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Led Cabin Light Problems..


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#16 Mikey923

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:04 AM

The first pictures are when the doors are closed

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#17 rhys1606

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:46 AM

Yeah that is exactly what all of mine have done no matter what type of led bulb it is ......

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#18 jeebowhite

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 01:53 PM

It sounds like there is too much residual power running around the electrics which the LED is using to power from.



#19 Mikey923

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 02:14 PM

Anyway to stop this?

#20 gbmkb

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:13 AM

The problem of glowing LED bulbs is one I have encountered on cars with interior lamps with a delay circuit.

The delay system causes a small residual current to be present at the bulb even when the lamp is 'off'

Normally, the tungsten bulb has enough resistance to prevent the glowing when the circuit is 'off'.

However, LEDs have very little internal resistance and so glow slightly even when the delay timer is 'off'.

I have cured this in the past by soldering a small 'Grain of Wheat' bulb (as used by modellers and which is rated at less than 0.5 watt) across the LED bulb. (Make sure the bulb is 12 volt as they come in various voltages)

This is just enough resistance to control the residual current and stops the LED glowing.

It should be enough to do this to just one of the bulbs if you have a system with more than one interior lamp controlled by the delay unit.




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