Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


hope batterys right.


michaelburrows
 Share

Recommended Posts

battery failed on my 62 plate tdci so aftwr shoppi g around decided on Halfords for a yuasa battery with 5 yr warranty.  its an hsb110 model  85 ah  800 cca.   the original was 80 ah and 700 cca.     it was fitted by Halfords and a right old job the lad had. also it was not the battery recommended by their website when u enter ure number plate. that was only 74ah 680 cca.   but guy said id chosen wrong battery and was not powerfull enough.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites


If it fits in the space and the terminals are in the correct corners then it does not matter if AH and CCA are higher than before. Higher does no harm.

A lot of cars can cope with lower AH and CCA then on the original batteries. depends partly on electrical load and climate.

So if Ford UK supply a car that might be used in the Scottish highlands but is in fact used on the South coast of England then it probably does not need the same CCA.  The CCA is the ability of the battery to supply the neccessary huge amount of power to turn the starter motor when cold. The chemical reactions in a battery work less well when cold so that impedes performance. Also the oil in car's engine is thicker (impeding the engine turning) when cold. Also the same with the gearbox oil, and unless you put your foot on the clutch when starting, the gearbox oil puts a bit of a drag on the engine turning also. Also diesels need more CCA than petrol as they are higher compression engines, so need more electrical power to turn to start. So in arctic conditions CCA comes into play more.

lower AH could come into play if you do a lot of short journeys stuck in traffic with everything electrical on (heated screen, fan, heated rear windows, all of the lights) so the battery does not have the same storage capacity waiting for the next long run to charge it right up to 100%. So if you use more AH in a journey than power put back into it by the alternator a lower AH will mean you run out of electrical power sooner.  Also this can come into play if a car is left for long periods with alarm systems using the power up. 

If you live in the warmer parts of the UK and do long journeys eg. motorways and not stuck in traffic then lower CCA and lower AH might not be noticed. I know you have bought the battery now, but some others about to buy a battery might find this of use.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had this prob on my 2008 tdci 1.6 battery was new last year when I got car started all day ever day until winter came in as soon as the warning light came on for the cold car would not turn over just click,so I nicked my mates battery which turned out a lot bigger, and  the one I had on my car so now when the red warning light comes on car starts 1st turn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

are we talking about glowplug light?   I forgot to mention that in my earlier post about CCA being more important on Diesels due to higher compression, I should have also said because additionally the glowplugs use a lot of power also at the same time as the starter motor needs lots of power.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership