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Direct driven supercharger?


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Is there any weight in a direct  drive supercharger. A supercharger is usually driven by a belt that is connected to the crankshaft pulley, but would there be any sort of benefit from directly connecting the SC to the crankshaft itself and not being belt driven at all. I got the idea from Vinyl turntables which perform better in direct driven format rather than models driven by a belt.

Am I on to something here or is it a fruitless endeavour to even try such a thing, I just thought that the performance may be boosted by being directly turned without the aide of belts.

 

 

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1 hour ago, TomsFocus said:

How would you mount it?  There's no space next to the crank pulley.

You can change the pulley sizes to increase boost though.

 

Ok so I should probably have said theoretically speaking. If there was space to do something like that, would it be better?

Not all superchargers are huge, cut a hole in your bonnet, no room to fit it, monsters. The amr 300 measures in at  only 10.5cm X 17.5cm, so theoretically could fit into most spaces.

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You'd have to cut a lump out of the chassis next to the wheel arch to direct drive it though! :tongue: 

Alternative would be to mount it under the sump and drive it with a single gear instead of a flexible belt...but you'd still get losses through that gear.

Or you could power it electronically instead, using a single direct drive electric motor...no charger lag at low revs that way and it could be mounted anywhere at all.  Would be heavier though.

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3 hours ago, TomsFocus said:

You'd have to cut a lump out of the chassis next to the wheel arch to direct drive it though! :tongue: 

Alternative would be to mount it under the sump and drive it with a single gear instead of a flexible belt...but you'd still get losses through that gear.

Or you could power it electronically instead, using a single direct drive electric motor...no charger lag at low revs that way and it could be mounted anywhere at all.  Would be heavier though.

You know i saw a guy make an electronic supercharger using a real turbocharger and put a 36v marine motor on it, which is pretty much what is done with the proper e-superchargers that cost mega money.

3 hours ago, Turvey said:

 

that’s massive😆

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I wander what sort of electric motor could be used to drive a small supercharger or turbocharger housing?

I have been looking around ebay but it is unclear what type of motor spec would be suitable to drive a positive displacement, 500cc, 16500rpm max turbine. It would be a fun project to undertake I think.😃

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I'm sure superchargers run faster than the crankshaft, that's one of the reasons why it's belt driven.  As mentioned above space is normally the problem. I've seen centrifugal type ones, but they are normally geared up to run faster.

Roots type have been tried before, quite successfully too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bentley_4½_Litre#/media/File:Bentley_4½_Litre_Blower.jpg

Some manufactures are now producing electric turbos, these have big motors and 48V to power them and are certainly not the computer type fans you see on fleBay.

 

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yar Aristech do an E-supercharger but they are mega money, same as the other electric ones. I think Garrett have recently developed an E-turbo too which looks neat.

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Audi has them, I'm sure Merc do, have a feeling there is one on the new Defender.  No idea about after-market ones. I'm sure they all run 48V, not standard 12 from battery.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/opinion/technology/under-skin-why-electric-superchargers-are-gaining-ground

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3 minutes ago, Jim H said:

Audi has them, I'm sure Merc do, have a feeling there is one on the new Defender.  No idea about after-market ones. I'm sure they all run 48V, not standard 12 from battery.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/opinion/technology/under-skin-why-electric-superchargers-are-gaining-ground

Yeah it is usually 48V as this is the sweet spot to get the high electric revolutions needed to power the turbine and get the highest boost.

 

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I am wandering if some thing like this could be used to drive a supercharger instead of having it hooked up to a pulley? I am really unsure at what sort of specification would be needed to turn the impeller to produce extra boost. One guy on youtube was using a motor from RC plane to produce boost through a turbo unit.

 

72V 3000W BLDC Motor Kit With brushless Controller For Electric Scooter E bike | eBay

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