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Is a coil pack replacement a DIY job?


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#1 mixup

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 03:11 PM

Following on from post below it might be that I need to replace coil packs on my 1.8 Zetec.

Is this a job anyone can carry out or does it have to be done at a garage?

Is there a set of instructions anywhere covering this?

Can anyone explain where I start!

Thanks

IMG00073_20091206_1525.jpg

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#2 stef123

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 06:40 PM

its a very simple job that should set you back half an hour.

if you look at your oil filler cap, just under that you have four round bits with wires connecting each of them, these are your coils. simply unclip the connector and remove the bolt securing the coil. it is good practice to replace the spark plugs also.

looking at the pic, it looks like you will need an 8mm socket for the coils.

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#3 mixup

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 07:38 PM

its a very simple job that should set you back half an hour.

if you look at your oil filler cap, just under that you have four round bits with wires connecting each of them, these are your coils. simply unclip the connector and remove the bolt securing the coil. it is good practice to replace the spark plugs also.

looking at the pic, it looks like you will need an 8mm socket for the coils.


Cheers Stef

Right so to get this correct I assume I first must disconnect the battery?

And if replacing the plugs I need to replace the leads in the correct order, although looking at it their length determines that anyway I think.

Does make of plugs matter? Does make of coil pack matter, get from Ford or ebay?

Finally the plugs need to be adjusted for the car, I have done this but it was years ago.

Thanks

#4 stef123

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 08:42 PM

Cheers Stef

Right so to get this correct I assume I first must disconnect the battery?

And if replacing the plugs I need to replace the leads in the correct order, although looking at it their length determines that anyway I think.

Does make of plugs matter? Does make of coil pack matter, get from Ford or ebay?

Finally the plugs need to be adjusted for the car, I have done this but it was years ago.

Thanks


to be fair I have never disconnected the battery of any car to change ignition coils and i reckon that most people dont either. so i would just leave it connected.

it does look like the length of cable determines where each plug goes but to keep things tidy i would do one at a time.

I personally would recommend you go for standard ford plugs but if NGK or Bosch have a fitment they will also be fine. Generally they do come with the gap already set but it is good practice to double check the gap using feeler gauges. I would stick with genuine ford coils but i expect these will be pricey, ebay may have genuine ones though so its worth a look.

if you have any other questions then fire away (no pun intended...)

from ebay these are the best i can find...
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item1c093cae26

I use motaquip stuff quite alot and have never had any problems.

#5 artscot79

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 09:10 PM

to be fair I have never disconnected the battery of any car to change ignition coils and i reckon that most people dont either. so i would just leave it connected.

it does look like the length of cable determines where each plug goes but to keep things tidy i would do one at a time.

I personally would recommend you go for standard ford plugs but if NGK or Bosch have a fitment they will also be fine. Generally they do come with the gap already set but it is good practice to double check the gap using feeler gauges. I would stick with genuine ford coils but i expect these will be pricey, ebay may have genuine ones though so its worth a look.

if you have any other questions then fire away (no pun intended...)

from ebay these are the best i can find...
http://cgi.ebay.co.u...=item1c093cae26

I use motaquip stuff quite alot and have never had any problems.

i agree ive never diconnected the battery either

#6 mixup

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 09:58 PM

Thanks all.

As I think I need four coil packs is there any reason why I shouldn't say do two at a time to see whether this fixes my misfire issue?

I assume you can move these around without causing too many problems.

#7 stef123

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 10:03 PM

Thanks all.

As I think I need four coil packs is there any reason why I shouldn't say do two at a time to see whether this fixes my misfire issue?

I assume you can move these around without causing too many problems.


you can change as many or as little at a time as you want, it wont cause any problems. the reason all 4 are usually changed together is becuase when one goes the rest are never far behind.

#8 mixup

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 10:17 PM

you can change as many or as little at a time as you want, it wont cause any problems. the reason all 4 are usually changed together is becuase when one goes the rest are never far behind.



Right understood, do they simply detach and pull out, or does the spark plug needs to come out first?

