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I have just fitted a set of genuine Ford 17" alloys onto my 2013 1.0 Ecoboost Fiesta which originally had 15" alloys, the wheels look fantastic, however I instantly could hear much more road noise especially from the rear axle, I appreciate the 17" have lower profile tyres, they don't catch on the arch and there's no problem on full turn but I am concerned that my new alloys don't fit my car. Can anyone please advise me if the rubbling noise is something to be concerned over.

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Hi, 

They look great and there's nothing atall to worry about; 

Two factors which need addressing here and only one is essential, 

It is essential that you take the car to your local tyre shop and have the tracking alignment done, this can cost anything up to 50 pounds and is generally done by appointment, it's purpose is to ensure the full surface of the tyre is in contact with the surface of the road, 

This will also save you money on replacing tyres; because if it's not tracked correctly as is current state since changing to bigger wheels; then the inside area of your rear wheels will wear down faster than the rest of the wheel surface which is clearly uneven wear and premature expiration of the tyre, 

The second factor is; it needs to be lowered as the existing arch gap is huge and reducing your street credit massively; I suggest fitting a set of ford approved Eibach lowering springs which will reduce the ride height by 25mm and look way better aswell as making the drive more stable, predicate and fun also won't scrape on ramps, I say ford approved as ford can provide and fit there sold by ford aswell as eBay but there cheapest on fordpartsuk.com or eBay. 

Here's pumaspeed but shop around, aslong as you choose the Eibach kit for your model year and engine then it's all the same kit. Link: https://pumaspeed.co.uk/product-Focus-Ecoboost-Eibach-Pro-Kit-Lowering-Springs-Pre-Facelift_16604.jsp 

Different set for petrol and diesel models as diesel are heavier, 

If lowering you will need to get tracking alignment done afterwards; so if planning to lower within the next three to four months then I would hold off on the tracking alignment until two weeks after lowering; otherwise you will need to do it twice, 

And I say two weeks after lowering; because after lowering; it takes time for the springs to bed in correctly, 

My focus is lowered six years now on Eibach lowering springs and it's still going great and alot of fun.

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I recommend Avon Zv5 great grip and low noise also check pressure and consider tyre pressure sensors as low profile tyres have reinforced side walls; you could have a flat but not see it until the tyre is shredded down the road. 

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Hi

Mine has got Continental PremiumContact 5/6 on the front and the same but 2s on the back. There is a little bit of noise coming from them but no more than my dads car which is a Dodge Caliber with 215/60 r17? with the same make of tyre on it.

Just one word of warning with the 17" rims STAY AWAY FROM KERBS AT ALL COSTS!!!!! Even if you look at a kerb you will hit it and mark the wheels, I know this from experience!!!!

Hope this helps

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22 hours ago, BigLen said:

Hi, 

They look great and there's nothing atall to worry about; 

Two factors which need addressing here and only one is essential, 

It is essential that you take the car to your local tyre shop and have the tracking alignment done, this can cost anything up to 50 pounds and is generally done by appointment, it's purpose is to ensure the full surface of the tyre is in contact with the surface of the road, 

This will also save you money on replacing tyres; because if it's not tracked correctly as is current state since changing to bigger wheels; then the inside area of your rear wheels will wear down faster than the rest of the wheel surface which is clearly uneven wear and premature expiration of the tyre, 

The second factor is; it needs to be lowered as the existing arch gap is huge and reducing your street credit massively; I suggest fitting a set of ford approved eibach lowering springs which will reduce the ride height by 25mm and look way better aswell as making the drive more stable, predicate and fun also won't scrape on ramps, I say ford approved as ford can provide and fit there sold by ford aswell as eBay but there cheapest on fordpartsuk.com or eBay. 

Here's pumaspeed but shop around, aslong as you choose the eibach kit for your model year and engine then it's all the same kit. Link: https://pumaspeed.co.uk/product-Focus-Ecoboost-Eibach-Pro-Kit-Lowering-Springs-Pre-Facelift_16604.jsp 

Different set for petrol and diesel models as diesel are heavier, 

If lowering you will need to get tracking alignment done afterwards; so if planning to lower within the next three to four months then I would hold off on the tracking alignment until two weeks after lowering; otherwise you will need to do it twice, 

And I say two weeks after lowering; because after lowering; it takes time for the springs to bed in correctly, 

My focus is lowered six years now on eibach lowering springs and it's still going great and alot of fun.

Why would new wheels affect the tracking?

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21 hours ago, FiestaForever said:

Silly question but do you have the spigot rings inside the alloy centre section. This could also throw the wheels out of balance.

Genuine alloys wouldn’t  need spigot rings, the centre bore is the same.

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1 hour ago, MarksST said:

Genuine alloys wouldn’t  need spigot rings, the centre bore is the same.

I was unaware that genuine ford alloys didn't need spigot's. I have never owned a set to be fair always had aftermarket jobbies. 

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1 hour ago, MarksST said:

Why would new wheels affect the tracking?

From experience fitting bigger wheels which are generally also wider than smaller rims, causes the centre of the wheel in contact with the road to be put out; causing increased wear on the inner surface compared to the rest of the tyre surface, as result alignment is required for optimum tyre wear. 

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The tyres aren't just low profile, they're also XL (extra load) which means much firmer sidewalls which also causes noise.  As long as there's no actual rubbing on the arches then it's not a fault.

On a slightly different note, you should fit steering rack limiters when fitting 17s, otherwise you may find the front wheels catch on full lock.  Some people never use full lock so don't bother, others have to drive multi-storey car parks every day so need them.

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30 minutes ago, TomsFocus said:

The tyres aren't just low profile, they're also XL (extra load) which means much firmer sidewalls which also causes noise.  As long as there's no actual rubbing on the arches then it's not a fault.

On a slightly different note, you should fit steering rack limiters when fitting 17s, otherwise you may find the front wheels catch on full lock.  Some people never use full lock so don't bother, others have to drive multi-storey car parks every day so need them.

I agree with your comment on steering rack limiters👍

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