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Azzalee19

Mk1 tdci mot failure + problems

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Hi guys, just help/advice needed. Car just failed mot so fixing her up. One failure was needing new tyres. Now the back ones ( or just one, can't remember now) needed replacing as they had worn on the inside of the tyre. Any one had this before and know the cause? Also abs light was on, I've replaced a bearing hoping that was the issue but isn't. Also when I start the car white smoke comes out the back for10 + second ( only in the cold) also the idle is rough u til car warms up. Also has an oil leak. I've had a look from the top and bottom of the car but it's hard to tell as there's oil spluttered about the place. Also the turbo isn't boosting at 100% . I would say 70%.. Any help greatly appreciated with the huge task at hand 😖😖

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10 hours ago, Azzalee19 said:

One failure was needing new tyres. Now the back ones ( or just one, can't remember now) needed replacing as they had worn on the inside of the tyre. Any one had this before and know the cause?

Hi Aaron, uneven wear on a tyre can be caused by the wheel alignment being out.  Some places just do front wheel alignment but I think getting 4 wheel alignment is the best way to go. I think tyre pressures can cause that too (under inflated or over inflated) over a period of time. Do you check your tyre pressures regularly?

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Not really , just occasionally when putting more air in. Thanks I'll get that done .

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underinflated tyres causes the edges to wear but both edges of one tyre would wear if that was the cause. one edge means there is something wrong with camber/alignment 

To be honest unless it is horrendous uneven wear I would just put up with it, you could easily spend more on trying to sort it out than replacing the tyre slightly sooner than it would otherwise last. Don't forget, if you pay to have the alignment done you will not know if it's been done right until the next tyre wears out.

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21 hours ago, Azzalee19 said:

when I start the car white smoke comes out the back for10 + second ( only in the cold) also the idle is rough u til car warms up.

Probably one or more glowplugs failed. I had that a few weeks ago. Below about 7C, It started fine, but gave clouds of smoke, and seemed like it was on two cylinders for about 10 sec, then it was fine once warmed up a bit. I replaced two plugs, one of which was definitely duff, and it has been ok since. The duff plug was hard to remove, it unscrewed ok, but then stuck in its hole. When removed, it had a bulge between the thread and the sealing chamfer.

ABS fault may just be a bad contact or broken wire. It would help to find out which wheel it is. Forscan will run on Mk1 Foci, and should be able to identify the faulty wheel.

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18 hours ago, isetta said:

underinflated tyres causes the edges to wear but both edges of one tyre would wear if that was the cause. one edge means there is something wrong with camber/alignment 

To be honest unless it is horrendous uneven wear I would just put up with it, you could easily spend more on trying to sort it out than replacing the tyre slightly sooner than it would otherwise last. Don't forget, if you pay to have the alignment done you will not know if it's been done right until the next tyre wears out.

Thanks for the advice. Just concerns me as they only failed on mot because of the wear on the insides . Rest of the tyre is fine. 

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14 hours ago, Tdci-Peter said:

Probably one or more glowplugs failed. I had that a few weeks ago. Below about 7C, It started fine, but gave clouds of smoke, and seemed like it was on two cylinders for about 10 sec, then it was fine once warmed up a bit. I replaced two plugs, one of which was definitely duff, and it has been ok since. The duff plug was hard to remove, it unscrewed ok, but then stuck in its hole. When removed, it had a bulge between the thread and the sealing chamfer.

ABS fault may just be a bad contact or broken wire. It would help to find out which wheel it is. Forscan will run on Mk1 Foci, and should be able to identify the faulty wheel.

How much is it usually to get it plugged in? And I'll have a look at spark plugs. Which I've never done before. Is it easy to do?

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45 minutes ago, Azzalee19 said:

How much is it usually to get it plugged in?

At a Fraud Stealer (aka Ford dealer), up to £100 just to have a look.

If you have a Windows laptop, you can get the adapter you need to run Forscan for £16 or less, and the software download is free. A bit more if want to run it on a smart phone/pad/thing, using iOS or Android. For more on Forscan, see:

I am not sure what engine you have. Your profile just says tdci. I have only done glowplugs on the 1.8tdci, and it was easier than it looked, but does need the right tools and equipment.