#9 stef123

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 10:33 PM

Right understood, do they simply detach and pull out, or does the spark plug needs to come out first?


unclip the electrical connector, it will probably have a bit you squeeze. then undo the 8mm? headed bolt and simply pull the coil straight up, dont be afraid to pull it quite hard as it will be seated on top of the spark plug. once the coil is out the road it will reveal the spark plug :)
remove the spark plug using the appropriate size spark plug socket (which i think i mentioned in your other post). when fitting the new plug smear a little copper grease on the threads to aid removing them in the future, this will stop them seizing in place and potentially becoming expensive. make sure you screw the new plug in all the way by hand to ensure you have not cross threaded it and then nip it up with your ratchet or whatever you are using.
then repeat :) if your not a car person then it may sound daunting at first but it is a very simple and straight forward task and should make more sense when your actually doing the job :)

#10 mixup

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:06 PM

unclip the electrical connector, it will probably have a bit you squeeze. then undo the 8mm? headed bolt and simply pull the coil straight up, dont be afraid to pull it quite hard as it will be seated on top of the spark plug. once the coil is out the road it will reveal the spark plug :)
remove the spark plug using the appropriate size spark plug socket (which i think i mentioned in your other post). when fitting the new plug smear a little copper grease on the threads to aid removing them in the future, this will stop them seizing in place and potentially becoming expensive. make sure you screw the new plug in all the way by hand to ensure you have not cross threaded it and then nip it up with your ratchet or whatever you are using.
then repeat :) if your not a car person then it may sound daunting at first but it is a very simple and straight forward task and should make more sense when your actually doing the job :)


Cheers Stef

Its been a few years! But I am a little stuck as the garage want 100+ labour to even start this job, and the car has 'warranty' cover.

I want to find the issue myself and then I can be satified that I am not being ripped off.

I will post back when done next weekend I hope!

Hopefully the misfire will have gone, and then its onto fitting the microswitch on the boot...... :angry:

#11 stef123

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Posted 06 December 2009 - 11:25 PM

Cheers Stef

Its been a few years! But I am a little stuck as the garage want 100+ labour to even start this job, and the car has 'warranty' cover.

I want to find the issue myself and then I can be satified that I am not being ripped off.

I will post back when done next weekend I hope!

Hopefully the misfire will have gone, and then its onto fitting the microswitch on the boot...... :angry:


once you have done the job and realised how easy it is you would certainly grudge paying atleast 100 in labour.

hope all goes well for you :)

#12 mixup

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 04:09 PM

once you have done the job and realised how easy it is you would certainly grudge paying atleast 100 in labour.

hope all goes well for you :)


Quick update.

Got myself the correct tools, just waiting for the packs to arrive.

However in making sure I could do the job and then running the car (after removing a couple of the packs (and the putting back)) in I notice that there is slight smell of exhuast in and around the engine, moreover the exchaust does sound a little throaty when revved.

Two questions, how do I tell whether the exhaust has 'gone', and would a hole in the exhaust cause a slight misfire?

Cheers

#13 stef123

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 05:35 PM

Quick update.

Got myself the correct tools, just waiting for the packs to arrive.

However in making sure I could do the job and then running the car (after removing a couple of the packs (and the putting back)) in I notice that there is slight smell of exhuast in and around the engine, moreover the exchaust does sound a little throaty when revved.

Two questions, how do I tell whether the exhaust has 'gone', and would a hole in the exhaust cause a slight misfire?

Cheers


usually when the car has a misfire the engine bay always seems to smell of petrol, ive noticed this on a few cars. with the engine running if you feel round any joints or gaskets on the exhaust you shouldnt be able to feel it blowing, if it does then that may be part of your problem. a hole in the exhaust wouldnt necessarily cause a misfire but it could cause poor running.

#14 artscot79

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Posted 12 December 2009 - 08:12 PM

usually when the car has a misfire the engine bay always seems to smell of petrol, ive noticed this on a few cars. with the engine running if you feel round any joints or gaskets on the exhaust you shouldnt be able to feel it blowing, if it does then that may be part of your problem. a hole in the exhaust wouldnt necessarily cause a misfire but it could cause poor running.


with the engine running put the palm of youre hand over the exhaust pipe and hold it there if the exhaust is fine the build up of pressure will be strong enough to push youre hand away if the exhaust is badly leaking youll feel very little pressure and it wont push youre hand away and youll likely hear it whistling out of the hole/holes

#15 mixup

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 07:04 PM

Just a quick update. Finally got around to this and it was a single coil pack at fault. Easy fix and well worth 35 for the part.

Cheers Stef123.

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