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Boost Gauge.


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#16 FOCA

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:12 PM

I put mine in a cupholder (tried to upload a pic, did not work but its in my build thread) -

 

http://www.fordowner...2441-my-mondeo/



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#17 supercmaxer

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 10:44 PM

Just ordered what looks like the same gauge as yours., just one question if I'm tapping in to the hose from the intercooler to inlet manifold why would I need a T junction? Because only one of the ends are being used.

#18 FOCA

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 01:24 PM

Just ordered what looks like the same gauge as yours., just one question if I'm tapping in to the hose from the intercooler to inlet manifold why would I need a T junction? Because only one of the ends are being used.

On some cars there is a small-diameter hose that you can "T" into, its best to tap into the large diameter hose between the intercooler and inlet manifold, as there is a pressure drop across the intercooler, but you can tap into anywhere after the turbo compressor, before the manifold, but you may not get an accurate reading of what is actually reaching the manifold, as pressure changes with velocity (higher velocity = lower pressure - Bernoulli's law - the reason planes fly)  you might get different pressure readings depending where you tap it in - but the gauge may not be that accurate anyway  

 

You can get a "quick tap" that will tap into your existing pipes -

 

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item233aac032d

 

just stick it on to a suitable place and connect it to your boost gauge with a length of silicone hose



#19 supercmaxer

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 06:42 PM

On some cars there is a small-diameter hose that you can "T" into, its best to tap into the large diameter hose between the intercooler and inlet manifold, as there is a pressure drop across the intercooler, but you can tap into anywhere after the turbo compressor, before the manifold, but you may not get an accurate reading of what is actually reaching the manifold, as pressure changes with velocity (higher velocity = lower pressure - Bernoulli's law - the reason planes fly)  you might get different pressure readings depending where you tap it in - but the gauge may not be that accurate anyway  
 
You can get a "quick tap" that will tap into your existing pipes -
 
http://www.ebay.co.u...=item233aac032d
 
just stick it on to a suitable place and connect it to your boost gauge with a length of silicone hose



I've just seen the link. Don't quite get it lol. I'm guessing the would use the nut for the inside to keep it secure and then attach the hose in through the top?

#20 jeebowhite

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:04 AM

as far as I recall the nut goes on the outside of the hose and not the imside but yes this would help seal the gap.

 

One of the guys did a guide on this on the forum, so have a look around and you might see more of a pictorial on how to complete it.



#21 supercmaxer

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 09:14 PM

Yeah I've the tutorial. Sounds easy to plumb in. Just need to get part the tap in to the pipe.

#22 supercmaxer

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:05 PM

Boost gauge fitted to my c max today. Running at 20psi.

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#23 Stoney871

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:09 PM

Very nice job.

Sent from my S5

#24 supercmaxer

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 08:30 PM

Very nice job.
Sent from my S5


Thanks. Took the best part of 5 hours just to get the hose in through the firewall. What a pain.
Just one thing the needle fluctuates a bit, any ideas on how to stop this ?

Thanks.

#25 Lenny

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 02:17 PM

Thanks. Took the best part of 5 hours just to get the hose in through the firewall. What a pain.
Just one thing the needle fluctuates a bit, any ideas on how to stop this ?
Thanks.

cant stop the needle fluctuation mate,
This is the beauty of a variable vain turbo, part of the whole economical driving and increasing MPG came the variable vain turbo,
Its purpose is to assist the engine in achieving a speed then slowly die off as the engine reaches expected potential naturally,
The car try's to act like a naturally aspirated engine as much as possible to save fuel,

One advantage I've found with using the boost gauge:
It can help you drive more economically if you change gears as the boost begins to rise over 10-15
Psi
Because the higher the boost, the higher the fuel consumption.

#26 FOCA

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 05:28 PM

Thanks. Took the best part of 5 hours just to get the hose in through the firewall. What a pain.
Just one thing the needle fluctuates a bit, any ideas on how to stop this ?

Thanks.

