• Announcements

    • Stoney871

      Posting in General Chat thread.   11/11/2017

      it has been noted that too many Members are posting messages in the General Chat area instead of the correct Forums. Any messages posted in the General Chat area that are not General Chat will be deleted without warning and offenders may recieve warning points if repeated instances are seen from that Member. There are plenty of different Club areas that encompass 99% of Ford related posts, please select and use the correct one. If anyone is not sure of which area to post something then feel free to P/M myself or other Senior Staff for guidance. The Moderating Staff are having to spend far too much time chasing this problem instead of maintaining the other areas of the forum.


Mondeo V6 fuel pump and sender replacement


Description

Mondeo V6 fuel pump and sender replacement

Fuel pump and sender replacement

My fuel gauge in my Mk3 V6 has never registered below 1/4 tank, so I've always been playing petrol roulette once it gets down to around the 1/4 mark, and have carried a can of fuel in the boot just in case...had to use it twice.

Finally got around to buying a new pump & sender unit from eBay: http://www.ebay.co.u...19.m1438.l2649

I removed the electrical connector from the old pump, attached it to the new one, and made sure it worked before going any further...it did, went from showing empty on the gauge (with 3 miles remaining) and fuel light on, to full (with 412 miles remaining).

Because I'm a bit lazy and couldn't be bothered taking the tank off to do the job, I decided to enlarge the hole in the floor, so I also bought these from eBay: http://www.ebay.co.u...872.m2749.l2649

I marked out the approximate size with a paint pen, and set to work with my new snips, which worked fantastically as it's only thin sheet metal. Took less than 5 mins, and put some bodge tape around the edge of the hole to avoid getting cut to shreds.

Next step was to disconnect the electrical connector and fuel pipes. Be careful with these as the appear quite brittle: there are three tabs to release, I used a pair of long-nose pliers and a small flat-blade screwdriver to gently press the tabs in and wiggle the connector out. Don't lose or damage the little seals.

Now I had to release the screw-top collar holding it all in. I used a copper drift and a rubber mallet to tap it around until it came off.

 

Attached Image: 20170908_172144_resized.jpg

 

Then carefully withdraw the top section, then the pump section (rotate it slightly anti-clockwise to release it from the base of the tank), noting the correct orientation.

 

Attached Image: 20170908_172500_resized.jpg

 

Fit the new pump, giving it a slight turn clockwise to attach it to the tangs in the tank base.

Fit the screw-top collar, tapping it back nice and tight. Reconnect the pipes, taking care not to damage the little seals. They can be quite stiff to go in, a bit of lube helps (good old vaseline! :lol: )

 

Attached Image: 20170908_181128_resized.jpg

 

Reconnect the electrical connector, then, with a bit of rag handy, turn on the ignition to prime the pump...if you've got any leaks, it'll be evident now. If not, fire up the engine and make sure all is well.

I have since found a piece of sheet metal to cover the hole just for neatness and to protect the electrical and fuel connectors.

No more petrol roulette! Happy days!


 Report this tutorial


0 Comments

There are no comments to display.