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House Humidifier advice.


jace1969
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We live upstairs as I look after my dad but I got a Temp/Humidifier reader and it says only 35 to 40% (lucky to get 40%) which means the air is hot and humid.

Put into consideration my elderly dad like to be warm as most do when there older but I have tried to help with them radiator hanging things

s/steel which you fill up with water but been on for 3 days and not a lot gone if any,the reading/tester aint the best in the world but I have 2 and both the same.

I need to combine the both if I can,warm for dad but not stuffy where its so humid,tried the 2 testers I have in a

damper/cooler spare room and goes to min of 55%

which is what they recommend between the 2 setting (50 to 65% area) is a cheap electric one do better,

there about £20 off amazon and I know you wont get it smack on

but would like it better than 35%,i know humid air will always be hot but just looking at things to help as sometimes a dry cough.

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Wouldn't salt work as a dehumidifier?

I have no advice on adding humidity though, not a problem I've ever had.  My Nan used to have a humidifier to help with ailments though, puffed out cool steam at regular intervals...next to a dehumidifier because the room was getting mouldy. She couldn't understand the futility of the 2 together. :lol:

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Jason states that the air is 'hot and humid' If his readings are correct, which I have no doubt they are, then the air is in fact 'hot and dry' :wink:

 

Ideal home humidity is between 40 and 60% so humidity needs to be added. 

 

A quick Google will show ways on how to add humidity to your house.......

 

https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=adding+humidity+to+a+room

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2 hours ago, Turvey said:

Jason states that the air is 'hot and humid' If his readings are correct, which I have no doubt they are, then the air is in fact 'hot and dry' :wink:

 

Ideal home humidity is between 40 and 60% so humidity needs to be added. 

 

A quick Google will show ways on how to add humidity to your house.......

 

https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=adding+humidity+to+a+room

Lol yes i was confused at first but yes true,air is hot and humid meaning no water so not damp but dry ''hence'' dry cough/throat.

I think??? what i read.

The reading is taken off 2 different items and both are close to 35% or 39% which they state around 50% or to 65%

Put reader into damp room with washing in drying and went up from the 35% to 65% but not a good way to go,Damp room.

Them puff machines i was looking at the cheaper one but just seeing if anyone tried or got one and it does work even a bit.

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Need to try and sort some sort of plug in or battery thing as these ones off amazon are a complete waiste of time.

No water comes out of them and radiator is so hot you cant touch it which defeats the object as VERY hot to get them

to work so even more Hot and Dry,an electric one or similar is the only way but i want a good size water container as it will

be gone in a few hours,if you can see it work over a few days its fine but 4 days and still same level,these are them on the link.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Stainless-Steel-Radiator-Humidifier-Box-2/dp/B00AO5R16M/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1454822268&sr=8-8&keywords=radiator+humidifier

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Wow I wish I could be in your shoes lol. Never heard of a too "dry" house in England, at least until now. I have the opposite problem - I bought a massive dehumidifier (compressor-based system). When I moved into my flat - it was around 70%-74% humidity. It's a bit noisy (feel like I'm inside a jumbo jet on a long haul flight sometimes) and it sucks up electricity, but its still highly worth it.

The recommended range for humidity in a house is 40-60%. Ideal conditions for mould growth start at 65% R.H, so never exceed this value if possible.

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7 hours ago, Incontro said:

Wow I wish I could be in your shoes lol. Never heard of a too "dry" house in England, at least until now. I have the opposite problem - I bought a massive dehumidifier (compressor-based system). When I moved into my flat - it was around 70%-74% humidity. It's a bit noisy (feel like I'm inside a jumbo jet on a long haul flight sometimes) and it sucks up electricity, but its still highly worth it.

The recommended range for humidity in a house is 40-60%. Ideal conditions for mould growth start at 65% R.H, so never exceed this value if possible.

Yes that the reading i got off the internet,see my dad is 87 and he loves his heat so the room is hot and when i looked at the reading most time

it says 35 to 40%so just trying to get it around the 50% mark so just seeing what little machines are out there to try,radiator things are no good.

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Before you starting spending your pennies, a trick I was taught by a ski instructor (when he saw there was a little blood when I blew my nose) is to put a bowl of water on or by a radiator, that way it will MAKE humidity, warm and moist air...

Reason for blood was the air on the mountain was very dry! So I reckon you should give that a go...

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I didn't know that, I get a lot of nose-bleeds in summer that I can't explain, could be the reason...

He has tried something similar though, metal bowls that hang off the radiator, in the first post. :)

Incontro - I know what you mean, my room in the parents house was so damp (70%+) it'd be thick with mould every couple of weeks in winter, hated it!  It was made worse by fitting new windows which sealed the house lol.  In the 'new' flat I haven't had any mould issues all winter, humidity is always around 50%, and I dry clothes in here a couple of times a week as well.  The use of extractor fans helps I think, plus there are small vents at the top of the windows that allow airflow.

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I have tried the radiator ones as i have put a link to them off amazon but there no good.

I had a pair of them and never gets hot and water don't go down after 4 days so this is the reason for the electric one.

I was thinking the radiator ones should work good being against the Rad and not under it as the heat rises.

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5 hours ago, TomsFocus said:

bit of topicI didn't know that, I get a lot of nose-bleeds in summer that I can't explain, could be the reason...

He has tried something similar though, metal bowls that hang off the radiator, in the first post. :)

Incontro - I know what you mean, my room in the parents house was so damp (70%+) it'd be thick with mould every couple of weeks in winter, hated it!  It was made worse by fitting new windows which sealed the house lol.  In the 'new' flat I haven't had any mould issues all winter, humidity is always around 50%, and I dry clothes in here a couple of times a week as well.  The use of extractor fans helps I think, plus there are small vents at the top of the windows that allow airflow.

bit off topic suffered nose bleeds all my life especially in hot weather funny old world anit

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