• Huge Range of Ford Parts
      Huge Range of Ford Parts
    • Get Your Club gear
      Get Your Club gear
    • Savings Up to 15% Off For Members
      Savings Up to 15% Off For Members
    • 1000's Of Fords For Sale
      1000's Of Fords For Sale
    • Share Your Car Experience
      Share Your Car Experience
    • Join Premium & Save
      Join Premium & Save


Tanisla2

LED build change over.

Recommended Posts

Hi I have replaced the DRL lights and they work fine.....I wish I could find a bulb to replace the outside lights...any ideas ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Do the 100W LED's get significantly hotter than the standard halogens? I want to do the change, but am a little hesitant thinking that if the light housing cant take hotter bulbs, then its gonna cost big time at some point!


It's not just the housing itself, more importantly it's the wiring. The wiring is not designed for that kind of draw. A 100W will draw around 8amps (rounded up) and a 55w bulb will only draw 4amps (rounded down). The risk of an electrical fire is higher.

I think with the right kind of heat Sync then the actual temperature of the light may not be so much of an issue.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Jonro2009 said:

 


It's not just the housing itself, more importantly it's the wiring. The wiring is not designed for that kind of draw. A 100W will draw around 8amps (rounded up) and a 55w bulb will only draw 4amps (rounded down). The risk of an electrical fire is higher.

I think with the right kind of heat Sync then the actual temperature of the light may not be so much of an issue.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

Ah, but the question is, is it really a 100 Watt bulb or, as is often the case with LEDs, a 100 Watt equivalent bulb.

Looking at this table:

598197d29ea5f_LEDvsIncandecents.jpg.5b35b018e645cec90a796fc7d7e31ada.jpg

You can see it is probably only actually consuming 20 Watts which, if true, is only drawing 2 amps (rounded up).

Willing to be corrected on this if you can actually show a spec for the subject bulbs but I have tried and can't find one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ah, but the question is, is it really a 100 Watt bulb or, as is often the case with LEDs, a 100 Watt equivalent bulb.
Looking at this table:
598197d29ea5f_LEDvsIncandecents.jpg.5b35b018e645cec90a796fc7d7e31ada.jpg
You can see it is probably only actually consuming 20 Watts which, if true, is only drawing 2 amps (rounded up).
Willing to be corrected on this if you can actually show a spec for the subject bulbs but I have tried and can't find one.


You are absolutely right, I didn't take into account that it was LED so would consume considerably less. Serves me right for being a smart 4rse lol. I did a bit of reading and found the following table b6e7ecb320db5ad8f9e585e7059cc8c4.png

As you said a 100w 'equivalent' LED bulb is actually on or around an 18-20w bulb, drawing between 1.5 and 1.6amps while providing around 1000-2000lumens of light. The misleading bit is them being advertised as 100w bulbs when they are not, they are equivalent to 100w standard bulbs.

I found this description for a set of lights for sale. It shows the lumen output to be 1900, I'm unsure if that is per bulb or combined but it confirms the draw to be around 1.5a ad4a2f09966e8282e99cf75de56320ac.png


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So guys in layman terms is my edge going to burn lol 


Lol, sorry. It would seem that the wires should cope easily with the upgrade and because LEDs don't heat up at the source of the light, then the lenses should be fine too. The rear of the units obviously get very hot, and the heat sink should dissipate that heat but I can't say wether or not it will do it efficiently enough not to melt the rear of the cluster. Unfortunately that doesn't answer your question.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bulbs depicted in the 3rd post by Tanisla2 have no heat sink and as I now have received some I can confirm that.  I haven't fitted them yet.

I might test them with an external 12 volt supply to see just how hot they get before I fit them but I see no reason why LEDs should get hot as they do not produce light as a bi-product of heating a wire as in the case of incandescent bulbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jim610 said:

The bulbs depicted in the 3rd post by Tanisla2 have no heat sink and as I now have received some I can confirm that.  I haven't fitted them yet.

I might test them with an external 12 volt supply to see just how hot they get before I fit them but I see no reason why LEDs should get hot as they do not produce light as a bi-product of heating a wire as in the case of incandescent bulbs.

LED's used in vehicle lighting applications (i.e. Headlamps, 55W work-lights on agg/construction machines) produce an enormous amount of heat. It may not be a traditional filament, but the silicon junction still conducts and dissipates a huge amount of energy (Watts) in the conversion of electricity to light. That's why LED's used in lamps, spots, etc are usually bonded directly to an aluminium plate in an attempt to get that heat away from the LED itself.

