Hen Pecked

Lies And More Lies

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should have bought the derv, and if you regularly do 300 miles a day then surely moving closer to the destination would have been a more worthwile investment.

let me take you up on your comment on the lab condition tests. the reason ALL MANUFACTURERS test all their engines in ultra sterile conditions IS NOT to boost their mpg claims but to get a level resulst accross all makes and modelas, remember in science at school when we had to explain how we made the test fair??? this is how they do it. VW/ford/land rover/ whoever, they all use lab conditions without the wheels on attached to a dyno is to allow us the consumer make an informed decision when looking at the stats without witnessing bias.

if you look at any manufacture you'll see bloated mpg figures.

i'd just like to add that i can achieve and regularly beat fords quoted figures on the 1.6 diesel. i'm currently averaging 71.2mpg, this will go down when i go back to work next week and experience the grim journey to work, however my all time record of average over a full tank is something like 70.9mpg.. this is not worked via the trip rather by good old maths :)

methinks you deffo bought the wrong car, and using the x amount of daily miles requires an auto is lazy, the likelyhood is you'll be on the straights for miles upon miles not needing a gear change for long periods of time.

i love my fiesta, and i love the derv. i might be biased, but i went from ford ownership to toyota back to ford as i missed the feeling of a ford. the 'reliable' toyota vvtl-i engined celica gt was soo boring

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Yes Ford will stick it on a rolling road, and sit it there for a couple of days hooked up to a fuel hose to keep it running, and work it out from there, unless you're driving across Australia or America, your not going to match the distance!

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Just for the record.

We are OAPs who will only do about 3-4000 miles per year. This trip was to run the car in and get used to a different sort of vehicle.

Sadly, I know of no dealer who will let you use a car for a year and if you do not like it, let you trade it back at really good price.

I know that no one wants to admit that the car they bought was not up to expectations and that "they" can not only meet but exceed all stated performance figures, but the fact remains that unless you want to drive the majority of cars in in 5th gear at 20 MPH all of the time and ruin the drive train, then it is not possible to meet the manufacturers figures. There are exceptions, LR being one of them.

I counted back and have owned 27 cars in my life time. I have only bothered to check MPG on the last two due to the cost of fuel rising so much over the last 8 years. My 2.5TD5 auto Discovery bettered Land Rovers MPG and emission figures by quiet a way. It was only because we are now changing to a completely different life style that we sold it and bought the Fiesta.

The Fiesta itself has some very good points, plenty of room inside, comfortable, good control layout and excellent styling. The problem comes with quality which you only find out after owning it for a while. None of us believe half of the stories of woe on this forum until it happens to us.

We will probably keep it for three years and then with luck, I can convince my wife to go back to a nice 4 x 4 which will cope much better with the Yorkshire countryside and the wonderful effects of global warming (heavy snow, lower temperatures and foul winters...LOL)

In the meantime, I will grin and bear it and let her do the driving.

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37MPG is normal for a 1400 Auto. My 1.25 Manual gets 47, but it is a tiny engine!

I am puzzled by your statement that 37 MPG is normal for a 1400 auto engine.

Everything depends on the conditions and the state of the car.

Ford announce an extra urban figure of 54.3. We regularly read from these forum pages of owners exceeding the specs claimed from Ford so under almost perfect conditions I do not see why the 1.4 auto should be different.

We drove across the plains of Spain just two up, minimal luggage, correct tyre pressures, no extreme winds or bad weather and feathering the accelerator pedal and brakes. We managed a magnificent 41MPG for this part of our journey.

I can find no claim of 37MPG being normal from any official website or other source.

Sorry, but as a relatively experienced driver (nearly 50 years of driving including HGV) who has managed to exceed the MPG claimed by LandRover for a two ton 2.5TDi auto beast, I think I know how to get the maximum from my car. The Ford Fiesta is simply not anywhere near it's claimed figures and if 37MPG had been announced anywhere, I would have found it.

I am simply prepared to admit that I purchased a car thinking that the MPG would be better than it is and I am admit to my mistake.

P.S. The quality is still crap by any standard.

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No disrespect but all small engined autos in my area are owned by pensioners who's highlight of the week is a trip to the local garden centre.

How do you know that all pensioners in your area drive autos to there local garden centre?

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The original poster says he swaped 16 inch alloys for 14 inch steel. If the 14 inch wheel/tyre combo is smaller than the alloys that would account for less MPG

Sorry to burst this thought, but the alloys were fitted with low profile tyres while the steel wheels have high profile. The smaller 14" steel wheel with it's high profile tyre is actually a few cms bigger in overall diameter.

The low profile tyres with less "bounce" add to the buckling rim problem that so many are experiencing.

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This website shows real people uploading their mpg figures.

As you can see the 1.4 auto is getting between 26-36 mpg so you seem to be doing pretty well!

Agree with what's been said above, official mpg figures are not expected to be achieved in 'real-life' (although they can be) - they are merely a standard test across all vehicles to allow for a fair comparison.

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The quality is nowhere as bad as you're making out, you been in a Clio of late?

