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hubballi

Economy

5 posts in this topic

Hello, I have just joined this forum.

I recently purchased a 1999 1.6 petrol Focus after running a very good Peugeot 106. The Focus is a fantastic car but not as good on fuel economy, especially short runs. Of course I don't expect a heavier car with a higher engine to match the 106 but I feel that when the engine is ticking over the idle sounds fast to my ears.

Has anyone else found the best way to get more miles out of their focus (brand of petrol, idle settings etc)

Thanks.

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Hello, I have just joined this forum.

I recently purchased a 1999 1.6 petrol Focus after running a very good Peugeot 106. The Focus is a fantastic car but not as good on fuel economy, especially short runs. Of course I don't expect a heavier car with a higher engine to match the 106 but I feel that when the engine is ticking over the idle sounds fast to my ears.

Has anyone else found the best way to get more miles out of their focus (brand of petrol, idle settings etc)

Thanks.

Hello, anybody home ??????

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Hello, anybody home ??????

Sell it and get a diesel. Mine's done 139,000 and I still get ~55MPG.

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Sell it and get a diesel. Mine's done 139,000 and I still get ~55MPG.

Not when I got the car for a mere £950. It defeats the object. I don't want a diesel, they are too noisy and when they have problems it can be expensive.

All I want to know is what I can do to help with running costs.

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Remove Unnecessary Weight From Your Car:

This doesn’t mean you have to rid your car of panels, seats and wheels; but simply take out unnecessary objects that add more weight to your car and make the engine burn more fuel. Do you really need to keep that canoe in the boot all week long when you only use it on Sunday morning? Or what about that roof box or bicycle rack that you haven’t used in a while? Although removing such items from your car may seem insignificant, it is very important. For every 50kg of weight you remove from your car, you can reduce the engines fuel consumption by an average of 2 percent. Out you go kids…

Maintain your speed:

Maintaining your speed on motorways is an excellent way to lower your car’s thirst for fuel. Driving at high speeds means more fuel is used to combat increased air resistance, but driving at very low speeds can be dangerous to fellow road users. If you drive at 120 km/h rather than keeping a steady 100 km/h, fuel consumption can increase by over 20%!

Pump Up Your Tyres:

A single tyre that is under-inflated by two pounds of pressure can increase your car’s fuel consumption by 1 percent. There are four tyres on your car, so you do the maths. An under-inflated tyre not only adds an unnecessary strain on your engine, but will also increase thread wear on your tyres. Check the recommended PSI for your car in your owner’s manual, drive down to your local garage and get pumping!

Listen to Traffic Reports:

Pay close attention to traffic reports on the radio before you leave your home or office, as you may be able to choose a less congested route. Radio stations such as 2FM, 98FM and RTE often provide nationwide traffic reports alongside their hourly news bulletins. In Dublin city, 1.03.2FM offers exclusive rush hour *traffic reports and has proved very useful to the CBG team.

Turn Your Engine Off When Stationary;

Do not let your car’s engine idle needlessly. If an engine is left idling (ticking over) for more than 10 seconds, it actually wastes more fuel than restarting the engine. Idling can consume up to four litres of fuel per hour, which is the equivalent of €5 worth of petrol. If you do have to stop and start, minimise the amount of time you sit with the engine in idle. If you know you are going to be sitting at a traffic light for a minute or two, turn off your engine and save fuel in the process.

Clean Your Car’s Air Filter:

The air filter is an extremely important part of your car that prevents dirt from entering the engine. It also happens to be an extremely easy component to maintain, even for those who are non-mechanically minded. Over time it can become clogged with dirt and will need to be replaced. Driving your car around with a dirty filter can reduce your car’s fuel economy by over 10 percent, which is the equivalent of adding around 4 cents to each litre of fuel you buy. A new air filter only costs around €30 to purchase.

Go Easy On The Accelerator:

Constantly pressing your brakes and accelerating towards stop signs and traffic lights needlessly wastes fuel. By pressing the brakes on and off you are wasting the fuel it took to get up to speed, and then you’ll need to burn more fuel to get back up to speed after slowing down! By accelerating up to stoplights and stop signs, again, you’re using energy that you know you really don’t need. Give yourself enough room behind the cars in front of you to see what the conditions are like ahead. This will help you avoid tapping the brakes and constantly using the accelerator and constantly using the accelerator.

Adhere to Service Intervals:

Be sure to follow your vehicle’s recommended service intervals and fluid requirements – it's a simple step that could save you time and money. A car which has had its engine oil changed will run more efficiently than a poorly maintained car, which will save you petrol.

Consider Independent Specialists:

Sourcing car parts and getting your car serviced with independent specialists such as www.team.ie and kwickfit can save you heaps of cash in the long run. Be fully aware of the services they provide and the prices they charge to ensure you are getting a good deal. Always benchmark these against the outlets you would typically get your car serviced and repaired with before spending. Don’t be afraid to ask for a better price, the worst they can say is no.

Get Fit:

If your destination is near enough to walk or cycle to, leave your car at home. Not only will you save money on petrol and lower your carbon footprint, but you’ll also get some exercise too!

Should help

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