I suspect the LED's without heatsinks on the back will get pretty hot, especially when they are sat in an enclosed space with no airflow past them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not entertain an LED bulb without a heat sink, I think it's asking for trouble. Where does all that heat go without somewhere/something to draw it away? I'd wager that they would certainly melt some of the housing and also more worryingly, any wires that may be touching it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/3/2017 at 11:39 AM, simonb65 said:

LED's used in vehicle lighting applications (i.e. Headlamps, 55W work-lights on agg/construction machines) produce an enormous amount of heat.

Simon̊

Interesting statement however, my experiment, as I mentioned I was going to do, does not back up your statement.  Let me explain.

Using the bulbs in Tanisla2's picture I connected them to a 12 V battery.  Initially I connected the low wattage connection (DLR) and ran it for 30 mins and using a laser digital thermometer I regularly monitored the temperature.  I then repeated the same experiment with the high wattage connection (Main Beam) and also ran that for 30 mins.  The maximum temp I found anywhere on the bulb was the metal collar that locks it into the housing and that was 71̊C.  At all times I was able to handle the bulb with bare hands.  The battery used was a 12V 1.2 AH lead acid and in 60 mins it dropped voltage from 12.5 to 11.6V so I recon the bulb was pulling around the 1.2A.

I then recharged the battery and repeated the exercise with the original Halogens out of the car, max temp 121̊C and the battery was pretty depleted after just 30 mins on Main beam.

So, in summary, those LEDs Tanisla2 has found do not pull as much current and get nowhere near as hot as the Halogens that came with the car.

I have fitted them to the car and will go for a run tonight when it gets dark to see if there is much difference.  I will report back.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to it getting dark now lol. That's a good experiment and the results are exactly as I would expect (after being corrected earlier on the actual power the bulb was drawing). I didn't expect the bulb to get hot and would have expected the heat to be further back, at the rear of the whole unit. Was the max temp of 121 found at the collar or the actual bulb?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, found out why Tanisla2 is so quiet in this subject now!  

I've been out in the dark and I can say with 110% conviction that these bulbs are an utter piece of crap!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The dipped beam was throwing the light further forward than these.  I could see a small increase in whiter light being thrown out to the sides when main beam was on but absolutely none illuminating the road beyond the limit of the dipped lights.

DON'T BOTHER WITH THEM.

Originals will be going back in in the morning.

Might have to settle for trying Osram Cool Blue Intense 64176CBI H15 Halogen-Headlight bulb but at £26 a pop they are a bit steep for a 20% increase in brightness:angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the review. Saved a few of us a couple of quid and a lot of hassle. I have heard this to be the case with many aftermarket LEDs which is a massive contrast to the adaptive LEDs that are factory fitted dependant on spec.

£26, is that for a pair or a single unit? I would be tempted at £26 for the pair just to get rid of the yellow DRL


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Osram Cool blue intense headlight bulbs. I think you will be surprised at the improvement even though it's only supposed to be a small increase on paper. I am certainly very pleased with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jezza

Is the quoted price for each bulb or a pair?  It's not obvious online.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 04/08/2017 at 7:38 PM, Jim610 said:

Interesting statement however, my experiment, as I mentioned I was going to do, does not back up your statement.

HI jim, It was based on my experience as a princial electrical/electronics engineer at a major construction company. The LED worklights used had to be mounted on external brackets and the lamps rear shell was a die cast housing with more heat sink fins than a 50cc motorbike engine! After 20 minutes of use, you couldnt touch the back of them. They drew about 4.2A @ 13.6V (Rated at a true 55W). What you have looks like its only about 18W. They probably sell them as equivalent illuminosity as a 55W/100W filament lamp!

Nice you've spot temped the mounting, as that's the bit I would be concerned with, especialy in contact with the ABS/PBT headlight housing.

Your last post summed it up for me though! If they don't perform, the rest is just pointless chaff. If you do find an good alternative though, a similar analysis would be great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/08/2017 at 7:36 AM, Jim610 said:

Jezza

Is the quoted price for each bulb or a pair?  It's not obvious online.

Jim

Powerbulbs.com

£18.99 for a pair of H7 Osram Cool Blue Intense bulbs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Powerbulbs.com
£18.99 for a pair of H7 Osram Cool Blue Intense bulbs


It's the H15 12/55W bulb that Jim has been testing. Was it the H15 you wanted a price on @Jim610


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the continuing battle to get improved night lighting I have now fitted Osram Cool blue intense headlight bulbs.  Mmmmmmmh!

There is definately a brighter whiter light coming from the main beam however, they still don't throw light any further than the originals.  I can only assume the lense/reflector shape is not designed fo sending light as far as I would like.

Are they worth the price of £25/bulb, not convinced however they will staynin for now.  Would I buy them again, probably not

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad I ordered the led headlights option now after reading how poor the halogens are. 

I just need to understand the autobeam thingy!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The auto high beam is magic- God knows how it works but it does- I think it's my favourite feature. Mind you- even if you left high beam nobody would notice! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now