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I am puzzled by your statement that 37 MPG is normal for a 1400 auto engine.

Everything depends on the conditions and the state of the car.

Ford announce an extra urban figure of 54.3. We regularly read from these forum pages of owners exceeding the specs claimed from Ford so under almost perfect conditions I do not see why the 1.4 auto should be different.

We drove across the plains of Spain just two up, minimal luggage, correct tyre pressures, no extreme winds or bad weather and feathering the accelerator pedal and brakes. We managed a magnificent 41MPG for this part of our journey.

I can find no claim of 37MPG being normal from any official website or other source.

Sorry, but as a relatively experienced driver (nearly 50 years of driving including HGV) who has managed to exceed the MPG claimed by LandRover for a two ton 2.5TDi auto beast, I think I know how to get the maximum from my car. The Ford Fiesta is simply not anywhere near it's claimed figures and if 37MPG had been announced anywhere, I would have found it.

I am simply prepared to admit that I purchased a car thinking that the MPG would be better than it is and I am admit to my mistake.

P.S. The quality is still crap by any standard.

Good post... As far as I know, Jmurray is 14 or 15 and doesn't have a driving license...

MPG is never going to be as good as quoted. Our 1.6tdci gets about 52-54 instead of the quoted 64ish after 19k. That said, it is driven hard, so we're quite pleased with that figure!

Quality is not crap, but its not great. There are many cars with better quality, and also many with worse quality. Overall its ok, but there are a few too many rattles and squeaks, not to mention some cheapo plastic in places.

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Good post... As far as I know, Jmurray is 14 or 15 and doesn't have a driving license...

MPG is never going to be as good as quoted. Our 1.6tdci gets about 52-54 instead of the quoted 64ish after 19k. That said, it is driven hard, so we're quite pleased with that figure!

Quality is not crap, but its not great. There are many cars with better quality, and also many with worse quality. Overall its OK, but there are a few too many rattles and squeaks, not to mention some cheapo plastic in places.

Thanks for the points. All noted and taken on board. How I would have loved a larger diesel auto as a power pack..why oh why do they not offer one??

I guess I expect too much from car manufacturers. When you pay some £16K, you expect at least a car where the wheels do not buckle or the lid falls off the blanking spot on the dash board (so easy to have put a tray here). Even the plastic is thin and of poor quality.

Maybe the money is all in the engine quality, only time will tell. As this is my wife's car, I will keep quiet and let her enjoy it.

Good points are the amount of room inside and as it's a 3 door, it is very easy to get in and out of. I like the forward/rear parking sensors and the ability to use the gears sequentially in a manual mode. Very good when going down steep hills. The seating is comfortable and reasonably adjustable. The auto rain sensors and auto light switching are very useful. Could have done with electric memory seats though rather than the old pump up action for height and twist your back out of alignment when adjusting the rake.

So all in all, not what I would have chosen, but it suits SWMBO.

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Thanks for the points. All noted and taken on board. How I would have loved a larger diesel auto as a power pack..why oh why do they not offer one??

I guess I expect too much from car manufacturers. When you pay some £16K, you expect at least a car where the wheels do not buckle or the lid falls off the blanking spot on the dash board (so easy to have put a tray here). Even the plastic is thin and of poor quality.

Maybe the money is all in the engine quality, only time will tell. As this is my wife's car, I will keep quiet and let her enjoy it.

Good points are the amount of room inside and as it's a 3 door, it is very easy to get in and out of. I like the forward/rear parking sensors and the ability to use the gears sequentially in a manual mode. Very good when going down steep hills. The seating is comfortable and reasonably adjustable. The auto rain sensors and auto light switching are very useful. Could have done with electric memory seats though rather than the old pump up action for height and twist your back out of alignment when adjusting the rake.

So all in all, not what I would have chosen, but it suits SWMBO.

You really have to remember its only a fiesta , the car won't fufil everyones needs , there is a car ford do called the ford focus

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Thanks for the points. All noted and taken on board. How I would have loved a larger diesel auto as a power pack..why oh why do they not offer one??

I guess I expect too much from car manufacturers. When you pay some £16K, you expect at least a car where the wheels do not buckle or the lid falls off the blanking spot on the dash board (so easy to have put a tray here). Even the plastic is thin and of poor quality.

Maybe the money is all in the engine quality, only time will tell. As this is my wife's car, I will keep quiet and let her enjoy it.

Good points are the amount of room inside and as it's a 3 door, it is very easy to get in and out of. I like the forward/rear parking sensors and the ability to use the gears sequentially in a manual mode. Very good when going down steep hills. The seating is comfortable and reasonably adjustable. The auto rain sensors and auto light switching are very useful. Could have done with electric memory seats though rather than the old pump up action for height and twist your back out of alignment when adjusting the rake.

So all in all, not what I would have chosen, but it suits SWMBO.

You really have to remember its only a fiesta , the car won't fufil everyones needs , there is a car ford do called the ford focus

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If you're looking for a large diesel automatic why did you get a Fiesta? As mitch84 said you could have got a Focus. Or even a Mondeo/C-MAX/S-MAX/Galaxy/Kuga.

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I have an automatic 1.4 Titanium Fiesta which is a year old next month with just over 10,000 on the clock.

It has a full bodykit and I opted for the 16" 7-spoke alloys from new.

The MPG isn't as stated by Ford's official figures - not far off mind - but I do think Ford were telling porkies when they announced the auto's MPG. I can only assume they stuck it on a rolling road instead of normal everyday driving conditions; traffic, motorway, B roads, etc.

As for the quality of materials/build etc; mine's the 3-door so it was built in Germany. Overall, both the build quality & materials seem good - quite acceptable. I did realise when I bought the car that it was a Ford after all - so I wasn't expecting the same standard as a DB9 or a BMW even! Nothing has dropped or fallen off (yet), and there are no leaks, squeaks or rattles. The only 'problem' I have had was both electric front windows refused to lower when they were covered in ice recently, due to the freak sub-zero temperatures recently of course. I have been a tad lucky with regards the buckled alloys as I've managed to steer clear (literally) of the numerous potholes on the shocking roads of Hampshire and indeed Dorset!

It's due its first service early next month in January when it will be a year old - by which time it will have about 10,600 miles on the clock.

But as far as its (first) year-old report goes thus far: 8 out of 10. Looks fab in 'squeeze' with the full bodykit & optional alloys . . . but would also have loved the option of a 1.6 DSG 7-speed box like the fabulous award-winning VW automatics are these days. Come on Ford - pull your finger out!

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. The seating is comfortable and reasonably adjustable. The auto rain sensors and auto light switching are very useful. Could have done with electric memory seats though rather than the old pump up action for height and twist your back out of alignment when adjusting the rake.So all in all, not what I would have chosen, but it suits SWMBO.

I'm beginning to think along the lines of some other posters and you have defiantly bought the wrong car.

The fiesta is supposed to be a reasonable price small car and I think by the time you have added every thing you desire the price would be so great no-one would buy it.

Quality wise it is comparable to other small cars (i.e. Corsa) and for similar money. And the Fiesta, as you know, has some useful features - many that you most certainly would not find on your old Landrover (a vehicle which I would think costs a lot more than a fiesta)

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I have an automatic 1.4 Titanium Fiesta which is a year old next month with just over 10,000 on the clock.

It has a full bodykit and I opted for the 16" 7-spoke alloys from new.

The MPG isn't as stated by Ford's official figures - not far off mind - but I do think Ford were telling porkies when they announced the auto's MPG. I can only assume they stuck it on a rolling road instead of normal everyday driving conditions; traffic, motorway, B roads, etc.

As for the quality of materials/build etc; mine's the 3-door so it was built in Germany. Overall, both the build quality & materials seem good - quite acceptable. I did realise when I bought the car that it was a Ford after all - so I wasn't expecting the same standard as a DB9 or a BMW even! Nothing has dropped or fallen off (yet), and there are no leaks, squeaks or rattles. The only 'problem' I have had was both electric front windows refused to lower when they were covered in ice recently, due to the freak sub-zero temperatures recently of course. I have been a tad lucky with regards the buckled alloys as I've managed to steer clear (literally) of the numerous potholes on the shocking roads of Hampshire and indeed Dorset!

It's due its first service early next month in January when it will be a year old - by which time it will have about 10,600 miles on the clock.

But as far as its (first) year-old report goes thus far: 8 out of 10. Looks fab in 'squeeze' with the full bodykit & optional alloys . . . but would also have loved the option of a 1.6 DSG 7-speed box like the fabulous award-winning VW automatics are these days. Come on Ford - pull your finger out!

You do realise that's how every manufacturer attains their figures, don't you?

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You do realise that's how every manufacturer attains their figures, don't you?

tried explaining this many a time, its just to level the playing field for our benefit. people don't wana know, ah well.

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tried explaining this many a time, its just to level the playing field for our benefit. people don't wana know, ah well.

I know pal, this sort of topic has been running for almost 2 years now and some people still haven't got a clue and never will.

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Sorry to burst this thought, but the alloys were fitted with low profile tyres while the steel wheels have high profile. The smaller 14" steel wheel with it's high profile tyre is actually a few cms bigger in overall diameter.

The low profile tyres with less "bounce" add to the buckling rim problem that so many are experiencing.

You have pointed to a significant error in your MPG calculations. The enhanced rolling-circumference of the fat rubber on steel wheels totally raises the final-drive gearing of the car, and mess with the calibration of your odometer, as it will now be understating the miles travelled, on all your travels.

By the way, running-in needs some revving periods, with the engine hot, to bed-in the piston-rings to the steel bore-liners, and minimise oil-usage, and loosen it up. Driving like an octogenarian is very bad for engines, as bore-wear does not extend far enough up the cylinders, so piston-rings are known to shatter when a younger driver extends the revs.,later.

Ultra-gentle driving just polishes the bores, preventing cutting-in of the cast-iron rings to bed-into the steel bore inserts. Once polished, bedding-in can't be done.

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