40 Sat and Sun, and no partying on a school night. 

 

Off my soapbox now, Next :D   



#7 jeebowhite

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 06:26 AM

Iagree, I think that voluntary work to earn benefits is a good thing, but some jobs are too much for your average joe to do.



#8 BigD

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 11:51 AM

Iagree, I think that voluntary work to earn benefits is a good thing, but some jobs are too much for your average joe to do.

I don't agree.  It's a horrible idea, and I'll tell you why.

 

First things first - if there is work to be done, then the person doing it should be put on the payroll, off benefits and paid PROPERLY.

 

Second, By filling up the employment market with people who are still classed as unemployed, and still in receipt of benefits, that makes it even harder for anybody to find a job.  Companies aren't going to pay people to work when the government is giving them free labour.  It happened in the early 1990s with Thatcher's YTS schemes, and it's happening again now.



#9 georgen

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:18 PM

I don't agree.  It's a horrible idea, and I'll tell you why.

 

First things first - if there is work to be done, then the person doing it should be put on the payroll, off benefits and paid PROPERLY.

 

Second, By filling up the employment market with people who are still classed as unemployed, and still in receipt of benefits, that makes it even harder for anybody to find a job.  Companies aren't going to pay people to work when the government is giving them free labour.  It happened in the early 1990s with Thatcher's YTS schemes, and it's happening again now.

I was thinking more like community work, like litter, graffiti, chewing gum, parks, riverbanks you know what the councils used to do but don't any-more or very poorly.  I also did YTS schemes and learned a lot but for pants pay, I used to get £25 a week and that was in the Mid 80s.



#10 jeebowhite

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 02:19 PM

+1 on George, I dont particularly think skilled jobs should be filled with just anyone, but things like community work (steretypical "community service" jobs if you will) to improve the neighbourhood's (for those who are capable of work - I am not suggestion that a disabled person should be made to climb ladders and paint a church spire!) should give something to get something. If you have genuine reasons (full time carer, parent etc) then it should not be compulsory, but if you live on benefits, and buy GTA5 for your latest console, and your at home 'cos you can' or whilst your on job seekers, I dont see the harm in being asked to contribute to society, just to add a little value, and make the neighbourhood a better place.

 

Plus, it can give skills, and its something for a CV - "I did voluntary community work, decorating, gardening, general property maintenance" can get you your foot into actual jobs on the market - rather than being asked in an interview "what do your DIY skills stop at" - "erm - looking at, let alone changing a plug fuse?"

 

I think, if you want to do a highway based job, and the council can save money by this 'voluntary working' scheme (voluntary defined as dont be lazy, your doing it for your money kind of thing!) then they can have more money to put out there and put into apprenticeships for those who want to do the better tasks.

 

Again, its just my opinion, I think if you CAN work, then you shouldn't be able to sit around playing consoles doing nothing in life and aspiring to get to the next level of your favorite game, rather than sitting in a job and doing an honest days work) then you really should contribute some time to the community (again, not even 37 hours, just a few hours a week would be enough to make a difference).

 

Granted, putting this into practice would be the hardest part, as to what constitutes as "capable" and "available" to do the work.



#11 BigD

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 07:46 PM

I was thinking more like community work, like litter, graffiti, chewing gum, parks, riverbanks you know what the councils used to do but don't any-more or very poorly.  I also did YTS schemes and learned a lot but for pants pay, I used to get £25 a week and that was in the Mid 80s.

I got £29.50 a week the first year, then £35/week the second year.  I was promised a job at the end of it (Which is the only reason I stayed at it).  Then two weeks from the end I got my marching orders.

 

So yeah, I learned a lot from it too.  No employer gives a toss about you.



#12 georgen

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 08:48 PM

I got £29.50 a week the first year, then £35/week the second year.  I was promised a job at the end of it (Which is the only reason I stayed at it).  Then two weeks from the end I got my marching orders.

 

So yeah, I learned a lot from it too.  No employer gives a toss about you.

Thats the way of the world, get no thanks for the good you do and the one time you stuff up you get dragged over the coals, you end up doing 5 peoples jobs for no more money too, but as i said to my old apprentice you have two choices, shut up and get on with it or walk. after three years he walked lol, and fair play to him he got a good job for good money. Plus he still talks to me all the time,  so as he said I was a c*** but I taught him something so thank you as he left PMSL.



#13 Stoney871

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:44 AM

I started working life on a YTS.
£27.30 a week for 6 months then £29.50 for the next 6.
£35 for another 3 months then the company I was working for topped it up to £70.
I gained two NVQ's then joined the RAF.
During my time in I did a degree in criminology (all paid for by the RAF) then after leaving on medical grounds did some work out of the country until I ended up where I am now.
Upshot is apprentice schemes can be a pain due to poor pay and low prospects but at least it kept me busy, gave me a trade and taught me good work ethics.
Too many people wanting something for nothing nowadays,
I always worked for what I wanted and in doing so appreciated the spoils of my labours more.

#14 mixmasterlooney

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 12:16 PM

I don't agree.  It's a horrible idea, and I'll tell you why.
 
First things first - if there is work to be done, then the person doing it should be put on the payroll, off benefits and paid PROPERLY.
 
Second, By filling up the employment market with people who are still classed as unemployed, and still in receipt of benefits, that makes it even harder for anybody to find a job.  Companies aren't going to pay people to work when the government is giving them free labour.  It happened in the early 1990s with Thatcher's YTS schemes, and it's happening again now.

 
I agree with this. It will not work, you cannot force someone to work for free in return of benefit, and if they refuse then them self are refused basic needs, that's slavery on top of their basic human rights to just a normal life. wont even work.
 

I started working life on a YTS.
£27.30 a week for 6 months then £29.50 for the next 6.
£35 for another 3 months then the company I was working for topped it up to £70.
I gained two NVQ's then joined the RAF.
During my time in I did a degree in criminology (all paid for by the RAF) then after leaving on medical grounds did some work out of the country until I ended up where I am now.
Upshot is apprentice schemes can be a pain due to poor pay and low prospects but at least it kept me busy, gave me a trade and taught me good work ethics.
Too many people wanting something for nothing nowadays,
I always worked for what I wanted and in doing so appreciated the spoils of my labours more.

 
I also agree with this but times have changed and especially with education and training, companies want people to pay, it's very hard to get companies these day to pay for training or education required to move on in todays world people now pay for their own training, cloths required and materials needed.
 
This is even more ironic because right now as things stand, if a young man or young woman parents are working yet struggling once over 18 they are not entitled to help, they have to pay for their own courses and training at colleges and training centre where people who are on benefit gets this for free or a reduced rate of £30 to cover admin fees.
 
The same can be said for uni with young people, if their parents work regardless being together or not they could be 1 penny under the threshold of what 36k combined income that young person isn't entitled to the financial aid to study on it all will require being paid back.
 
Whereas another family neither parents work or work but earn very little while is on income tax etc, finance is provided for free.
 
It's the british way to stuff the working man in the jacksie

Edited by jeebowhite, 12 October 2013 - 09:18 PM.
watch the choice of words


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