Tdci-Peter

True Ford Enthusiast
  • Content count

    2,513
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    17

Tdci-Peter last won the day on January 15

Tdci-Peter had the most liked content!

5 Followers

About Tdci-Peter

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Peter
  • Gender*
    Male
  • Ford Model
    1.8 TDCI Mk2 Focus
  • Ford Year
    2006
  • UK/Ireland Location
    Dorset
  • Interests
    General Automotive
    Computers & Electronics

Recent Profile Visitors

7,681 profile views
  1. One of the pressure switches or sensors can detect too high a pressure, that can be caused by the condenser (in the front) being too hot. Then moving air will cool it down, so it can operate properly. You could check if the fan is still running when the A/C is on. But I suspect it is normal operation for it to not operate if too hot. Once running, and some of the refrigerant is liquid, then it should stay running.
  2. Tdci-Peter

    Intermittant Engine Malfunction on Dash

    Not really from those figures, there are no units, and the conditions (engine speed & load) are not given. If they are in kPa at idle, then 3kPa would be very high, and 0.3 is not bad, maybe a little high. A possibly better guide is the km to ashfull PID, that can be read by Forscan. This is an estimate of the state of the DPF, by the ECU. It can go up or down depending on how successful a regen was. Checking this occasionally over several weeks can give some clue of at least what the ECU thinks of the DPF.
  3. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    When Forscan is used to add keys, it does not programme the key. That usually has a fixed code built in. It programmes the car to accept the key. Adding keys is relatively safe, it should not disable any existing keys. It must generally be possible to re-use a key. If a key is stolen, and needs to be removed from the car's memory, the only way to do this is to erase all keys, then add all your existing keys back in. As the car will not remember whether they were used with this car before, or are new, or are from another car, it should accept all, as long as they are the right type. There are procedures on the Forscan website to check whether a key is the right type, basically just trying it in the ignition, then reading the error code if any. A right sort of key, but not programmed in this car will give a different error code to the wrong type of key that can not be recognised. One possible big pitfall is cloned keys. Many locksmiths and some internet sites will make you a working key, coded for your PATS, if you give them an existing working key. Certain non-OEM keys are re-programmable, and special equipment can copy the code from one key into another. This method will not yield the two keys needed after a key erase procedure. They will read as the same key. The original key and the replacement key from the other PCM will have two different codes, they will not be clones of each other. So that should not be a worry here. But it can be a problem in other circumstances.
  4. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    I am almost certain it will go back to the as built values, and then automatically learn the actual sensor calibrations just like a new car does. Have a look through the list of service procedures on Forscan. It will be different for each engine type. On the 1.6TDCI there is a separate learn EGR procedure, for example. On mine I think it just has reset injector values. There is a procedure for learning throttle values on some petrol engines that is a manual operation, something like turning ignition on for 1 minute without touching the throttle, then ign off. But I do not know if this applies to the 1.6 Petrol on the Focus.
  5. Tdci-Peter

    Intermittant Engine Malfunction on Dash

    If any of the pipes to the intercooler are loose, then there will be a hissing noise when the turbo ramps up. If the leaks are bad enough, it can give error codes like P0299 (turbo underboost).
  6. Tdci-Peter

    Mk4 Mondeo 2.0 TDCI Limp Mode

    Is the dip at time=242.0 sec? I see no obvious reason for it, though the sensor is doing some odd things, so may make the actuator move. The RPM continues to rise at pretty much the same rate after, as far as I can see. Looking at the sensor, it seems to have 3 pins, I would not be surprised if it was just a pot, which would have constant resistance between two pins, and a varying resistance from the third (pin 3 on the Focus 2L DW10 drawing) pin to either of the other two. It looks a bit as if the sticking out bit is a rod that moves axially rather then rotating, but it is hard to say from the photos. If it was some fancy electronic (eg Hall effect) sensor, then resistance readings would not be very meaningful, though comparison might give some clue.
  7. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    I have not tried it, to be honest. But there should be a "reset all adaptations" procedure in the list of service procedures for the PCM. That is what I would try.
  8. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    U2197 makes me wonder if the car the PCM came from did not have ABS. From the Forscan results, yours does have this. U2200 may be a mismatch between the IC mileage and PCM mileage, though as both are the replacements, it may be some other problem. If the car is cranking, and the PATS led has stopped its manic flashing, then PATS should not be the cause, it usually disables cranking as well as all other engine systems like fuel pump & injectors. But I am not sure what you mean by " the car cranks but refuses to turn over ". I guess it is that the starter turns the engine, but it will not fire up. The confusing bit is the IC is still indicating PATS problems (B1600, U2510). Try clearing DTCs with one of the IC codes showing as the selected DTC. I think Forscan only clears 1 module at a time. I think I would reset the PCM first, to see if I could get rid of some of the engine sensor errors like MAF & Throttle, before looking at the IC.
  9. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    Being able to connect to a live PCM is a huge step forward compared to nothing! Save a log of all the codes, though I see from above you have done that, and definitely clear the DTCs. Seeing what comes back will separate real problems from ghosts caused by other events. The PCM lists problems with almost all of the major engine systems, some of these may be just that it needs to learn the new sensor calibration values. No PATS problems. The IC lists 2 PATS related problems, these may be old. See if they return. I am ignoring ACM & ABS DTCs at the moment, as not likely to be relevant to starting.
  10. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    Fuse 30 missing is odd. Across all the Mk2/2a engine variant drawings, this is a 3A fuse for a Keep Alive supply to the PCM. There are a few reports on the net about PCM problems if this is blown. If the contact springs are present in the engine bay fusebox, I think I would try fitting a 3A fuse in there. There is not a lot to lose, Maybe some PCM variants do not need a keep alive supply, but most do. All I can think of at the moment!
  11. Tdci-Peter

    PATS error code 16 - 56 Reg Mk2 Focus

    DTC #05 - A103 = B2103 Transceiver internal antenna damaged. Replace transceiver. DTC #07 - 9681 = B1681 Transceiver signal not detected. These may suggest a problem with the little transceiver unit that is round the ignition key barrel. This is connected directly to the Cluster, so does not depend on the CAN bus for the cluster to be able to test it. However there are two reasons why this could be a red herring: It is not a type of fault that should prevent an ELM from connecting to the PCM via the CAN bus. Or it may have happened during one of the changes of parts, and be an old code now. With no way t delete codes (that I know of without a diagnostic system running), it is impossible to tell how recent the codes are. It is looking like a PCM fault. Have you double checked the PCM fuses, esp the 3A, F30, and the 20A, F9? Also you could re-try the other PCM. And also listen to or test relay R6, the PCM relay, to see if it is operating.
  12. Tdci-Peter

    Air con recharge kits

    On an older car, which has a very slow leak due to normal wear on the compressor seal, or especially if the family has two or more such cars, then the DIY canister is worth it. A slow leak would be a small top-up (a fraction of a canister) every 2 to 4 years. But a 2014 car with no a/c for some time really needs to be checked over and, if there are no serious leaks, be re-filled properly. If the pressure has completely gone, then some water vapour will have got in, and this will destroy the compressor unless the leak is fixed, the system is fully evacuated & re-filled with the correct oil to gas ratio. Not cheap, but a lot cheaper than a new compressor.
  13. Tdci-Peter

    Mk4 Mondeo 2.0 TDCI Limp Mode

    It looks like mad movement of the vane, but as you see on the Excell, it is just sitting on the +/- changeover point, and when corrected, the signal is quite stable apart from those little ramps at each sign change. So the vane is just quivering a bit, not surprising, and the sensor signal reading is veering between about +150 to -150. So it is all looking quite consistent at the moment. Have you considered back probing the sensor signal voltage when doing the vac. pump test? Probably easier said than done, due to limited access, and it would only serve to double check that it is a real fault, not some silly software glitch. Changing the sensor might be the easier option. It should then be quite easy to test the old sensor on the bench if any questions still remain.
  14. Tdci-Peter

    Mk4 Mondeo 2.0 TDCI Limp Mode

    Its software "wot I writ", it does not run on Windows, and only on certain (older!) hardware, so is not very portable! I wrote earlier this year as I wanted to compare the MAF readings with flow calculated from MAP & RPM on my car. And also I find the Forscan graph scrolling feature is very clumsy and clunky on my system. Especially on bigger runs. A CSV file is just a text file. I have tested the Microsoft Notepad utility, and it will chop it up. It is very easy to shorten it, just a bit of deft mouse work. In fact any portion(s) can be cut out, as long as the header line stays in place at the beginning. Each line has a time value as well as the data values, so any section will read ok. To delete big chunks of data, highlight a line by dragging the mouse cursor over it, then use the scroll bar to move through to the end or 2nd cut point, then press the shift key while dragging the mouse over the end line to be removed. All lines from the 1st highlight to the 2nd should turn blue (or whatever is your highlight colour), then press the delete key. That way, though a bit fiddly, should result in a .CSV file small enough for Excell to process. Looking at the sensor, it does not look like a load of gubbins will pop out of the actuator when removed, but access may be a problem as there is quite a lot of the sensor inside the actuator, so space is needed to withdraw it.
  15. Tdci-Peter

    Mk4 Mondeo 2.0 TDCI Limp Mode

    I can see from the traces that the arm is moving smoothly. The obvious error is the big jump. It could be a red herring, just a software error, but the ramps and the fact that the PCM is complaining about something related to that signal, does suggest it is a real error in the sensor. I can not see how the solenoid could cause such a consistent sensor shift, always at the same values. And the rest of the trace looks reasonable. I have managed to output a couple of pictures of the re-processed vane trace. One zoomed out a bit to show some changes, one zoomed in to highlight the ramps that happen exactly the same at each polarity change.