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2 hours ago, Tdci-Peter said:

A bit more if want to run it on a smart phone/pad/thing, using iOS or Android. For more on Forscan, see

The Forscan lite app from playstore on android is £3.50 but very much worth it!

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What adapt or would I need for an I phone? Also is it on Apple Store? Thanks

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5 hours ago, Tdci-Peter said:

At a Fraud Stealer (aka Ford dealer), up to £100 just to have a look.

If you have a Windows laptop, you can get the adapter you need to run Forscan for £16 or less, and the software download is free. A bit more if want to run it on a smart phone/pad/thing, using iOS or Android. For more on Forscan, see:

I am not sure what engine you have. Your profile just says tdci. I have only done glowplugs on the 1.8tdci, and it was easier than it looked, but does need the right tools and equipment.

I have 1.8 tdci , 53 plate . 👍

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1 hour ago, Azzalee19 said:

What adapt or would I need for an I phone?

The tunnelrat link (https://tunnelrat-electronics.fwscart.com/) has both bluetooth & WiFi adapters now, which are warranted to work with Forscan. I think iOS usually has WiFi as a default, but could be wrong there!

In the past, WiFi ELM adapters have been very problematic, so it is worth getting one tested with Forscan.

I will check & write up the tools & methods needed to test & remove 1.8TDCI glowplugs shortly. Though no doubt there is a YouTube video of it somewhere. It looks hard because the plugs are partly hidden under all the injector piping, and you certainly should not disturb any of that. But they are just accessible with the right tools, it needs a strong magnetic socket for the cable nuts, because it is impossible to get fingers onto some of them.

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On 05/03/2017 at 4:45 PM, Azzalee19 said:

I have 1.8 tdci , 53 plate

A very quick guide to Testing & Replacing 1.8TDCI glowplugs

I meant to get some photos while doing the job, but I had to abort after doing two because it started raining, and it is cold & wet now, so I am wimping out of doing outside photos!

The main tools needed are in the photo below. From the top:

A 7mm a/f socket, with adapters & extension. For the wire connection nut.

A magnet on a probe. I used another socket, and a 10mm dia neodyniuim magnet taped to it. Something like this is needed to remove & replace the wire connection nut.

Optional: An M4 female hex pillar, with a long M4 screw or stud. This is for pulling and rotating plugs that stick in the hole.

A 10mm a/f long reach socket, with extension. The one I used was only just long enough, but it did the job.

New Glowplugs. Also point nose & flat nose pliers. Multimeter for testing plugs.

-----------------------

I think this job is best done with a warm engine. It may make the removal easier, and allows for using freezer spray on tight plugs, to get some differential contraction of the plug. So do it after a drive, though let the engine cool a little if it is at full operating temperature.

Start at the timing belt end, where the connecting wire ends. Loosen the wire nut, until the top of it is just above the top of the threaded part of the plug stud. If it looks like the cable ring crimp is turning, try to support the crimp with point nose pliers while turning the nut.

For those nuts that fingers can not reach, use the magnet to turn the nut until it is free, and very carefully withdraw it. Guide the magnet carefully though the surrounding metal parts. If it sticks to anything, it may dislodge the nut, which will then tumble down into the engine somewhere. It may be worth wrapping some paper or cloth around below the plug to try to catch escaping nuts.

Proceed along the plugs, removing all the nuts. Then starting from the timing belt end, lift off the cable. It should be fairly easy to just move it a little to one side, so it is out of the way of the plugs.

Now the plugs can be tested. It is very difficult to test them while connected together. They register almost a short circuit on a multimeter (under 1 ohm), and draw a very high current when operating, that drops quite rapidly as the plugs heat up. So current measurements are not easy. When disconnected, a multimeter from the plug connection stud to a suitable earth point on the engine should give almost short circuit. Check what the meter reads when both probes are on metal parts of the engine. Any plug that reads much more than that reference reading is suspect. I had one that read from 30ohms to over 100ohms, it was dead.