If the needle fluctuates at a low froquency (slowly) it is probably the gauge showing you how much boost is getting to the (inlet) manifold

 

If it is fluctuating or "fluttering" at a high frequency (quickly) or the needle "jumping about" it cold be the pick - up point is too close to the turbine (so you are seeing the changes of the boost being controlled which does not represent the actual boost that arrives at the (inlet) manifold),  or too close to the inlet manifold (so you see individual cylinder pressures/ pressure "waves" - you could change the position of the pick-up-point to the outlet of the intercooler, or fit an in-line fuel filter (for a petrol car/ lawnmower/ with fittings that fit the gauge pipe ) in-line with your gauge, its the extra volume that will take the "flutter" out,(giving you more of an "avarage" reading) not the filter element 

 

fuel filter for boost gauge -

 

 

http://www.ebay.co.u...=item4ab6a6d45d  



#27 supercmaxer

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 05:39 PM

cant stop the needle fluctuation mate,
This is the beauty of a variable vain turbo, part of the whole economical driving and increasing MPG came the variable vain turbo,
Its purpose is to assist the engine in achieving a speed then slowly die off as the engine reaches expected potential naturally,
The car try's to act like a naturally aspirated engine as much as possible to save fuel,
One advantage I've found with using the boost gauge:
It can help you drive more economically if you change gears as the boost begins to rise over 10-15
Psi
Because the higher the boost, the higher the fuel consumption.


Managed to sort it. Found out the pipe was bent over causing it to fluctuate managed to fit a piece in to stop the fluctuating.

#28 supercmaxer

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 05:41 PM

If the needle fluctuates at a low froquency (slowly) it is probably the gauge showing you how much boost is getting to the (inlet) manifold
 
If it is fluctuating or "fluttering" at a high frequency (quickly) or the needle "jumping about" it cold be the pick - up point is too close to the turbine (so you are seeing the changes of the boost being controlled which does not represent the actual boost that arrives at the (inlet) manifold),  or too close to the inlet manifold (so you see individual cylinder pressures/ pressure "waves" - you could change the position of the pick-up-point to the outlet of the intercooler, or fit an in-line fuel filter (for a petrol car/ lawnmower/ with fittings that fit the gauge pipe ) in-line with your gauge, its the extra volume that will take the "flutter" out,(giving you more of an "avarage" reading) not the filter element 
 
fuel filter for boost gauge -
 
 
http://www.ebay.co.u...=item4ab6a6d45d  


Fixed the fluctuating it was a bent pipe. The engine cover was leaning on the pipe.
Just one thing now, as it's a diesel am I meant to get vacuum or not?

On a good note I am getting about 18psi. Good or bad I'm not sure lol.

#29 FOCA

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 06:21 PM

Fixed the fluctuating it was a bent pipe. The engine cover was leaning on the pipe.
Just one thing now, as it's a diesel am I meant to get vacuum or not?

On a good note I am getting about 18psi. Good or bad I'm not sure lol.

You might get vacuum at low revs before the turbo produces boost, the engine can act as a NA (naturrally asperated) engine before the boost "kicks in" or the boost threshhold is reached or when you ist open the throttle/ accelerate - it depends how the engine is set up, if its a VNT, etc etc -

 

if you modify your car, you can often see the effect of the mods- i get hardly any vacuum now, the boost if almost instant

 

whatever it shows may be perfectly normal/ nothing to worry about and may just be the engine/turbo doing its job correctly

 

in stock form i only get as low as about 15psi with the boost controllers off and i run 22-24psi - the reading may be different depending where you put the pick-up point, as the pressure varies along the length of the boost hoses, and you get a pressure drop across the intercooler

 

the gauge may not be 100% accurate anyway - 18psi is ok (seems a little low for a modern diesel, but ok) - see if you ca look up what it should be on your engine, and if you have an overboost facility and if so, see if you can get it kicking in.   



#30 supercmaxer

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 06:51 PM

You might get vacuum at low revs before the turbo produces boost, the engine can act as a NA (naturrally asperated) engine before the boost "kicks in" or the boost threshhold is reached or when you ist open the throttle/ accelerate - it depends how the engine is set up, if its a VNT, etc etc -
 
if you modify your car, you can often see the effect of the mods- i get hardly any vacuum now, the boost if almost instant
 
whatever it shows may be perfectly normal/ nothing to worry about and may just be the engine/turbo doing its job correctly
 
in stock form i only get as low as about 15psi with the boost controllers off and i run 22-24psi - the reading may be different depending where you put the pick-up point, as the pressure varies along the length of the boost hoses, and you get a pressure drop across the intercooler
 
the gauge may not be 100% accurate anyway - 18psi is ok (seems a little low for a modern diesel, but ok) - see if you ca look up what it should be on your engine, and if you have an overboost facility and if so, see if you can get it kicking in.   


I did think about the gauge not be accurate. Would the psi depend on the mileage as mine has done 170k?

Over boost lol. You have lost me now.

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