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2012 Focus Mk3 lacking low-end power


kxs156
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Hi all, 

I recently bought a great looking second-hand 2012 Focus Mk3 estate wagon. The previous owner offered to pay for the costly 10yr service (including all belts) as part of sale, but at his friends shop. The shop had a good reputation but as the work progressed it was clear they had not worked a lot on the EcoBoost engines. When they finally finished the work I got “check engine” lights and they “cleaned some sensors” and now the light is gone. So all is good… but not quite.

 

The car feels weak compared to the first weeks I drove it (before the work was done). The garage says there are no errors etc. And when we test drove it together they say this is how the car is. I don't think they really have any ideas and just want to move on. My previous car was a 2006 Focus 1.6 100hk, and this one has the 125 EcoBoost. It should be peppier, no? But it feels the same now. What really impressed me driving the EcoBoost initially was how much low-end power it had, almost like a diesel. But now the “boost” doesn’t kick in before 4-5000rpms depending on gears. Before the service it could climb the very steep hill up to my house in second gear easily, now I have to stay in first to avoid stalling.

 

Any ideas what is happening here? I just purchased a Forscan interface, and starting to look at the data. But where to look? Is the car maybe in some confused low-power state? Are the any module resets that are worth trying?

 

Kaspar

 

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It's a pity you did not read the fault codes before they had a chance to do whatever they did to clear them. 

Generally if something is wrong then a fault code would be logged, and one may still pop up when you have driven the car more.

My gut feeling is that the Crankshaft and/or Camshaft timing have not been set correctly after the rebuild although I would expect either smoke or other symptoms as well.

As to what to check I would start with the Fuel Trims, They should normally stay below + or - 10 and if they get to +/- 25 (I think) then a fault would be logged. Also check the Boost Pressure, it should be Atmospheric Pressure, approx 100Kpa under a steady throttle but go up when you put your foot down. There should be a Desired and Actual PID for that and a lot of other things in FORScan.

The other thing to check is Mode 6. The figures might be double  dutch, but is one of then is near its limit then that might give you a clue. There are also Key On Engine Off and Key On Engine Running self tests in FORScan as well, it might be best to try this first. 

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Changing the belts on an Ecoboost engine with out all the special Ford tools is almost sure to end with problems. Most non-Ford garages will run a mile if you ask them to change the wet belts.

The problem you might have now is one of timing, but it could also be a hundred other things. Who says that they didn't damage the engine while trying to do the timing belt replacement. I fear you have bought a pup !!

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12 hours ago, Tizer said:

It's a pity you did not read the fault codes before they had a chance to do whatever they did to clear them. 

Generally if something is wrong then a fault code would be logged, and one may still pop up when you have driven the car more.

My gut feeling is that the Crankshaft and/or Camshaft timing have not been set correctly after the rebuild although I would expect either smoke or other symptoms as well.

As to what to check I would start with the Fuel Trims, They should normally stay below + or - 10 and if they get to +/- 25 (I think) then a fault would be logged. Also check the Boost Pressure, it should be Atmospheric Pressure, approx 100Kpa under a steady throttle but go up when you put your foot down. There should be a Desired and Actual PID for that and a lot of other things in FORScan.

The other thing to check is Mode 6. The figures might be double  dutch, but is one of then is near its limit then that might give you a clue. There are also Key On Engine Off and Key On Engine Running self tests in FORScan as well, it might be best to try this first. 

 

Thanks for your suggestions 🙂 I think you are on to something: with Forscan I am getting Code 16&17 on the PCM (Crankshaft position correlation - Alignment/adjustment incorrect). The codes are Present at time of Request.

Would you recommend running the service procedure Camshaft Position Reference Adaption Learn?  (Could the garage have neglected to do this?) 

 

In regards to your other comments the figures looked ok except the 02S12.STFT fuel trim which just remained stuck at 99.22% (did not move)

 

 

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In this case it is highly recommended to check the crankshaft/camshafts timing first. This however is a 3 to 4 hour job.

Checking the crankshaft/camshafts timing requires the rocker cover to be removed. Removing the rocker cover requires the ignition coils, induction hardpipe, induction hoses, high pressure fuel pump, fuel line, injector fuel rail, injector wiring harness, vacuum lines, crankcase ventilation hoses, etc. to be removed.

Once the rocker cover is removed the plug that covers the timing hole inside the crankcase must be removed and the crankshaft timing pin (303-1604) must be installed. Now rotate the crankshaft clockwise until it is blocked by the crankshaft timing pin. Now check the following things:


1: Crankshaft pulley.

The timing hole inside the crankshaft pully should be in line with the timing hole of the engine block. This can easily be checked by inserting the crankshaft timing pin (303-732). If the holes are not in line the crankshaft pulley is not installed correctly.


2: Camshaft timing.

Both crankshafts have a machined square that is used to set the timing. Remove the TI-VCT actuators and installI the TI-VCT pulley locking tools (303-1606) The locking tool prevents the pulleys from moving. Next install the camshaft alignment tools (303-1605) onto the cylinder head. The alignment tools should easily fit onto the machined square without any force. If the alignment tools do not fit at all or force is required to fit the alignment tools the camshaft timing is not correct.

 

If the timing is not correct it can be corrected by removing and reinstalling the crankshaft pulley. This however requires quite some special tools like for example the torque multiplier (303-1611), torque multiplier adapters (303-1611-1 and 303-1611-2) and the crankshaft locking tool (303-1602).

Changing the wetbelts on a 1.0 ECOboost is not rocket science but without all special tools it is very dificult to perform this job correctly. Since the special tools that are required to perform this job are quite expensive (especially the torque multiplier) there are very few independent garages that have these special tools. Many that try to perform this job without the special tools fail !

It is also important to know whether they changed only the main wetbelt or also the oil pump wetbelt. Changing the oil pump wetbelt is a considerable amount of work because the sump also needs to be removed but not changing the oil pump wetbelt while changing the main wetbelt is extremey stupid. Since the oil pump wetbelt is installed behind the main wetbelt on the crankshaft the oil pump wetbelt can only be replaced if the main wetbelt is removed.


If in any doubt it is highly recommended to have the wetbelts changed again by a Ford dealer or specialist who generally are experienced in performing this job.


 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, kxs156 said:

Would you recommend running the service procedure Camshaft Position Reference Adaption Learn?  (Could the garage have neglected to do this?) 

Wilco's comprehensive answer says it all, this needs to be done first.

As to the Adaptation Learn, the truth is I don't know for sure but doubt that will fix the problem if there is a fundamental problem with how things have been lined up. I have not seen the factory workshop manual for that engine but have seen one for a similar engine and there is no mention of resetting the adaptations, plus FORScan is a near dealer level tool, the one that the garage has may not be able to do that.

The rear O2 sensor STFT may be a spurious reading and may even be something that is not supported for that engine. There are often PID's in FORScan that are not supported for all engines in the range so they normally give a default reading that does not mean anything or move. If there was something wrong with either the fuelling, Catalytic Convertor or O2 Sensors then there would be one of many codes logged or something out of specification in Mode 6.  

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