Sign in to follow this  
Dave May

Automatic gearbox jammed in PARK, easy to permanently fix free

Recommended Posts

This automatic gearbox belongs to my 2004 Mondeo TDCI Estate but most other automatic cars could have same fault, unable to move shift out of park and have very similar parts.

The shift lever will only be able to move when an electrical solenoid valve has 12 volts on it to unlock the lever. This solenoid is fitted in the lower part of the lever consul. The 12 volts comes from the brake lights, so first thing to do is

CHECK THE BRAKE LIGHTS COME ON WHEN YOU PRESS THE BRAKE PEDAL.

 If brake lights work, start taking the lever consul apart and repair the solenoid valve which is just dirty electrical contacts.

Follow the numbered photo's below, it's very easy to get apart.

Photo 1 : Remove both side panels of the centre consul, the drivers side and the passenger side. There is only one short 10mm long screw holding them on . When screw is out pull the panel towards you from the top, there are 5 clips at the top holding them on.

Photo 2 : Start at the left hand rear of the fascia panel. lever it upwards with small sharp screwdriver, it will easily come up all along the bottom side.

Photo 3 : Further up on left had side, start to lever this part outwards.

Photo 4,  : Remove top of the shift lever, it's a 3mm Allen key

Photo 6, 7, 8 Carry on CAREFULLY pulling out the top part of the fascia, then it will lift up. DO NOT bend the bottom side up too high as it will snap in half. I pulled the rubber surround out first but this rubber must be fitted same way round, the cutout on the underside of this rubber faces towards the back.

Photo 9 : There are 10 screws to remove, to get the black surround off. The red blobs are where the screws are, the two large red blobs are at the lower point and screws might be difficult to see, they are 30mm long screws. Two screws are on the drivers side and two on passenger side, move seats back to get at the screws. These screws are about 12mm long.

Photo 10 : Pull out the drink holder.

Photo 11 : I unclipped the chrome surround but it's not necessary to remove this. Just lift up the middle part but be 

careful as there is a plug to move, marked on photo. Also pull out all of the rubberised polystyrene insulation.

Photo 12 : This shows the socket part of the plug with wires attached has also to be removed from holder, not just the top part of the plug. This was a bit difficult for me as I did not realise the socket part was attached to the surround.

Photo 13 : Look at the part you just removed. Note the white slider, this is the manual way to operate the solenoid valve. The chrome lever surround has an 8mm dia cap, near the P, to remove so a screwdriver or thin pen can be pressed downwards on the white slider to operate the solenoid. Have you found the solenoid yet. At this point you should understand how the shift lever unlocks to move to drive.

Photo 14 : This is the solenoid valve to remove. There are only 2 screws to unscrew, the back screw is under the metal frame and was difficult to remove. Only a watchmakers screwdriver will remove this screw, look closely at the back screw in this photo, you should just see the thin screwdriver on the screw head. This photo is out of order, note new screws fitted.

Photo 15 : The cut down watchmakers screwdriver fitted in a socket set. Maybe you could just bend a thin screwdriver 90 degrees to remove this screw.

Photo 16,17 : The solenoid valve is in 2 halves riveted together. You must now carefully drill out the 2 rivets and look inside.

Photo 18 : This shows THE FAULTY CONTACTS that stop the solenoid working. Switch on the ignition and press the brake pedal. Touch the contact with your finger, you should hear and see the solenoid work ( it's only 12v you will not get an electric shock ).

Photo 19, 20 : Switch off ignition and pull off the 3 wires so you can remove complete solenoid and clean contacts with emery paper and drill out rivet holes and fit 2 new screws to hold the two parts together.

Photo 21, 22 : Note new screws have nuts visible at the top. If nuts protrude at the underside the solenoid valve will not lay flat. Make sure wires are fitted in correct order, see photo. Now switch on ignition again, press the brake and make sure the solenoid valve operates. 

Photo 23 : The White plastic part next to the shift lever drops downwards when lever is in park and pushes the solenoid so that the buzzer stops and you can remove the ignition key.

Photo 24 : This just shows the chrome surround with manual hole open so you can see how to manually operate the solenoid valve to  move the shift lever to get you home.

Reassemble in reverse order and hopefully have job satisfaction that you have saved lots of money. 

Good Luck and Best Wishes

Dave

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

   FORD POWERSHIFT AUTOMATIC GEARBOX COULD GIVE TROUBLE.

NOTE:   I have always recommended Ford Automatic cars because of the reliability of my 2004 MONDEO Estate. It has now done 190,000 miles with just engine oil changes at every 12,500 miles. The automatic gearbox has never had an oil change and never given any trouble and I tow a 1.5 ton boat. This type of automatic gearbox has a Fluid Coupling ( Torque Converter ) which is excellent for a tow car as there is no clutch to wear out.

Newer Mondeo's or any Ford will have a POWERSHIFT automatic gearbox which is NOT a genuine Torque Converter gearbox. It is a MANUAL GEARBOX with TWO CLUTCHES which have plenty of expensive problems. Type on google Powershft problems you will see many reports. It has to have very expensive gearbox oil changes every 35,000 miles and if you tow a caravan or boat the DUAL CLUTCH will not last long as there is no TORQUE CONVERTER.

I will be keeping my very old reliable MONDEO until it eventually stops working and hopefully by then Ford will have ditched Powershift and gone back to a normal torque converter gearbox. I will not be buying until torque converter is back.

Thought you all should know this.

Regards

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this