Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Recommended Posts

I am unexpectedly trading in my 2016 Zetec S tomorrow and I foolishly put a full tank of petrol in last week that I’ve barely used. Is there an easy, safe and inexpensive way to get some of it out? Ideally something that doesn’t cost as much as the £30 of petrol.

I know I’m probably being mean-spirited but it just grates a bit.

thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually you siphon the fuel out using the filler neck. Unfortunately for you, Ford fit anti-siphon devices (1 way valves) to the filler pipe so theives don't just steal it.

Easiest way is to pump it out by disconnecting the feed in the engine bay.

Seems a lot of hassle for £30 worth of fuel, plus you have to get some containers to store it...

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Luke4efc said:

Usually you siphon the fuel out using the filler neck. Unfortunately for you, Ford fit anti-siphon devices (1 way valves) to the filler pipe so theives don't just steal it.

Easiest way is to pump it out by disconnecting the feed in the engine bay.

Seems a lot of hassle for £30 worth of fuel, plus you have to get some containers to store it...

Well I’m happy Ford have put in the anti-siphon technology to be fair. I agree, not worth the hassle. At least somebody gets to enjoy a free tank of fuel.

Thanks

Caltor

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TomsFocus said:

£30 for a tank of petrol?  Which year are you in? :biggrin:

Well rounding slightly but I paid £35.01 for 29.2L at £1.199/L. I don’t think the Fiesta has a particularly big tank but it seems quite economical.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just now, Caltor said:

Well rounding slightly but I paid £35.01 for 29.2L at £1.199/L. I don’t think the Fiesta has a particularly big tank but it seems quite economical.

Ah fair enough, tank is 42 litres so you only put 3/4s in tbf.  

Best option is to take the long route to the dealership tomorrow to use as much as you can!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TomsFocus said:

Ah fair enough, tank is 42 litres so you only put 3/4s in tbf.  

Best option is to take the long route to the dealership tomorrow to use as much as you can!

Yeah that sounds about right. I tend to fill up fairly early as I’m paranoid about running out of fuel and I seem to remember once being told you shouldn’t run too close to empty to avoid all the gunge at the bottom of the tank getting into the system but that’s probably just an urban myth. (prepares for thread to take a very different turn...) Keeping at least half a tank is also one of the recommended ways to be prepared for a disaster. With all the flooding and snow in Britain at the moment, it’s probably quite wise.

Haha “unfortunately” Cazoo are picking it up from my house when they drop off my new one. Maybe I could do my weekly shopping one item per trip tomorrow... 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always run mine into the red and then brim it...  Looking at £60+ of diesel! 😬

Lol, yeah that does make it a bit awkward then! :laugh:

You'll have to let us know how you get on with Cazoo.  I was tempted to try them myself!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/25/2021 at 7:52 PM, TomsFocus said:

I always run mine into the red and then brim it...  Looking at £60+ of diesel! 😬

Lol, yeah that does make it a bit awkward then! :laugh:

You'll have to let us know how you get on with Cazoo.  I was tempted to try them myself!

 

diesel and petrol are slightly different when it comes to best practices of filling up, ideally with a petrol you shouldn't regulary run the car past 1/4 full due to the pump using the fuel to help cool it and petrol tanks suffer more from rust than diesel tanks and also diesel cars have their fuel filter in the engine bay 99% off the time where as (at least with ford, the filter is in the tank just above the pump, so you have to drop the tank to replace it

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Neb_engineer said:

diesel and petrol are slightly different when it comes to best practices of filling up, ideally with a petrol you shouldn't regulary run the car past 1/4 full due to the pump using the fuel to help cool it and petrol tanks suffer more from rust than diesel tanks and also diesel cars have their fuel filter in the engine bay 99% off the time where as (at least with ford, the filter is in the tank just above the pump, so you have to drop the tank to replace it

I haven't seen a metal petrol tank for 20 years, modern tanks are plastic, they don't rust. :smile: 

When I used to break cars, I always got as much fuel out of the tank as possible, either quickly cutting the filler elbow off, or going in through the lift pump hole if I wanted to save the tank.  I never saw any 'muck' at the bottom of a tank of either petrol or diesel.  It's another of those classic problems that doesn't apply to modern cars.

The only one I did have a problem with was a diesel that had been run on WVO...unfiltered WVO! :rolleyes:  Pick-up housing was full of batter scraps! :ermm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, TomsFocus said:

I haven't seen a metal petrol tank for 20 years, modern tanks are plastic, they don't rust. :smile: 

When I used to break cars, I always got as much fuel out of the tank as possible, either quickly cutting the filler elbow off, or going in through the lift pump hole if I wanted to save the tank.  I never saw any 'muck' at the bottom of a tank of either petrol or diesel.  It's another of those classic problems that doesn't apply to modern cars.

The only one I did have a problem with was a diesel that had been run on WVO...unfiltered WVO! :rolleyes:  Pick-up housing was full of batter scraps! :ermm:

The rust part of my response was more a general thing not specific to that car as most cars on the road are old enough still to have metal tanks, but in most cars the fuel pump is located in the tank along with the filter (for petrols) and so the pump needs some quantity of fuel left to be used to cool itself, otherwise you effectively reduce the lifespan of your fuel pump and replaceing them is not fun if you only have a jack and axle stands

Link to post
Share on other sites

Which cars do you still regularly see on the road with metal tanks?  Fire safety regs meant they were all plastic from around the turn of the century.  

Most early common rail and PD diesels used in-tank fuel pumps too btw...it's only Ford that wanted to be awkward and get people hand priming after a filter change! :laugh:  Sadly Peugeot let them continue that with the DV joint venture. :rolleyes: 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TomsFocus said:

Which cars do you still regularly see on the road with metal tanks?  Fire safety regs meant they were all plastic from around the turn of the century.  

Most early common rail and PD diesels used in-tank fuel pumps too btw...it's only Ford that wanted to be awkward and get people hand priming after a filter change! :laugh:  Sadly Peugeot let them continue that with the DV joint venture. :rolleyes: 

My works 7.5T Mitsi vans have metal tanks - at 1 year old most of the powdercoating has come off and they're covered in rust 😞

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, robbyvrs said:

My works 7.5T Mitsi vans have metal tanks - at 1 year old most of the powdercoating has come off and they're covered in rust 😞

That doesn't sound like a car... :tongue:

I do wonder why they're still using metal though!

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomsFocus said:

That doesn't sound like a car... :tongue:

I do wonder why they're still using metal though!

I would have expected the metal tank to at least be galvanised? the cheap powdercoat (or maybe just paint?) has almost totally worn off in a year, not sure how long before rust holes appear? The bigger trucks + HGVs we have do have plastic tanks or what i think is stainless steel (oo - shiney)

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, robbyvrs said:

I would have expected the metal tank to at least be galvanised? the cheap powdercoat (or maybe just paint?) has almost totally worn off in a year, not sure how long before rust holes appear? The bigger trucks + HGVs we have do have plastic tanks or what i think is stainless steel (oo - shiney)

Fuel tanks can't be galvanised, the zinc reacts with the fuel and creates a chalky substance that would clog the fuel system.  Stainless steel is a much better option (and looks nicer! :biggrin: ).  Though it's much more expensive than plastic, so probably used for tanks so large that plastic wouldn't be robust enough? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership