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rupertm88

Timing Belt Change Mk2.5

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Hi,

I am going to attempt a timing belt change on my MK2.5 Ford Focus (Duratec 1.6L 100ps, it has done 65000 miles). I have the following:

  • Timing belt kit from Ford (inc tensioner, timing belt and crankshaft bolt)
  • A draper timing lock kit (includes bar for camshafts and screw/pin for crankshaft)
  • Drive belt kit from Ford (2 drive belts and installation tools)
  • Replacement camshaft bolts
  • Axle stands (Up to 3t each)
  • Engine support bar (up to 500kg)
  • Trolley jack (Up to 3t)
  • Torque wrench and socket kit
  • Cam sprocket hold tool

A few questions:

1 ) Is 65k too early to do this if the belt is rated up to 100k (would it be better to wait until 75k so that i am not throwing away good parts)?

2 ) In the Ford Etis guide it shows a block of wood on a trolley jack which looks like its under the sump (to spread the load)...Is this correct? Wont i damage my sump if i do this?

3 ) Any tips on getting the crankshaft pulley off (ive read that it can be very difficult to get off, but you shouldn't use the timing locking screw/pin to hold it)?

4 ) Is there anything else i need and anything to watch out for when doing this (have never done this before)? I have a Ford Etis guide but it doesn't seem to be as detailed as a proper workshop manual....

Thanks in advance

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1. The specified changing interval of the timing belt is 100.000 Miles/8 Years (whichever comes first). Based on this interval there is no need to change your timing belt. I changed my timing belt after 8 Years at about 45.000 miles and the belt was pretty worn. In my opinion it is not a bad idea to change the belt sooner than the specified interval.

2. A suitable block of wood on a jack is used to support the engine after the engine mount has been removed. Correctly positioned this will not damage the sump. There is very little weight on the block/trolley.

3. The timing screw which locks the crankshaft is only used to achieve the correct belt timing. This screw can not be used to prevent the crankshaft from turning during removing/fastening the crank shaft pulley bolt. The timing screw can break easily when it is used to prevent the crankshaft from turning. The camshaft locking tool can also not be used to prevent the camshafts from turning during removing/fastening the camshaft pulley bolts.

DSC04613_zpsed0bnqus.jpg

To prevent the crankshaft/camshafts from turning I use a tool that I made myself. Similar tools are also available from tool suppliers. The pins on this tool can be inserted into the spokes/holes of the crankshaft/camshaft pulleys and stop it from rotating during removing/fastening the bolts.

Personally I use a big air wrench to remove the crankshaft pulley bolt. This bolt can be really (really) tight. Most time this bolt can not be removed with normal tools. To fasten the new bolt I use a Torque wrench and an angle gauge. Again this bolt is really tight and it requires a lot of force (while preventing the crankshaft from turning at the same time) to obtain the correct Torque/angle setting.

4. The procedure described in the Ford Etis manual will work fine. I used this procedure several times without any problems. Changing the timing belt on the 1.4/1.6 Duratec engines is relatively easy.

Personally I would also check the valve lash. If adjustment is necessary (which usually is not) the timing belt needs to be removed to remove the camshafts. Once removed the timing belts can not be used anymore and needs to be replaced. I have seen before that people who changed their timing belt needed to change it again within a year because the valve lash adjustment was out of specifications.

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Thanks for the replies really helpful stuff.

I have a few more questions:

  • Why do the cam sprockets need loosening during a timing belt change? How should they be positioned when replacing the bolts?
  • Is a flywheel lock and a torque wrench enough to loosen the crankshaft pulley? Do i need a special tool to re-install it (new bolt)?
  • Does the crankshaft pulley have a particular orientation
  • How can i support the engine from the sump? Where is the best place to support it? See picture below:

motor+sigma+2.jpg

Thanks for the help, this is my first time attempting such a job and don't want to ruin my car! :)

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The reason the pulleys don't have a woodruff key and also need loosening is to achieve perfect (or as near as possible) timing.

A flywheel locking tool will be enough to hold the flywheel solid while you undo the crank bolt. I use an air impact gun for them normally but a breaker bar will do it. Sometimes heating the head of the bolt with a torch for a short period also makes removal much easier.

The crankshaft pulley will only got one way, it will be quite obvious when you go to refit.

Use a jack and a large piece of wood under the sump.

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The camshaft pulleys need to be loosened to achieve the correct (perfect) timing.

A flywheel locking tool and a Torque wrench (of the correct capacity) should be enough but personally I would also use an angle gauge.

Note that all (timing belt) pulleys on this type of engine are keyless. The bolts used to secure the pulleys are stretch bolts. Stretch bolts can only be tightened once. You have to replace both the crankshaft bolt and the camshaft bolts. Also note that the crankshaft bolt has changed a few times during production. You have to make sure to use the correct type (length and thread diameter) of bolt. All different types of bolts used do also have different torque/degree settings.

