Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


1.4 Tdci Mpg?


lewisG95
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am getting 37.5mpg in my 2012 1.4 tdci edge which I think is rubbish and I am not driving like a Looney so could it be a mechanical problem or not or could it just be my driving ?

thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i get hugely higher, ~55mpg

is that around town, do you change gears often?

anything that leads you to believe that theres a mechanical fault other than the mpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not really I don't live in a place where the roads are full of cars so not busy at all and gears just when needed and not really I have some sort of leak but I think it is water and my flexi pipe on downpipe to the exhaust is a bit sooty so other than that nothing

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I get more than 40mpg out of my ST2. Not caning it but not slow either. Something seriously wrong with your car if you can't get 50mpg out of a diesel unless you're driving with your handbrake on, or very heavy footed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not driving that heavy footed normal driving really one thing I have noticed is that it take ages to get warm and sometimes I'm at my destination before the car gets warm.

Sent from my HTC One X using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites


The mpg doesn't sound right at all!

As for taking ages to get warm - That is quite normal for a diesel - They normally take much longer to heat up than petrols, and generally run cooler (unless driven hard).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So it's likely that you're doing lots of journeys of less than 10 miles or so. Diesels do tend to take longer to warm up due to the engine having greater mass because of the requirement for higher compression in the cylinders. As for running cooler, no, higher compression requirement for combustion leads to higher temperatures, which is then controlled by the thermostat so temps tend to be similar. I've driven diesel cars for more than 20 years, they tend to warm up within 5 miles or so, longer if you have heating on full.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what wrong with it but your right it takes ages to warm up from cold with heating on I could understand why my mpg would be lower then but I don't do journeys over 10 miles in one sitting maybe the furthest I go is 6 and then car is turned off for few hours then same 6 mile is drove so maybe it is just where I am driving it.

Sent from my HTC One X using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what wrong with it but your right it takes ages to warm up from cold with heating on I could understand why my mpg would be lower then but I don't do journeys over 10 miles in one sitting maybe the furthest I go is 6 and then car is turned off for few hours then same 6 mile is drove so maybe it is just where I am driving it.

Sent from my HTC One X using Ford OC mobile app

That's the problem, my old civic diesel only did 40 on the work run but was capable on 70 on motorways. Take it for a long drive and see what it does

Sent from my SM-N9005 using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I might just have to do that and maybe drive like my grandma so if you see a black fiesta in north east area going slow look no further :)

Sent from my HTC One X using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites


As for running cooler, no, higher compression requirement for combustion leads to higher temperatures, which is then controlled by the thermostat so temps tend to be similar.

Actually Gary, I think you'll find that diesels do in fact run comparatively cooler under 'normal' driving conditions. This is due to the efficiency of the fuel burn (hence why diesels return better mpg figures). Combustion of the fuel/air mix will generate energy - this will translate into mechanical energy (torque in this case) or thermal energy (heat!). Diesel engines are generally much better at turning the combustion process into mechanical energy (hence why diesel engines produce high torque outputs).

Diesel engines also tend to 'work better' at the lower rpm range, so in normal driving conditions a diesel engine would be working in a lower rpm range than a petrol engine - Again, assisting in fuel economy, and again resulting in comparatively lower heat generation.

Once either engine is up to heat, that is when engine cooling will kick in to keep the engine at the optimal operating temperature, and at working temperature both diesel and petrol will maintain similar constant temperatures, BUT the cooling system on the petrol engine will generally be transferring out more thermal energy than the cooling system on the diesel engine! (At higher ambient temperatures the cooling fan on a diesel will kick in less than the cooling fan on a petrol engine).

All of the above assumes some sort of 'normal driving'. On the flip side, a hard-driven diesel engine will easily generate as much, if not more, thermal energy as a had-driven petrol engine.

Hope that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't do journeys over 10 miles in one sitting maybe the furthest I go is 6 and then car is turned off for few hours then same 6 mile is drove

There's your problem. A diesel is a motorway machine and gives it's best mpg on long runs. Sounds like you should have bought a petrol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's your problem. A diesel is a motorway machine and gives it's best mpg on long runs. Sounds like you should have bought a petrol.

I would have to agree with this - short journeys in a diesel will not produce great mpg returns.

Also, just a thought, I assume the 2012 1.4 TDCi has a DPF fitted? Does anyone know? If it does, you might want to google dpf issues and possibly consider changing to a petrol sooner rather than later! (unless you are going to do some regular longer runs)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dpf issues easily sorted by giving it a hard time and blasting it about. Much like a cat they clean themselves at 7000rpm and 800c ( and by licking themselves )

Sent from my SM-N9005 using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the motor industry has done a great job selling diesels to the masses. Diesels are great in certain situations and for certain tax reasons, but Fiat's Twin Air and Fords EcoBoost petrols have ended the diesel's day in the domestic market. But as I say, Ford, Vauxhall, Peugeut and all have coined it handsomely, selling the bigger capacity diesel for a lot more money in the showroom but passing off the particulate filter headaches, the extra weight, NVH and fuel costs as 'cost savers'.

The Which? report reckons you've got to be doing 20000+ miles a year simply to break even with the quieter, smoother, lighter petrol engined equivalent. You planning on doing that Lewis?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the motor industry has done a great job selling diesels to the masses. Diesels are great in certain situations and for certain tax reasons, but Fiat's Twin Air and Fords EcoBoost petrols have ended the diesel's day in the domestic market. But as I say, Ford, Vauxhall, Peugeut and all have coined it handsomely, selling the bigger capacity diesel for a lot more money in the showroom but passing off the particulate filter headaches, the extra weight, NVH and fuel costs as 'cost savers'.

The Which? report reckons you've got to be doing 20000+ miles a year simply to break even with the quieter, smoother, lighter petrol engined equivalent. You planning on doing that Lewis?

Please back that up with some math. Real math and not a copy and paste from Google.

Sent from my SM-N9005 using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please back that up with some math. Real math and not a copy and paste from Google.

Sent from my SM-N9005 using Ford OC mobile app

Probably was talking about something like this? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/9407960/The-hidden-cost-of-diesel-cars.html

Sent from my HUAWEI Ascend P2 using Ford OC mobile app

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am only on my phone a the moment so cannot do some proper looking but in the article they compare 2 different engines in the same car but do the engines have similar performance. Maybe it might be better to compere similar sized engines which give comparable performance.

Sent from my iPhone using Ford OC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the Telegraph link Matt, I'd not seen that.

Zeglover, they compare two different engines in the same car because the diesel invariably produces less bhp (even with a turbocharger) than the same sized petrol. It produces lots more torque though... and lots more particulates.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership