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Focus Mk2 Cam Belt


barrymx5
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Is there a DIYer out there who has successfully replaced a cam belt on a Mk2 55 plate diesel Focus or similar. The Haynes manual describes the need to remove the cylinder head cover and camshaft sprocket. Common sense tells me not to disturb anything at all, unless absolutely necessary. The car is perfectly timed as it stands, and I'm after simple stages to change the timing belt and tensioner, with minimum fuss.

If I'm told that it is more complex than I think, then I'll pass it onto a garage expert.

My problem is that I'm retired, and I like to dabble with most DIY tasks. I've done lots of mechanical work to cars in the past, but I'm not going to risk damage to the engine if there's no simple solution that doesn't require special tools and training.

I've gone as far as removing the timing belt outer cover, and there's a voice telling me to have a go. However, all the threads suggest differently and I'm going on their advice for the time being.

It's unfortunate that YouTube doesn't appear to cover this particular task on my car, and as said, the Haynes manual seems rather complex.

I'll save someone the bother of telling me to just 'get it to a garage', which is the most likely outcome, unless there's a DIY genius out there who can tell me otherwise.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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Honestly given how easy its been for people to get it wrong or mess it up take it to a garage and ask for a full kit to be fitted belt and tensioner...... you need cam locking tools to do it I've known a few diyers to do it and end up smashing valves at least if a garage does it its under warranty to get to it you'll need to either remove the wheel arch liner on the drivers side or undo the engine mount drivers side and use a hydraulic jack to tilt the engine to get proper access to the bolts for the tensioner then the correct torque settings for the cam bolt which should be replaced with a new one and the tensioner bolt

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Thanks for the reply. Just to get the timing belt cover off, I've had to support the engine and remove the left engine support bracket.

I've already changed the auxiliary belt without problem. I suppose I've watched too many YouTube demos, when they just use a 6mm drill to lock the timing, and mark the various positions with tippex. However, I respect what you're saying and unless I'm convinced to do otherwise, I'll leave well alone. I'm probably hoping for someone to say that they had done it and it was a piece of cake. Wishful thinking maybe!

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Thanks for the reply. Just to get the timing belt cover off, I've had to support the engine and remove the left engine support bracket.

I've already changed the auxiliary belt without problem. I suppose I've watched too many YouTube demos, when they just use a 6mm drill to lock the timing, and mark the various positions with tippex. However, I respect what you're saying and unless I'm convinced to do otherwise, I'll leave well alone. I'm probably hoping for someone to say that they had done it and it was a piece of cake. Wishful thinking maybe!

Hi barrymx5
Im planning on doing my cam belt on my mk2.5 in a few months time. I will also be doing my father inlaws on his C-Max (same engine) and my brothers on his Focus (same engine again lol) as well. I decided to gather all the proper tools required and take time to study the steps required as in my for me I like to learn the proper way to do things lol! :)
you will need the locking tools as its best to reset the timing and lock it anyway just in case the old belt has stretched or anything due to wear. I always did reset the timing marks on any car in the past when I replaced the belt or timing chain on as I think this is better practice than using the old tipex/paint method but that's just my opinion.(start as you mean to go on lol!) :)
It should take a maybe a few hours but to do it right but my advice is if your confident in your own work then go for it if not then leave it into a garage. I personally like to try thing and if all goes wrong then I will learn from it lol! But if you take your time and follow steps carefully I don't see any issues but again it depends on how you feel working at engines ect. Plus you learn a lot in the process as well. At least like mentioned of you leave it to a garage it will be covered with some kind of warranty but I never leave any car in as I have always done my own work for many years and will try to keep that up even if it means learning new stuff lol! :)
if you are going to try it, get all the tools before hand and my advice as mentioned is get a full timing kit from ford and use new bolts where necessary. also inspect the water pump when there and replace it at this point of needed. as they say and you probably know nothing is easy but there would be no challenge if it was lol :)
Good luck anyhow
wish you all the best.
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Wow! I can't believe the prompt replies to my post, I'm well chuffed. I only wish Sonic and myself were related and he could add my job to his list lol! I'll try to find out the specialist tools I'll need for the job, and learn a bit more about adjusting the timing. Meanwhile, I'll phone around for quotes lol!

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Wow! I can't believe the prompt replies to my post, I'm well chuffed. I only wish Sonic and myself were related and he could add my job to his list lol! I'll try to find out the specialist tools I'll need for the job, and learn a bit more about adjusting the timing. Meanwhile, I'll phone around for quotes lol!

Goodman that's the spirit and if I was related I would do it for you no bother lol!

Maybe leave to a garage this time if the quotes are decent and in meantime you good learn a bit about it and gather the tools so next time you could give it a go.

Hope all goes well for you anyhows fella.

