audrius_uk

Engine oil change

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Hi,

Im new here and do not know anything about cars...please help me. I just bought 2010 Fiesta 1.4 TDCi and checked engine oil which looks like not enough and completely black (see picture below). So I decided to drive in come cheap service in Dewsbury and change it. But in my surprise, after change oil and filter yesterday I checked it on cold engine and looks like now its too much oil and its same black color. (See video). Is this must be in this way?

Picture before:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1bwMZ4io_17SPzGYoM-ibrhCXNhEeMBJ0

Video after:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/10-Ptw6btjsKTf0kzUlHQJYIwbQO7M8u1/view?usp=sharing

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13 hours ago, audrius_uk said:

So I decided to drive in come cheap service in Dewsbury and change it. But in my surprise, after change oil and filter yesterday I checked it on cold engine and looks like now its too much oil and its same black color.

Putting in too much oil after a change is very, very common. The handbook figure assumes the engine is empty, but a simple oil drain will never entirely empty the engine. So if the book amount is chucked in, it will be too much. And it is a slow job to put it in a bit at a time, checking each fill. Just last month I changed my oil, I took two days to fill to about 1/2 way up the dipstick, letting it settle between checks. A garage will never do this. Too much oil reduces fuel economy and clogs up the inlet manifold and EGR valve as the excess oil is blown out through the crankcase ventilation system. But garages do not generally care one iota about this. More servicing work for them in the long run! I know my engine uses very little, so half full is fine for it.

I have sucked out a jar of oil using a hand held vacuum pump on one occasion after a change.

A diesel has naturally rather black oil, and even a small amount of the old oil remaining (inevitable) will darken the new oil. If you wipe the dipstick on a tissue, and the oil stain looks totally black, then it needs changing (again), But if it is translucent or greyish in a thin layer, that is about normal. If in any doubt, change it again, oil changes are good for engines, and much, much cheaper then new engines or replacement turbos.

 

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Diesel oil will hold soot particles in suspension in it, which it is designed to do but does make it go black really quickly after an oil change.

The best way to get as much old oil as possible is with a vacuum pump and a flushing oil.

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I don't think the level is so high that you need to worry. Just leave it. And I agree that in a diesel the oil looks black after a change due to the residue of very black oil left in the sump that mixes with the new oil.    On some diesels I have seen it said that using flushing oil can dislodge a load of crud that can block the oil feed pipe to the turbo and hence ruin the turbo (Ford 1.6tdci from around 2005-2010 particularly but i don't know if there is a risk in other engines)

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