Ford Owners Club - Ford Forums Messages

Club Announcements

Ford Fair 2016: Tickets and stand passes are now available to purchase. More info here.

Review your Ford: Help others when it comes to buying a car like yours and review your Ford now

Ford Car Parts: View All ford car parts by category. Look for Ford Car Parts now!

AdBlock Warning

Parts of this website do not function properly with AdBlock enabled on your device. To get the best user experience on our website, please disable Adblock for this website (domain) on your browser.


Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Guide To Complete Stereo Installation Focus Mk2


Hi, last year I did a complete stereo installation in my 2005 Focus MK2. I am from Norway, so please excuse the bad english :) And the metric system :)

I was very dissapointed with the sound quality in the car. The Head-Unit, Ford CD6000 suffer from a combination of poor dynamic resolution and lack of power - resulting in very bad sound quality. Even replacing it with the cheapest aftermarket cd-players will give you a great improvement in sound quality.

IMG_7347web.jpg

I started with a plan on only change the head unit, but somehow it really took off. It ended with a complete stereo installation, including reinforcing the electrical system and sound dampening. At the same time I wanted to make the installation not showing - except for the head unit.
I wanted to have good bass, 2x12" woofers in the back, but I use the space there on occasion, so the box had to be easily removed.

The choice of components where made of good buys at the time - and Infinity is an old favourite of mine.

Start of with some pictures of the finished installation:

IMG_8522web.jpg

IMG_8518.jpg

IMG_8487web.jpg

IMG_8491web.jpg

IMG_8489web.jpg

IMG_8504web.jpg

IMG_8508web.jpg

Schematics showing stereo components and electrical reinforcements:

(3-veis
aktiv deling: Means 3-way Active Network, it means that crossover for
each speaker are built in the cd-player and can be adjustet on the unit.
It also require that you have one dedicated amplifier channel to each
speaker, except for the woofers in this case - as they preferable are
driven in mono. The benefit are that you can adjust many more sound
parameters. The unit also includes auto set up (with included
microphone) for soundlevels, speaker distances, equlizer and crossover
parameters - if you don't want to do it manually)

IMG_7484-copyweb.jpg

IMG_7658fix.jpg

Original sizes shown in parentheses.

First: tweeters and woofers in the front doors:

IMG_7999web-2.jpg

I started with checking the size of the stock tweeters, the panels they are built in to, are easy to take off:

IMG_7963web.jpg

Just a little photoshop trick to show 3 versions of one panel :)

IMG_7966web.jpg

IMG_7965web.jpg

With these measurements, (and for the woofer) I startet looking for a
2-way component speaker system. Not to many systems describes the size
of their tweeters in specs on the internet. But I was happy to find the
Infinity Kappa Perfect 6.1 system - meeting the requirements - both in
size and good reviews.

IMG_8069web.jpg

IMG_8068web.jpg

Using rubber tape to make perfect fit (I used some hot glue too)

IMG_8071web.jpg

Like a gloove :)

IMG_8072web.jpg

Next, the woofers

To remove the inner door trim panel, there are 2 bolts hidden behind the lower part of the grab handle, the rest are retaining clips and disconnecting of electrical connectors. Using Haynes Workshop Manual will be helpful.

IMG_8002web.jpg

No screws - strange way of fitting speakers...

IMG_8005web.jpg

I measured the height of the adapters:

IMG_8006web.jpg

I used pliers to help remove the speakers:

IMG_8016web.jpg

Backside of the stock speakers:

IMG_8031web.jpg

I found speaker adapters on Ebay that fitted well:

IMG_8018web.jpg

Now it was possible to measure max depth for the woofer, I lowerer the window to "worst case scenario" :

IMG_8021web.jpg

There was still some air between the inner trim panel and the speaker, using only the adapter - I had to build the adapter higher to get a perfect fit:

IMG_8039web.jpg

IMG_8067web.jpg

At this point I had not decided on which head unit to buy. I decided to place the included crossovers somewhere in the dash. With that in mind, I decided not to use the original speaker wiring, And increasing the size of the wiring will benefit sound quality.

IMG_8075web.jpg

IMG_8076web.jpg

IMG_8077web.jpg

Getting the wiring to the dash was difficult, I ended up using the rubber-hose and going through some holes that was not in use.

IMG_8079web.jpg

The wiring connected to the crossovers in the dash. Later when I chose to go for 3-way active network and amplifiers - these where not used.

IMG_8081web.jpg

Finished door:

IMG_8082web.jpg

For a while, I used these speakers with an old Pioneer 4x50W cd-player - and the sound was truly fantastic, compared to the old system. I really loved how easy it was to work on the Focus. And I began thinking of using amplifiers and maybe getting a subwoofer.

IMG_7383web.jpg

Fascia and wiring loom was bought on Ebay - uk sellers.

As mentioned, I was really happy with the new stereo installation. But thoughts on how it would sound with a couple of amplifiers and a good subwoofer kept me thinking. I have not installed such a stereo system in a car before, and almost all installations I have seen, have left the luggage compartment close to unusable. And I did'nt want this.
After a lot of thinking and searching on the net, I came up with a solution that would give me both high sound quality and a luggage compartment to use.

All those car-stereo places I visited, mentioned the big improvement in sound quality - with sound dampening.
My Focus had a really big problem with road noise, even with summer tires, it's a big problem. And in the winter season I use these tires:

IMG_7592.jpg


Better sound quality and lowered road noise - yes I wanted that!

So taking apart the interior next, starting with the most important, the front doors:

IMG_8029web.jpg

Draining channels in the bottom of the doors were close to not function, because of this slimy goo, it smelled too. All the doors had the same problem. No wonder car doors rust at the bottom. Properly cleaned:

IMG_8048web.jpg

The sound damping mats I used, I bought from a local shop, they are heavy. About 3kg/sq.m. In total I used 16 sq.m - a total of almost 50kg. Very easy to work with, just remember to clean surface properly.

IMG_8170web.jpg

Put on multple layers behind the speaker:

IMG_8173web.jpg

The inner panel:

IMG_8176web.jpg

Taking the doors apart are easy, but using the Haynes manual is recommended. I lubricated all the moving parts I coud reach. The locking mechanism and power windows working as smooth as ever. And the feeling and sound of closing the doors!!! No more "boiiing" bucket sound when closing doors - more like an old luxury car with a elegant low click. And you can barely hear the central locking operate - I now have to look at the blinking lights to ensure the car locks when using the remote.

Back doors getting the same treatment:

IMG_8187web.jpg

Just by doing this, the road noise were significant lowered. The sound quality improved too - especially to a tighter, harder bass - just how we like it :)

Back to the sound dampening, as expected there was very little sound dampening installed. The roof:

IMG_8192web.jpg

IMG_8194web.jpg

The luggage compartment, the wheel housing without any sound dampening - no wonder my car is noisy :)

IMG_8202web_zpscea5e448.jpg

IMG_8198web-1_zpseb5dcd86.jpg

Sorted - with multiple layers especially on the wheel housings:

IMG_8208web-1_zpse6f82315.jpg

I used the opportunity to improve the lighting here too - white LEDs on both sides:

IMG_8422web.jpg


JSFocus and MiltyG565 like this


0 Comments

There are no comments to display.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now