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mjt

Member Since 24 Apr 2008
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 09:19 AM
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#398583 Ford Focus Mk2 Steering Wheel Vibration

Posted by mjt on 17 August 2014 - 02:53 PM

Assuming you've checked for distorted wheels I'd have thought the next place to look would be the driveshafts and their joints. As the vibration is noticeable from such a low speed I'd check for the shafts running out of true and have a close look at the inner tripod joints.




#372826 Steering Vibration

Posted by mjt on 09 June 2014 - 09:40 AM

Hi Folks,

 

For some time now our 03-plate Mk1.5 Ghia estate 1.8TDCi has suffered from a bit of steering vibration. It recently had an MOT and came away with a clean bill of health but needed new front tyres. The front wheels have been re-balanced three times since then but the vibration is still there. It happens from about 65 indicated upwards and is not constant, sometimes it's worse, sometimes barely noticeable. I have noticed that on a gradual bend in the road it comes and goes as though the wheels are going in and out of sync.

 

At the last balance I specifically asked the the guy to check that the alloys were undamaged and running true and he confirmed they were ok. Also as far as I know the driveshafts are undamaged.

 

I'm now wondering if the problem is the suspension getting a bit tired and slack - the car's done just over 105K - and therefore less tolerant of any slight imbalance in the wheels and shafts. I just bought a 60-plate Mk2.5 hatch and the handling of that feels so much tighter and more responsive and although I realise the steering geometry is probably different the older car feels distinctly soggy by comparison.

 

In spite of the clean MOT I wonder if I should have the front shocks replaced. If so what brand should I go for? I notice Euro Car parts list three different makes.

 

I should be grateful for any help or suggestions.




#368028 Dpf Ford Focus

Posted by mjt on 26 May 2014 - 09:55 AM

+1 mate,
Also on a side note: i spoke to an environmental chemist in work and asked him whats his view on DPF,
He reckons the self regeneration process is actually worse than having no dpf because it drops a bomb of toxic gasses potentially in a built up area instead of cosistant low levels,
He also says turning carbon in to gasses it worse for the ozone,

This is precisely why I decided not to buy another diesel. Don't get me wrong, I love the driving characteristics, torque and economy of our 1.8TDCi but I think diesel emissions are far more injurious to human health than a petrol engine and the measures taken to try to overcome them are both ineffective and expensive. For a long time now I've had the suspicion that the increase in breathing problems such as asthma is at least partly linked to the use of diesel engines, in the haulage industry and public transport as well as increasingly in private cars.




#347553 Speedo

Posted by mjt on 26 March 2014 - 03:31 PM

On that topic what irritates me are people who dawdle along at 45 on a clear straight road then enter a 30 limit and continue at 45. I just have to wonder what's going on in their brains.




#347412 Osram Cool Blue Intense

Posted by mjt on 25 March 2014 - 10:40 PM

The blue filter layer on these lamps is intended to make the output look whiter by absorbing wavelengths in the yellow region which is where the light output peaks so they must actually give less light than bog standard ones of the same wattage. The energy absorbed will also make the envelope hotter. The only way to get a whiter light without these absorption losses is to run the filament at a much higher temperature which will inevitably shorten its life.




#318053 Do Badly Timed Injectors Sound Like Noisey Tappets On A Petrol Engine?

Posted by mjt on 05 January 2014 - 12:57 PM

Personally I would avoid using engine flush. When an engine is drained not all the oil is recovered. Some remains in oil galleries etc.This is why in the service manual there are different quantities quoted for filling a dry engine compared with refilling after an oil change. This is part of the reason new oil turns black so quickly and means that some of the flush will be left behind and dwindling traces will remain for several oil changes thereafter.




#292127 Low Mpg

Posted by mjt on 24 September 2013 - 09:24 AM

I think martyntdci has put his finger on it. Diesels are most fuel efficient on really long trips. We took our 1.8Tdci up to Scotland earlier this year and the mpg went up to 65. At home it varies between 47-52 and never goes above 52 even on a 50-mile trip on mainly low-speed local roads. Just a trip down to the local supermarket instantly knocks it back.




#290777 Focus Mk2 Rear Drum Removal

Posted by mjt on 17 September 2013 - 09:04 AM

You're right Clive, Haynes have gone downhill big-time in recent years, dumbing down their manuals so much that I find they're really only useful for technical specs and torque settings these days.




#289667 More Power 1.8 Tdci

Posted by mjt on 12 September 2013 - 08:55 AM

Additionally I hope you've declared all these performance modifications to your insurance company otherwise you'll effectively be driving uninsured.




#284877 Left Indicator Flashing Too Fast Mk1 Focus

Posted by mjt on 25 August 2013 - 10:10 AM

whenever a bulb has blown the resistance on the circuit decreases and the voltage increases causing the bulbs to flash faster and brighter.

 

If you were to add more bulbs to the same circuit the resistance would increase and voltage decrease causing all bulbs to flash slower with less lumens.

Actually it's t'other way round - since the bulbs are wired in parallel when one blows the resistance in the circuit increases and the current decreases. Adding more in parallel would decrease the resistance and increase the current.

 

In the days when I first started driving the flasher units were simple bi-metallic units so the flashing speed was directly related to the current passing through the unit. A higher current would make the bi-metallic strip deflect further and take longer to return thus slowing the rate. A lower current would deflect it less and it would return more quickly. That's where the idea of rapid flashing when a bulb blew originally came from. Modern units are electronic so I'm guessing this has been deliberately designed-in.




#283755 V-Power Nitro+ And Unexpected Side Effect

Posted by mjt on 20 August 2013 - 09:21 AM

From what I've read elsewhere it seems fairly likely that supermarket diesel lacks the additives that are put into branded fuel. I don't use it unless it's an emergency "splash and dash". It's interesting that the garage that does my service offered me the Forte treatment but when I said I only used branded fuel they replied that I didn't need the treatment.

 

Don't be fooled by the 'it all comes from the same tank' either. The additives are apparently added to the tanker which has separate compartments for the different retailers.




#268040 Mpg Figures...

Posted by mjt on 15 June 2013 - 03:16 PM

Arthur's absolutely right. We have a run to our daughter's house of almost identical mileage and mix of roads. The best we achieve is 52-55mpg so your result looks about right. If I pop out to fill up the mpg shows a hit a few miles after we set out for home then normally recovers by the end of the journey. Journeys to the local shops & supermarket soon knock it back to 45 mpg or less. You'll also notice that the calculation lags by a few miles. You may find it goes up a bit on a short journey that follows a long one before it starts to drop back and initially drops at the beginning of the next long one..

 

Unless your air filter is seriously clogged I can't see it having a noticeable effect on your consumption.




#267764 Mpg Figures...

Posted by mjt on 14 June 2013 - 12:41 PM

I know its not scientific or the best way to do it, but last week I put £35 worth in, when the trip said it had about 75 miles left to empty. A week later, when it said 75 miles left, I'd done about 242 miles. The £35 petrol (@ £1.359/litre) was 5.66 gallons.... 242 miles divided by 5.66g = 42.7mpg. The trip is saying an average of 41.5mpg, so it cant be that far adrift, can it?

Bear in mind that the range figure is calculated from the average mpg figure so it's no surprise that they are in step. The only accurate way is tank brim to tank brim. The trip is useful for seeing how it goes up and down in different scenarios and driving styles.




#267083 Mpg Figures...

Posted by mjt on 11 June 2013 - 03:01 PM

41 does seem a bit on the low side although a 13-mile trip is a bit marginal for a diesel I'd say. Diesel lumps do take a while longer to get to working temperature due to more metal and lower combustion temperatures. Your dad's sounds about right but you don't say what kind of motoring he was doing.

 

You should notice a significant improvement during your up-coming journey. I find that short-shifting helps a bit - change up before the revs go over about 2K as the turbo starts to kick in about there. It's not necessary to rev it as it pulls like a train from low revs and mine will pick up cleanly from 1K as long as it's not going uphill.




#258783 Should I Worry About This Rust?

Posted by mjt on 09 May 2013 - 11:24 AM

It needs both to be done adequately for proper protection. Paint won't protect well on it's own because there's always the problem of uneven coverage, especially on edges and corners, and pinholes and galvanising will corrode in the presence of road salt if unprotected by paint. Cavities also need to be well wax-injected to protect from condensation.

 

I suspect we've passed the high point of manufacturers applying good protection to bodyshells, around the turn of the century, and they're now starting to compete to shave the costs of providing it.