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#16 Stoney871

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 12:17 AM

The IAM course is similar to the Police driving courses.
It's about anticipation and observation.
An example could be you're driving along a city street and you see a car parked at the kerb- is it occupied? Therefore is it going to pull out? What type of vehicle is it? Do the doors slide or swing normally? If they swing is somebody going to open them on you? If they slide will someone step out of the vehicle unexpectedly?
You read the road, expect the unexpected, and plan accordingly.
It's like a very involved, daily hazard perception test.
You learn to drive smoothly and confidently in all conditions and in a considerate and safe manner.
It also means I pay 250 insurance with 50 excess. Not bad in my view.

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#17 Rh1no

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 01:57 AM

That's the kind of thing I fancy, you done that aswell as your ticket at work?

#18 Stoney871

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 02:59 AM

I have a IAM qualification and I'm pursuit trained for my job.
It means I can do pursuit and rapid response duties as the tasking requires.
Loads of courses but well worth them.

#19 Rh1no

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 12:23 AM

You obtained the IAM aside from work or as part of the training mate?

#20 Stoney871

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 04:24 AM

I did IAM off my own back but had 50% reimbursed to me.
The training is very useful IMO.

#21 jeebowhite

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 02:02 PM

by the sounds of it I already drive to IAM standards, some call it paranoid, but I definately call it reading the roads...

I argued with my exam centre when I passed my test, they marked me down because I identified "too many hazards" or "clicked too many times" they couldnt really tell which, so I went through each test with them and talked them through the entire clip and explained each click I made, and why I made it. needless to say, my marks went up to 95% pass on the hazard perception because even though I passed, I still wanted all my points! :P

Thats the only thing I hate about the driving test, leaving a computer in charge of dictating logic!

#22 Stoney871

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 02:05 PM

Everything on the road is a potential hazard so that test is pretty pointless tbh.


#23 raskL

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 03:50 PM

I did IAM off my own back but had 50% reimbursed to me.
The training is very useful IMO.


yeah ive done iam also, as you say its all about anticipation and stuff some driving techniques like lowering gears and things for slowing down rather than driving 3 inches from the back of a white van that you cant see through :D how many times have you seen that ?.

to orignal question : i think its worth it , and helps on the old premiums too

#24 jeebowhite

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 12:29 PM

I go by the theory its cheaper to replace brake pads than to slip the clutch, and since you slip every time you change... I use the gears if I am ever going fast enough and need to bring the speed down because I dont want to slam the brakes on, but for day to day, letting the foot off the gas, and just dabbing the brakes - works a treat for me...

Now, I am probably going to be invited to never join the IAM to do that test.... :P

#25 johnS

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 01:06 AM

I go by the theory its cheaper to replace brake pads than to slip the clutch, and since you slip every time you change... I use the gears if I am ever going fast enough and need to bring the speed down because I dont want to slam the brakes on, but for day to day, letting the foot off the gas, and just dabbing the brakes - works a treat for me...

Now, I am probably going to be invited to never join the IAM to do that test.... :P


rev match and you wont be slipping the clutch.

I beleive they also teach that on the advanced driving test?

#26 Stoney871

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Posted 22 July 2012 - 02:06 AM

I double declutch and left foot brake, courtesy of my advanced driver course (Cheers D&C)

#27 jeebowhite

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 12:45 PM

Rev Match? Unless I know it by some other name, I havent heard of "rev match". I presume its a case of drop clutch at 3,000 revs, then accelerate to 3,000 revs in neutral ready for dropping the clutch in?

perhaps the IAM course might be good to teach me the lingo :P I know most stuff with a less technical name :P

#28 johnS

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 10:37 PM

Rev Match? Unless I know it by some other name, I havent heard of "rev match". I presume its a case of drop clutch at 3,000 revs, then accelerate to 3,000 revs in neutral ready for dropping the clutch in?

perhaps the IAM course might be good to teach me the lingo :P I know most stuff with a less technical name :P


yes it stops the car jerking forward (like braking) when releasing the clutch when downshifting this also stops the clutch wearing

#29 Stoney871

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 10:50 PM

Same principle as used when riding a motorcycle, you pop the revs to avoid flying over the bars.

#30 johnS

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Posted 23 July 2012 - 11:16 PM

Same principle as used when riding a motorcycle, you pop the revs to avoid flying over the bars.


Didnt even know they had to do that on motorbikes. I suppose it makes sense, guess you learn something new everyday!

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