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Water In Plug Ports Issue, With Pictures

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I think the copy below of the email I have sent to the Ford Main Dealer I purchased the car from ...advertised as a "Franchise Approved Vehicle" twelve moth ago this coming Saturday, explains the issue.

Now I'm awaiting a reply from same, so dependent how accommodating they in agreeing to resolving the issue on my terms. I want the fix done, I also want the spark plug ports cleaned [and the ignition leads]And inspected by be me prior to the spark plugs being removed and replaced by new ones. If they agree to that, I will keep their name out of this report.

The lesson to learn here is, you obviously cannot trust a Main Dealer to do what should be done in regards to the known fault on Ford vehicles. So in this instance naming names is NOT what this thread is about............but if they don't cooperate.................

Lucky for me, my mechanic appears to have taken out the least flooded plug.

Good Morning,

regards earlier phone conversation with a sales person.

Car bought 16/10/09, major service carried out by your service department prior to pick up. There was a technical service bulletin in force prior to my purchase in regard to a known fault with water ingress into the spark plug ports. And as such the fix [revised washer jets] should have be done prior to me taking the vehicle.

On having the car serviced last week by my mechanic. It is self evident from the enclosed photos that the fix was not done by **** Ford and the spark plugs are sat in a sludge of rust contaminated water. So I told him not to remove and inspect plugs two three and four until I researched the issue further.

There is documented evidence on the web of plugs being blown out of the engine. Plugs again due to rusting shearing off at service time, resulting in expensive repair costs. And as a result of these findings I feel it is Fords and more to the point **** responsibility to resolve the issue not my mechanic.

Please ring me back on **** ******.

I'm not looking for arguments or hostages, I'm looking for a resolution to the problem.

Thank You,

Port 4

Plug4port.jpg

Port 3

Plug3port.jpg

Port 2

Plug2port.jpg

Port 1

Plug1port.jpg

Plug stems 2 3 4

Plug234stems.jpg

Edited: to insert the word NOTthat was missing in the third paragraph.

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I think the copy below of the email I have sent to the Ford Main Dealer I purchased the car from ...advertised as a "Franchise Approved Vehicle" twelve moth ago this coming Saturday, explains the issue.

Now I'm awaiting a reply from same, so dependent how accommodating they in agreeing to resolving the issue on my terms. I want the fix done, I also want the spark plug ports cleaned [and the ignition leads]And inspected by be me prior to the spark plugs being removed and replaced by new ones. If they agree to that, I will keep their name out of this report.

The lesson to learn here is, you obviously cannot trust a Main Dealer to do what should be done in regards to the known fault on Ford vehicles. So in this instance naming names is what this thread is about............but if they don't cooperate.................

Lucky for me, my mechanic appears to have taken out the least flooded plug.

Good Morning,

regards earlier phone conversation with a sales person.

Car bought 16/10/09, major service carried out by your service department prior to pick up. There was a technical service bulletin in force prior to my purchase in regard to a known fault with water ingress into the spark plug ports. And as such the fix [revised washer jets] should have be done prior to me taking the vehicle.

On having the car serviced last week by my mechanic. It is self evident from the enclosed photos that the fix was not done by **** Ford and the spark plugs are sat in a sludge of rust contaminated water. So I told him not to remove and inspect plugs two three and four until I researched the issue further.

There is documented evidence on the web of plugs being blown out of the engine. Plugs again due to rusting shearing off at service time, resulting in expensive repair costs. And as a result of these findings I feel it is Fords and more to the point **** responsibility to resolve the issue not my mechanic.

Please ring me back on **** ******.

I'm not looking for arguments or hostages, I'm looking for a resolution to the problem.

Thank You,

Port 4

Plug4port.jpg

Port 3

Plug3port.jpg

Port 2

Plug2port.jpg

Port 1

Plug1port.jpg

Plug stems 2 3 4

Plug234stems.jpg

the revised washer jets in fact do not fix the issue they do still leak in heavy rain though admittedly only a few drips having the 1.8 the issue is somewhat different as the engine sits further forward so the spark plugs get missed completely but it does drip onto the alternator main wire my advice is tell them you want them fitted with a small amount of clear silicone on the underside to stop any water at all

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Well they had not got back to me after half an hour, so I rang them back. Got to speak to a service advisor, now he has obviously not seen the email and photo's in question. But he denies there was a service bulletin out regards the revised washer jets, and suggests it was a core plug issue. I said, look I can point you to the web were posters have been told by ford service desks it is the case. Anyway I'm not here to argue with you, it is still in warranty that I got with the car. He said the warranty wont cover core plugs.....now can anybody see where this conversations going........guy on service desk looking for a way to make the customer pay for any remedial work needed.

Look I've been in business and I've seen it from both ends of the argument. Big failing with a lot of business, they are prepared to jeopardise brand loyalty in an attempt to save a dollar. Rather than take the customer complaint on board at face value until other wise proved to the contrary

Anyway I thrive on taking on these kind of firms, I just take my issue up the company food chain so to speak. I'm not in the habit of fighting consumer issue battles where I'm likely to lose, in fact I never have lost a battle in that regard. As I have neither the time or inclination to waste their time or mine. In any case I don't think we are at that point in time yet regards escalating it up the food chain. So I just said, look the issue as to where the water is coming from can be easily resolve with an antifreeze tester.

I said as far as I see it, until proved otherwise it is their problem not mine. And as such I want the water jet fix doing, I also want to be present at the extraction of the water and testing of same. And I want to inspect said ports are clean before the spark plugs are removed replaced with new ones. He agreed to this, and the car is booked in for 8.30am tomorrow morning.

Anyway unbeknown to the service advisor, I did a test this morning prior to taking the leads of the spark plugs, and photographing same. I placed a sheet of white cardboard over the spark plug ports, and played water on the bonnet and windscreen area for a couple of minutes. I then leathered off any residual water on the bonnet before I lifted it up. And there was a water blob stain with a run off tail stain going off the end off the sheet of cardboard, directly below the off side water jet and above number two plug port. There was also a water droplet directly below the nearside washer jet, on the component cover just to the right of the coil pack, and to the left of the battery cover. So to me it looks very much like a rain water issue.

My mechanic at the time of service pointed out that the coil pack had obviously been changed at some time. Because the HT leads had been marked with dots of paint at the coil pack end. Would not be surprised if underwater HT leads had contributed to a failing coil pack.

Anyway an interesting thread Ford Focus II (2004 - 2007) - 2004 1.6 Zetec Spark Plug blown out of engine over on the Honest John website were the core plug / washer jet argument is discussed in full. Plus there are plenty more threads on the web pointing to the washer jets being the accepted culprit in the vast majority of cases. As a guy called "bazza" said on that HJ thread, best thing to do is make a cover out of a rubber floor mat to stop any water getting into the ports and coil pack. Since he did that the plug ports have been "snuff dry" I'll probably do the same after it has been sorted by the garage.

Oh and by the way since I got the car and post the selling dealers service, I have had only ever washed the car with a non pressure hose pipe. So pressure washing is not the culprit, it lives outside and sits there in all weathers come rain or shine.

edit: cheers artscot, I will ask them to do that, it was suggested also by a poster on the linked thread.

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Well they had not got back to me after half an hour, so I rang them back. Got to speak to a service advisor, now he has obviously not seen the email and photo's in question. But he denies there was a service bulletin out regards the revised washer jets, and suggests it was a core plug issue. I said, look I can point you to the web were posters have been told by ford service desks it is the case. Anyway I'm not here to argue with you, it is still in warranty that I got with the car. He said the warranty wont cover core plugs.....now can anybody see where this conversations going........guy on service desk looking for a way to make the customer pay for any remedial work needed.

Look I've been in business and I've seen it from both ends of the argument. Big failing with a lot of business, they are prepared to jeopardise brand loyalty in an attempt to save a dollar. Rather than take the customer complaint on board at face value until other wise proved to the contrary

Anyway I thrive on taking on these kind of firms, I just take my issue up the company food chain so to speak. I'm not in the habit of fighting consumer issue battles where I'm likely to lose, in fact I never have lost a battle in that regard. As I have neither the time or inclination to waste their time or mine. In any case I don't think we are at that point in time yet regards escalating it up the food chain. So I just said, look the issue as to where the water is coming from can be easily resolve with an antifreeze tester.

I said as far as I see it, until proved otherwise it is their problem not mine. And as such I want the water jet fix doing, I also want to be present at the extraction of the water and testing of same. And I want to inspect said ports are clean before the spark plugs are removed replaced with new ones. He agreed to this, and the car is booked in for 8.30am tomorrow morning.

Anyway unbeknown to the service advisor, I did a test this morning prior to taking the leads of the spark plugs, and photographing same. I placed a sheet of white cardboard over the spark plug ports, and played water on the bonnet and windscreen area for a couple of minutes. I then leathered off any residual water on the bonnet before I lifted it up. And there was a water blob stain with a run off tail stain going off the end off the sheet of cardboard, directly below the off side water jet and above number two plug port. There was also a water droplet directly below the nearside washer jet, on the component cover just to the right of the coil pack, and to the left of the battery cover. So to me it looks very much like a rain water issue.

My mechanic at the time of service pointed out that the coil pack had obviously been changed at some time. Because the HT leads had been marked with dots of paint at the coil pack end. Would not be surprised if underwater HT leads had contributed to a failing coil pack.

Anyway an interesting thread Ford Focus II (2004 - 2007) - 2004 1.6 Zetec Spark Plug blown out of engine over on the Honest John website were the core plug / washer jet argument is discussed in full. Plus there are plenty more threads on the web pointing to the washer jets being the accepted culprit in the vast majority of cases. As a guy called "bazza" said on that HJ thread, best thing to do is make a cover out of a rubber floor mat to stop any water getting into the ports and coil pack. Since he did that the plug ports have been "snuff dry" I'll probably do the same after it has been sorted by the garage.

Oh and by the way since I got the car and post the selling dealers service, I have had only ever washed the car with a non pressure hose pipe. So pressure washing is not the culprit, it lives outside and sits there in all weathers come rain or shine.

edit: cheers artscot, I will ask them to do that, it was suggested also by a poster on the linked thread.

i wouldnt use the rubber mat idea tro be honest as long as the jets are sealed there wont be anymore issues its easy once its all done and dry a 1 litre bottle of water half a litre on the top of each jet if it doesnt leak from that it wont leak at all it is an issue and like you ive seen many many posts even the parts guys will tell you it was an issue thats why the jets were revised they just have a slightly bigger lip no foam or seal like some mention even with them in place pop the bonnet open and put some sealant around the edge jobs done thats why i dont have the soundproof cover on the inside of my bonnet the water leaks and builds up inside the cover then starts leaking and it can leak for days even when the weathers dry

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Right I had a change of plan:

I decided to suck the water out and take it to my mechanics garage and have it tested, still 99% sure it was rain water, as it's clear and I have not lost any coolant water. Well look what I got out of the two sections that the plugs orifices sit in, in pairs. And think on my mechanic had already taken one plug out to inspect it.

ExtractedWater.jpg

Then on getting it out I rang my mechanics garage no answer so I thought he must be doing MOT work at the other garage nearby. Rang later and still no reply and as it's a round trip of 15 miles I thought sod it I can see when it settles its rain water. And as nobody will do a better job than me of cleaning the water and accumulated crap out, I decided to do just that. As I had read on the HJ thread, you could get the two revised washer jets to do the job [they have a rubber gasket that sits between washer jet and bonnet] for circa £2 pound a piece. I thought not worth doing a round trip of one an half hours, then waiting for them to do the job at the garage where I bought it, which is 25 miles away. It would have cost me more in petrol, so rang up an cancelled them doing the job.

So this is what I did:

Sucked water out via a long children's curly plastic drinking straw.

Got the wife's hair-dryer and dried it all out.

Got a small wire brush in via the HT ports and a large rubber blank grommet in the centre of the cover, did the sides.

Raked a screwdriver about where the two core plugs are and where the Spark plugs meet the block, to break up the crap. A bit of fine metal filings came out with a magnetized screwdriver.

Cobbled together a sucking hose by attaching a 15in piece of garden hose to the house vacuum cleaner with electrical insulating tape.

Well it came up spotless, sprayed WD40 liberally down the HT openings, let it work its way in for an hour. Then again dried and vacuumed it a out again

Cleaned up the HT leads popped them back on the car and nipped a mile up the road to my local Ford Dealer. Now because my washer jets are heated it would have cost £24 + for the replacement jets. And as artscot and others had said they still leak a bit, so you need to silicone sealant them under the bonnet as well. I thought sod it, I'll nip to the local DIY and get some sealant....£2.31

checked on getting back home that all was nice and dry in the spark plug well.

Masked off the around the washer jets, removed them from their bonnet position, applied sealant, re fixed them on the bonnet. Removed decorators masking tape from the bonnet. Cleaned away any residue, secured in position on bonnet with a cross of masking tape per jet. Reconnected washer pipes, and applied sealant to the underside of the bonnet. Job done [i'll leave masking tape on till later to night]

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Do the 1.8 mk1 washer jets leak water then? Might whip them off and blob some silicone on the underside before winter arrives.

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Do the 1.8 mk1 washer jets leak water then? Might whip them off and blob some silicone on the underside before winter arrives.

they do leak as in very heavy rain about 4 drips thats it but the small drip runs down and misses the engine 1.6 engine is round the other way so the plugs are directly underneath the washer jets unlike the 1.8 as you can see nowhere near them any drips will run past the engine drop right down the back past the alternator so no need to worry on the 1.8 the revised jets as i have them do not have a rubber seal on them they are just slightly wider on the bottom i asked about it when i got mine and the guy said that they were revised the rubber seal doesnt exist on the uk ones certainly not for the 1.8 maybe the 1.6 ones are different or maybe only available in the us

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cant believe that the garage would not look at this when they know its a problem, also that they tried to fob you off when you took it back. storys like this annoy me! you did the right thing doing it yourself anyway bud, you know that its done right then, they would have alost certainly done a crap job anyway!

glad you got it fixed in the end!

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Cheers mate, but what I cannot get my head around is this:

From the selling garage, I've heard the argument for leaking core plugs. But water extracted is clear, and no loss of water from coolant reservoir since I bought it a year ago. That's assuming the problem did not exist at time the garage did it's pre sale service and MOT.

So if it only leaves the washer jet explanation, and lets be fair the consensus of opinion on the web supports that. Even my local Ford Dealer said it was that, and that they sold loads of the revised washer jets, hence they carried them in stock.

So how the hell does the water get past those rubber stoppers that you press into the spark plug holes in the top cover ? Does it sit on the cover and seep past the big rubber grommet between the ports 2 and 3?

Anyway I went for a twenty mile round trip last night, and no over night rain. This morning I took HT leads off plugs one and two and took photo's

Plug0ne.jpg

PlugTwo.jpg

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I took the rubber grommet out and where it sat on the cover, there was a ring of wet outlining where the grommet touched the cover. And in Plug Port 4 [far left] a tiny tiny bead of clear water on the side wall nearest the coil pack.

You know I'm leaning to the idea that this water is when ambient damp air the kind you get in winter, meets the hot engine and maybe turns to steam than as the engine cools it condensates and settles in the lowest point of the engine block, which is those two Spark Plug Wells.

Anyway because I just love messing, I've decided to give the cleaned area and the metal bases of the spark plugs a coat of Hammerite Kurust for good measure, will post photo's latter to day.

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Well when the engine had been heated up, it finished up not much different look wise. And as I was driving it after it warmed up, it started to miss fire. Took the HT leads off the plugs and they were ringing wet. So that was obviously some moisture from the Kurust.

Block heats up,warm air hits HT composite covers,more so to the top of them [as in raising hot air] that sit on the spark plugs. Anyway dried them off and all is OK now.

P1

P1.jpg

P2

P2.jpg

P3

P3.jpg

P4

P4.jpg

So that's it, but will take a peek at them say in a week or so after we have had some rain. And in future prior to servicing, I will check them to see if the spark plug wells need vacuum out prior to removing the SP's

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Well when the engine had been heated up, it finished up not much different look wise. And as I was driving it after it warmed up, it started to miss fire. Took the HT leads off the plugs and they were ringing wet. So that was obviously some moisture from the Kurust.

Block heats up,warm air hits HT composite covers,more so to the top of them [as in raising hot air] that sit on the spark plugs. Anyway dried them off and all is OK now.

P1

P1.jpg

P2

P2.jpg

P3

P3.jpg

P4

P4.jpg

So that's it, but will take a peek at them say in a week or so after we have had some rain. And in future prior to servicing, I will check them to see if the spark plug wells need vacuum out prior to removing the SP's

idwe carefully remove th eplugs and on the threads rub a very small amount of copper grease onto them just incase it will be easier to get the plugs out and stoip them from rusting to the head tampons are great for soaking up the water just push it down with a screwdriver with the plugs in obviously let it soak the water up and pull out

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head tampons
what ever next :D

Yes I was thinking about taking them out and lubing the threads a bit. And whilst I used to have kit like a spark plug socket and feeler gauges, I haven't now. So I rang my man up this morning and asked him if he thought it may be a problem removing them next year, without them being lubed now. He reckoned they would not be a problem.

But I'm with you on this one, if you have the kit to hand do it.

Getting back to the lying water, anybody having the issue but not the time to mess about. I'd advocate running the car with the large rubber grommet [sat between plugs 2 and 3] out on a bit of a journey. I reckon that could shift a lot or possibly all of the water simply by the process of evaporation..............nothing lost if it don't work. So anybody trying it, let the board know how you go on.

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Update:

As it was raining all night last night, this morning I looked in the engine bay [first wiping the bonnet dry before I lifted it] And even though I had tried sealing the original washer jets from under the bonnet. It appears in both cases that a little water leaked past them, some into the trough of the plastic cover over the spark plug wells [via offside washer hole] And evidence of drips onto that plastic cover to the left of the battery cover [via nearside washer hole] Now as I said it was minimal, I should have photographed it, but only thought about that for the benefit of the forum after I had wiped it with a tissue.

But like I have said before, any water that gets into the spark plug wells is heated up by the engine and must bubble up as it boils [this has been proved by looking at photos of the HT lead stalks on spark plugs three and four, that sit engine side of the rubber bungs sealing the HT lead openings in the plastic engine top cover. Spark Plugs one and two don't show this rust colouring on their stalks, because they were not sat in water once spark plug one was removed for inspection, as the water had drained into the combustion chamber of plug one.

Now if that water boils the resultant steam must rise, yet it does not escape because the HT openings in the plastic cover are water/steam tight.So water cannot get into the wells via the HT leads. That leaves the rubber grommet in the plastic engine cover between SP opening two and three. Now it maybe the case that water collecting in the trough of the plastic engine cover is leaking into the SP wells via this grommet opening. In my particular case this morning the water was minimal, and because the drive slopes font to back of the car, but also on the horizontal to the left. The water collected in a corner but in any case it did not even cover the width of the plastic trough.

Now when I have had this grommet out when there was the original water trapped in the SP wells. It left a wet ring on the plastic cover. This was after running the engine, was it trapped steam condensate now on cooling reverting to water? Was it evidence of water trying to get in, or steam tying to get out, who knows? So I may just remove it and apply some silicone sealant to it and pop it back in place. So I'm still not going to spend £24 on new washer jets as I think they will still let a little water past them, much the same as the originals are doing now after seating them in with silicone sealant [ as your are working blind when trying to seal them under the bonnet because of its double skinned.

Anyway next time it rains I photograph the water collected.

Also I reckon those two threaded bolt points in the plastic engine cover are there to facilitate an engine cover, pity Ford where to tight to fit one.

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Update:

As it was raining all night last night, this morning I looked in the engine bay [first wiping the bonnet dry before I lifted it] And even though I had tried sealing the original washer jets from under the bonnet. It appears in both cases that a little water leaked past them, some into the trough of the plastic cover over the spark plug wells [via offside washer hole] And evidence of drips onto that plastic cover to the left of the battery cover [via nearside washer hole] Now as I said it was minimal, I should have photographed it, but only thought about that for the benefit of the forum after I had wiped it with a tissue.

But like I have said before, any water that gets into the spark plug wells is heated up by the engine and must bubble up as it boils [this has been proved by looking at photos of the HT lead stalks on spark plugs three and four, that sit engine side of the rubber bungs sealing the HT lead openings in the plastic engine top cover. Spark Plugs one and two don't show this rust colouring on their stalks, because they were not sat in water once spark plug one was removed for inspection, as the water had drained into the combustion chamber of plug one.

Now if that water boils the resultant steam must rise, yet it does not escape because the HT openings in the plastic cover are water/steam tight.So water cannot get into the wells via the HT leads. That leaves the rubber grommet in the plastic engine cover between SP opening two and three. Now it maybe the case that water collecting in the trough of the plastic engine cover is leaking into the SP wells via this grommet opening. In my particular case this morning the water was minimal, and because the drive slopes font to back of the car, but also on the horizontal to the left. The water collected in a corner but in any case it did not even cover the width of the plastic trough.

Now when I have had this grommet out when there was the original water trapped in the SP wells. It left a wet ring on the plastic cover. This was after running the engine, was it trapped steam condensate now on cooling reverting to water? Was it evidence of water trying to get in, or steam tying to get out, who knows? So I may just remove it and apply some silicone sealant to it and pop it back in place. So I'm still not going to spend £24 on new washer jets as I think they will still let a little water past them, much the same as the originals are doing now after seating them in with silicone sealant [ as your are working blind when trying to seal them under the bonnet because of its double skinned.

Anyway next time it rains I photograph the water collected.

Also I reckon those two threaded bolt points in the plastic engine cover are there to facilitate an engine cover, pity Ford where to tight to fit one.

sorry to hear they are still leaking!

what sealent did you try?

i know it can be a real pain to keep water out when it keeps wanting to get in!

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sorry to hear they are still leaking!

what sealent did you try?

i know it can be a real pain to keep water out when it keeps wanting to get in!

Everflex premium clear silicone sealant, for UPVCu frames, glazing and general construction purposes. I think the issue is getting the sealant in the actual spot you want it, as outlined in my post...only a small hole on the outer double skin of the bonnet,from whence you can try and apply the sealant....in other words..... working blind.

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Had another go at applying sealant to the underside of the bonnet around the washers. This time because it was earlier in the day [instead of late afternoon] I could see what I was doing. :rolleyes:

Just need a good downpour now to see how it stands up to it, but I'm quietly confident. :ph34r:

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well we got some overnight rain, and below is the result

Below OS washer

211010.jpg

Below NS washer

NSwiper.jpg

So I thought bugger, I'll bite the bullet and invest in the revised washer jets.

So £25.69 later......I take the old washer jets out. Now I never actually removed the old ones completely, when I applied silicone sealant to the bonnet.

But you can see the sealant stuck to the bonnet, in fact it was a right bugger to remove.

bonnetslot.jpg

But on removing the old washers completely I noticed they had gaskets on them. But I noticed the new washers seemed a tad bigger. It was easier to see putting the New and Old gaskets side by side. Plus when set into the bonnet they felt tighter and a lot harder to remove. Plus the new gaskets where a lot cleaner, the old ones had nobbly bits where they no doubt split from the mould that formed them.

gaskets.jpg

Now I thought when fitting them I wont go for the ...whole seating them in silcone sealant, then back sealing under the bonnet. I thought it better to do it one step at a time until I find out [for the benefit of others with this problem] what you need to do to fix the problem.

Also I do two tests, one being that I either wait for overnight rain, or play a hose on the bonnet, and see what the results are.

Then the second test is, I fire up the washer jets and monitor the results under the bonnet.

Best results I got using the old washer jets was as follows, test one I refer you to the two opening photo's in this post. they failed. Test two both washer jets passed the test, no water under bonnet.

Now the same tests with the new revised washer jets, straight out of the packet so to speak.

OS washer jet leaking on to spark plug well, NS washer jet no leaks.

Then I had occasion to speak to a plumber visiting else where, and I allowed him to park off road because it's all double yellow lines around us.I said I bet you think I'm mad just stood here playing water onto the bonnet, any how I tell him the tale... sealant this sealant that and the old ones still leaked. He went to the boot of his car and came back with a jar, took the lid of and said get your self a big dollop of that out, trust me this stuff works. And what was it called "Silicone Grease" its Vaseline like in texture.

So you see, if you do a good turn to others you sometimes get re paid with a good turn back, he was in a BMW as well....who said BMW drivers haven't got a heart :D

So I remove the jets, liberally smear the silicone grease between jets and gasket, gasket and bonnet. Refit and do Test One, NO LEAKS. So I then go on to Test Two, fire up the washers . OS washer does not leak onto engine, but NS washer appears to leak where the pipe under the bonnet connects to the washer jet.

later.jpg

I try applying silicone grease but it still leaks, but not surprised really because the pipe fits over a cone like plastic nozzle. Below is a picture of one of the old washer jets, but it is representative of the new jets nozzles.

oldnozzel.jpg

Anyway I've back filled the offending nozzle where it meets the water pipe with silicone sealant. I'm allowing it to set overnight before I test it. So you will have to wait until then to see if I've cracked it.

If that fails it's onto Plan C......a gutter :rolleyes:

But I do think in regard to rain water ingress the "silicone grease" looks like it's the stuff you need to apply. Maybe it would have worked applied the same way to the old washer jets as the new ones. But like I say the new ones are a better fit with better quality gaskets.

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It rained quite heavy last night, went out to the car lifted the bonnet and......

EUREKA!

Tried Test Two and again..........

EUREKA!

So on reflection, maybe that silicone grease would have worked on my old washer and gasket combo. But for previously stated reasons, in my case I doubt it would. But to anybody else finding they have this problem, I would say first lay your hands on some silicone grease remove the washer jets from the bonnet, apply liberally and refit, half hour job tops. You may just be lucky, but if not, and you have to buy the revised washer jets, your still going to need the silicone grease.

I suspect the board would be interested to hear [i know I would] any feed back if somebody does try the fix on the their old washer jets.

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Update,

three months on, no repeat of the problem, plug ports are as dry as snuff.

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Hi,

Not sure anyone is still reading this thread but would like to ask a bit of advice.

I've just been through almost exactly what Catch describes in this thread. Don't know what I'd have done without the info here.

Had a garage suggest I have a new engine head at around £800 at one point. Thankfully avoided that. I've had the 2 core plugs replaced and the engine head tested for leaks/cracks etc. It is sound and there is currently no water in there. There is the tiniest bit of condensation on the rubber plugs that fit in the top of the spark plug well but I think this is caused by the remnants of water that was previously in there. I will remove the rubber plugs after every journey that I can to allow this to escape.

I notice on an old service sheet that Ford had noted water ingress in to the spark plug well - but I appear to have the OLD washer jets!

It is almost definitely this which is causing water to leak onto the engine and eventually end up round the spark plugs.

There were 2 big drips directly under the washer jets after a load of rain at the weekend.

Yesterday I got 2 new washer jets. Fitted them along with some silicone grease.

Drivers side washer jet and connection do not leak after rain or when washers turned on! (the critical side I think when considering the spark plug well - you won't believe the piece of mind this has given me!).

Passenger side: still a bit of water coming through after rain and when washer switched on. As someone mentioned - probably important to avoid water here too - as near battery.

Just wondering how you managed to prevent the leak on this side? You mentioned backfilling the nozzle. Can you go into a bit more detail on that?

I'm going to try and take the jet off on that side tonight and put grease between the gasket & jet, gasket and bonnet, and some under bonnet. Also between the connector and nozzle. How long should it take to set? I'll leave it overnight before testing.

If I can just get rid of the water there too I be soooo happy!

Once sorted, will it lead to any other potential problems? Worth greasing the spark plugs?

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Just wondering how you managed to prevent the leak on this side? You mentioned backfilling the nozzle. Can you go into a bit more detail on that?

ignore the reference to back filling, it was just part of the failed process I went through in seeing if a fix could be done without the need to revert to buying the new revised washer jets. Well the reality is the gasket that sits between jet and bonnet is all that needed revising.....now how cheap would they have been to replace....if they sold em separately, which they don't

I'm going to try and take the jet off on that side tonight and put grease between the gasket & jet, gasket and bonnet

That's the fix you need do no more. Don't wast your time stuffing any via the underside of the bonnet, you will just be wasting your time and grease.

Also between the connector and nozzle.

Yes that's right, smear some grease on the nozzle part of the washer jet prior to pressing the water pipe home.

How long should it take to set? I'll leave it overnight before testing.

No need to leave it over night, the silicone grease never sets, it just creates a seal between the two surfaces it comes into contact with, hence plumbers use it to fix real time leaking connections. It is truly miracle stuff.

I've used it to fix a leaking water solenoid in a shower. As the leaking water burnt out the electrical coil of the solenoid. I just dissembled the neoprene diaphragm smear both sides of diaphragm with the grease. Reassembled, fit new coil and Bobs your Uncle.....and there is some fair pressure coming through that pipe.

Also last week fixed a long leaking cold tap in the bathroom. Dissembled tap, cleaned the crude built up around one of the two rubber ring seals, smeared them both with the grease. The actual tap washer was fine, no need to replace that............and again Bobs your Uncle.

Once sorted, will it lead to any other potential problems?

Nope

Worth greasing the spark plugs?

Again no, because the head is subject to extreme temperatures, that I would think make the sealing properties of the grease redundant. Besides the threads in the block are tapered, that is how the Spark plug seal works. And don't over tighten the Spark Plugs, that could lead to problems of them shearing off at a later service, as Fords maintenance schedule has plugs to change every three years, just a nice "nip up" will do it.

Besides you will have solved the problem of water ingress, my plug ports are still dry as snuff.

By the way welcome to the forum.

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Ha Ha, missed a good programme on telly cause i was so engrossed in this thread. Glad it all worked out in the end.

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