If any new plugs are needed, it is worth buying 4. It is not essential to replace them all at once, it can be done as needed, but the rest are likely to fail sooner or later. Bosch ones have a good reputation. I used GLP024 plugs, off Ebay for £25 for 4 inc vat & delivery. The seller was Whybee ltd. They should come in sealed boxes, with a security sticker on one end, to show they are genuine.

Removal and replacement can be very easy, the first one I tried came out with no fuss. If the area around the plugs looks dirty, some volatile cleaner like meths might help clean it before removal, but the area is very hard to get at. Just make sure there is no obvious loose dirt or bits that can fall down the hole when the plug is removed.

Stuck plugs are another matter. If the thread is tight, hold the ratchet with one hand on the end of the handle, one on the ratchet end, applying equal force in opposing directions. This avoids any side force on the plug. A long Tee bar handle can also be used, again applying a pure torque with no side force. Impact from a small hammer may help, if done while continuing to apply a steady torque. An impact driver may work. But bear in mind this is not a 19mm wheel nut. With just a 10mm hex, the socket could split, the corners of the hex could round off, or even the plug could break. Any damage to the plug like that will be a disaster, so proceed with caution. WD40 or Plus Gas may help, but use sparingly.  Freezer spray applied down inside the socket to cool the plug may help by contracting the plug slightly. Though if the plug is too cold (near or below freezing), it may become more brittle, and more likely to fracture. Persistence without too much brute force usually pays off in such cases. I have spent an hour loosening tight bolts etc. on a few occasions.

Another problem is that it undoes, but feels stiff, and will not withdraw once it reaches the end of its thread. I had this on one, it turned out to have a slight bulge in the plug, inside the hole. This was the duff plug. Use WD40 or similar very sparingly. Remember that everything that goes down that hole is going to go into the combustion chamber, then out through the valves, turbo & cat. Keep rotating the plug. I used the M4 pillar and blunt nose pliers to push and pull it, while rotating. Some plugs are almost impossible to grip with pliers. Eventually it very slowly worked a bit looser, and gradually eased out.

The specified tightening torque is 15nm, so do not over tighten the new plugs.

I found it reasonably easy to fit the wire back on the plugs, using the pliers. Where needed, use the magnet to position the nuts, again carefully guiding it in. Turn the nut to engage the thread and pull the magnet away. Do not overtighten the M4 nuts. It is better to re-check after a few journeys, than to risk stripping the thread or damaging the plug.

 

GLOWPLG1.JPG

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On 5 March 2017 at 11:38 AM, Tdci-Peter said:

At a Fraud Stealer (aka Ford dealer), up to £100 just to have a look.

If you have a Windows laptop, you can get the adapter you need to run Forscan for £16 or less, and the software download is free. A bit more if want to run it on a smart phone/pad/thing, using iOS or Android. For more on Forscan, see:

I am not sure what engine you have. Your profile just says tdci. I have only done glowplugs on the 1.8tdci, and it was easier than it looked, but does need the right tools and equipment.

I have 1.8 tdci , 53 plate . 👍

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Thanks for that, does anybody have any suggestions on oil leak? And if it's any connection with turbo and bad start up? Thanks I would put some pictures up but not sure how to put them on from my photo album?

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6 minutes ago, Azzalee19 said:

I would put some pictures up but not sure how to put them on from my photo album?

Direct links to the photo album could be pasted into a reply, but if the album is private to you, it may not be readable by others.

The best way would be to download pictures (eg right click & save image) to a hard drive or USB stick. Then open open a folder containing the copies, and drag the entries you want into the paperclip marked area at the bottom of the reply window on this site.

Also how much oil is being lost, are you having to top up regularly.

Oil being sprayed around the engine compartment does not have any obvious link with turbo or startup. Maybe a crankcase breather hose has split or come dis-attached?

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Forgot to mention I'm on my phone. 2 are from underneath the car and most just to show where the oil has got onto. Also two are I think from coolant tank or radiator ( white/pink residue )

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