Re-using the old stretch bolts or not fastening the bolts to the correct torque settings can easily result in engine damage. If you have never changed a timing belt the 1.4/1.6 Duratec is not the easiest type off engine to start with.

Also note that this type of engine has (2 different) stretch belts to drive the aircon pump, alternator, water pump and power steering pump. A strecht belts does not have tensioners and officially needs to be cut to remove it. This means you also need 2 new stretch belts and a stretch belt assembly tool.

My advice is to take pictures of all major parts before disassembly. Marking all parts before disassembly is also a good thing to do.

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I'm loving this thread here. some really good advice and I am making a list as well as I will be attempting this on my focus next summer. When Im doing mine I will take some pics and maybe try to put together a guide if I can. Rupert good luck I think if you follow the guides and have some sense you will be 100%. Just take the advice regarding bolts and renew all the stretch bolts and tighten to the correct torque specified in the guide/manual and all should be good.

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I took the starter off and used a piece of metal to lock the flywheel, it took 2 of us and a bar on my breaker bar to undo the nut.

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I took the starter off and used a piece of metal to lock the flywheel, it took 2 of us and a bar on my breaker bar to undo the nut.

A good bit of heat on the crankshaft bolt would have helped.

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I took the starter off and used a piece of metal to lock the flywheel, it took 2 of us and a bar on my breaker bar to undo the nut.

Exactly the method I have used twice.

I have just measured my breaker bar at 24 inches length with 1/2 in. square drive. A 6 flank impact strength short socket was required which I had to buy specially as there was not one in my toolbox.

It needed all my strength to move the crankshaft bolt. On the first attempt I lifted the engine off the wooden block, that bolt is really tight.

You might want to get a longer breaker bar!

Let us know how you get on.

ScaniaPBman.

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As for the 2 stretch belts, I have had them off and on several times, the advice to cut them off seems a little over the top to me. The long belt just drops off when you slacken off the metal pulley held on by 4 bolts (water pump pulley?).

The air con compressor stretch belt is not so easy, but can be eased off with a sturdy screw driver as you slowly rotate the crank. If the belt looks OK, that is no signs of cracking on the outside or on the ribs inside, then it goes back on.

HTH.

ScaniaPBman.

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Thanks for all the feedback guys - I was originally going to just replace just the timing belt/tensioner/bolts/drive belts is the water pump worth replacing at the same time? Am i just setting myself up for more work in the future if i dont do it at the same time?

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Thanks for all the feedback guys - I was originally going to just replace just the timing belt/tensioner/bolts/drive belts is the water pump worth replacing at the same time? Am i just setting myself up for more work in the future if i dont do it at the same time?

when I do mine I was wondering whether to change the water pump as well as from what I read in some threads is probably best to do it when you have all dismantled. I'm not sure of there is a way of checking it to see without removing it so I guess its maybe best to replace it when you are that far in.

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So i had a go at changing the timing belt this weekend. Struggled for quite a bit with the crank bolt but finally broke it loose.

I used:

  • An axle stand on some wood to support the extension bar from the socket.
  • A breaker bar (750mm) with a trolley handle over the end of the handle for increased leverage.
  • A camshaft holding tool wedged into the wishbone to stop the crank turning. Yep... :rolleyes: not great but all i could manage.

I bought a pulley removal tool in anticipation of it being stuck even after removing the crank bolt:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Am-Tech-Harmonic-Balance-Puller-Set/dp/B006B3NXA4/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1440962683&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=amtech+pulley+removal

Unfortunately i didn't realise the crank pulley bolt didn't have any threaded holes to screw into... Really frustrating. Can anyone recommend a suitable tool to remove the crank pulley on a 1.6 Sigma Engine (with a/c)?

On a different note how can i lock the timing and still be able to re-tighten the camshaft/crankshaft bolts without breaking anything. I'm a bit confused as to at which points i should insert the locking tools as i cant use them to tighten anything as they will bend/break. I have a flywheel locking tool but couldn't figure out how to get to the starter motor it seems to be hidden away under the air intake for the engine?

I think as i was trying to get the crank pulley off i lost my timing :unsure: .

I'm fairly confident i restored it by loosening the camshaft sprockets rotating each camshaft and rotating the engine so the crankshaft hits the locking pin and the camshaft locking bar can go in...This also matches a little diagram i made of the cam positions when crankshaft is at TDC. I think there may have been some valve piston contact as i was correcting the timing (tried to be as careful as possible) but i should be ok right?

Thanks

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I think you should ok Rupert. The timing is a bit confusing on this engine but to be honest your not doing too bad fella. I myself am not sure how to keep the timing locked when tightening all back up as the timeing pins probably would snap with the tension of tightening all up. I will check the etis guide later tonight and see if it gives any information on this part. Hopefully something can be helpful.

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When you loosen and tighten the cam pulleys you should hold them with a suitable tool so you dont stress or snap the camshafts.

With the crank pulley, if you have the flywheel locked properly then you can loosen and tighten the crank bolt no problem.

I'm always undecided if i should or shouldn't give advice on jobs such as timing belts because you tend to find those asking so many questions tend to be out of their depth - by the way nothing personal or that.

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When you loosen and tighten the cam pulleys you should hold them with a suitable tool so you dont stress or snap the camshafts.

With the crank pulley, if you have the flywheel locked properly then you can loosen and tighten the crank bolt no problem.

I'm always undecided if i should or shouldn't give advice on jobs such as timing belts because you tend to find those asking so many questions tend to be out of their depth - by the way nothing personal or that.

Stefan great advice there very clear and easy to understand.

I take it when the cam pulleys are held with correct tool you just tightened the cam bolts to the correct torque with your torque wrench. when this is done and you go to tightened the Crank pulley its only the matter of using the torque wrench to correctly tighten the crank pulley bolt as with the cam pulleys already tight and the flywheel locked with the tool the timing cant move? or am I way off in my thinking lol! :)

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Yeah basically you need a cam pulley holding tool (as pictured earlier in this thread I think) to counter the torque from you tightening or loosening the bolts.

Yep your on the right lines certainly.

Be aware you may need a torque wrench and an angle gauge.

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Thanks Stefan

I am planning on getting an angle gauge as well when i attempt my own timing belt. I think this thread is great as at least we know what is needed to attempt the job.

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Quite often in a tricky spot, rather than trying to use and angle gauge - if for arguement sake say the angle is 90 degrees, mark the starting position of the bolt and the bolt head after doing the initial torque setting, then mark where 90 degrees would take it, that way you are not faffing about with it.

Other than a torque wrench, angle gauge, cam pulley tool, locking kit and flywheel locking tool there isn't any fancy tools but certain tools really do help!

Again as I've already mentioned previously, if the crank bolt aint for budging (even do this anyway) then apply a bit of heat to it first and you will be suprised how much easier it moves.

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Quite often in a tricky spot, rather than trying to use and angle gauge - if for arguement sake say the angle is 90 degrees, mark the starting position of the bolt and the bolt head after doing the initial torque setting, then mark where 90 degrees would take it, that way you are not faffing about with it.

Other than a torque wrench, angle gauge, cam pulley tool, locking kit and flywheel locking tool there isn't any fancy tools but certain tools really do help!

Again as I've already mentioned previously, if the crank bolt aint for budging (even do this anyway) then apply a bit of heat to it first and you will be suprised how much easier it moves.

Great advice stefan. You seem to know your stuff on this. Thanks.

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Its back together after several rain-soaked hours struggling with super tight crankshaft bolts, pulleys, after losing the timing etc... and I'm happy to say that it seems to be running the same as it used to :) . No strange noises, vibrations, the idle seems good also...I'll keep my fingers crossed and hope that i have correctly torqued the camshaft/crankshaft bolts (i was unable to lock the crankshaft but used a holding tool on the sprockets).

Wondering if i should do a compression test to see if any of my valves got damaged during the resetting of the timing as I'm fairly sure the valves and pistons made contact while i was hand turning the engine trying to get the camshaft(s) and crankshaft back into sync...I'll post some pictures later...

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I wouldn't tighten bolts using the alignment tools you can break the cam, there's part of the cam that a spanner fits on that you're supposed to use.

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What i did in the end was leave the camshaft bolts on loose and tighten the crankshaft bolt first (with car in gear and spark plugs in and using a cam holding tool http://www.amazon.co.uk/Laser-2869-Camshaft-Holding-Tool/dp/B003AMUG4U on the crank pulley as it got tighter) to 60nm + 90degrees. I then got the crank at top dead center by rotating it clockwise until it hit the crank timing pin. I then removed the crank timing pin and rotated the cams so the cam locking bar fitted. I then held the cams with the holding tool while someone tightened them down to 60nm. After all this was finished i rotated the engine with the timing locking tools out and rechecked they fitted (about 4 times in the end to be sure).

I realise it would have been ideal to get the starter motor out and lock the crankshaft with the flywheel locking kit but i ran out of time and needed it for work (weather was a bit rubbish over the weekend and bank holiday).

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Great Job Rupert.

I'm glad you got all done and done right by the sounds of it. Keep us posted ho wit goes for you but if you used the correct torque settings on all bolts I cant see there being an issue with them.

You should be proud of yourself fella its a big job to undertake. :)

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