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I've just done mine on a mk2.5 1.6 tdci an the hardest part is stripping out to get to it an to be honest that isn't hard , I've never done it b4 an just followed the manual an common sense , whilst at it change the water pump

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Looking at the 54 to 09 Haynes manual, the 1.6 and 1.8 are quite different. It actually looks a lot easier to change the belt on the 1.8 as you don't need to remove the auxiliary belt and other bits to get at the timing belt. I guess it's all about working to the book and using lots of common sense. Do you have any tips on attaching an image to a post?

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I've just done mine on a mk2.5 1.6 tdci an the hardest part is stripping out to get to it an to be honest that isn't hard , I've never done it b4 an just followed the manual an common sense , whilst at it change the water pump

Just on a note did you use a torque wrench to torque up the cam and any exsisting bolts on the rebuild?

I my self usually have just tightened things up in the past but thinking of doing it by the book this time round trying to get rid of old habbits lol! What manual did you follow, just the Haynes one?

Barrymx5 in regards to a image if you upload it to your gallery in settings you will be fit to access in to add to the post. That's how add them but someone here might be more computer savy and know a easy option.

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1.8 has got either 2 belts or 1 belt and 1 chain depending on age of vehicle, cant remember the cut off point from chain to belt, if I were you leave to garage to do,

most people make the mistake of not knowing there are 2 belts, or belt and chain on the 1.8, and just change the easy belt when both need doing at the same time.

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Just on a note did you use a torque wrench to torque up the cam and any exsisting bolts on the rebuild?

I my self usually have just tightened things up in the past but thinking of doing it by the book this time round trying to get rid of old habbits lol! What manual did you follow, just the Haynes one?

Barrymx5 in regards to a image if you upload it to your gallery in settings you will be fit to access in to add to the post. That's how add them but someone here might be more computer savy and know a easy option.

No I just did them up tight an i used the Haynes Manual , I was quoted over 300 quid to have it done an the parts cost me about 120 so a nice little saving

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Hi Ian, I've bought the cam belt kit from carparts4less. You give your car reg and they supply the correct product for your car, which is only one belt and an idler. I've had the cover off the timing belt, so I can say with some certainty that my 1.8 durotorq diesel engine has the one belt. It may well have a chain elsewhere, but my understanding is that this seldom needs changing unless the car has a particularly high mileage. The 1.6 is a different beast altogether, and looking at the Haynes manual, it seems far more difficult to deal with.

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You wont see the the other belt or chain by just removing the timing belt cover, its further in, , the replacement intervals are 125k or 10 years for both, ive got to admit ive never seen the chain go after these intervals but have seen the inner belts go , with disaterous consequences.

im just making you aware that they both should be done, then its up to you what you do.

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No I just did them up tight an i used the Haynes Manual , I was quoted over 300 quid to have it done an the parts cost me about 120 so a nice little saving

great job fella and a good saving you made there.

well done. :)

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Hi Ian, I've bought the cam belt kit from carparts4less. You give your car reg and they supply the correct product for your car, which is only one belt and an idler. I've had the cover off the timing belt, so I can say with some certainty that my 1.8 durotorq diesel engine has the one belt. It may well have a chain elsewhere, but my understanding is that this seldom needs changing unless the car has a particularly high mileage. The 1.6 is a different beast altogether, and looking at the Haynes manual, it seems far more difficult to deal with.

Barrymx5 From some research I think that what is mentioned above by iantt is correct about the 1.8 having 2 belts. (Timing Belt + Chain). Crankshaft and diesel injection pump are connected by a chain an then the diesel injection pump is connected to the camshaft by a timing belt.

I think after 2008 ford changed the chain to a belt known as a wet belt. Both version are changeable although the chain may last a lot longer but you would be safer maybe changing all when at it. I also think the 1.8 mondeo diesel engine had the same or similar set up. Just from memory but someone might be fit to give more details on it.
Hope this helps. :)
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Barrymx5 From some research I think that what is mentioned above by iantt is correct about the 1.8 having 2 belts. (Timing Belt + Chain). Crankshaft and diesel injection pump are connected by a chain an then the diesel injection pump is connected to the camshaft by a timing belt.

I think after 2008 ford changed the chain to a belt known as a wet belt. Both version are changeable although the chain may last a lot longer but you would be safer maybe changing all when at it. I also think the 1.8 mondeo diesel engine had the same or similar set up. Just from memory but someone might be fit to give more details on it.
Hope this helps. :)

mondeo, s max , galaxy , c max, Focus , transit connect,all the same 1.8 tdci.

later 1.8 does indeed have a wet belt that runs in engine oil, thats the belt ive seen broke, only saw the engine and not the car it came out of so dont know what the age range it was from, cant remember when they changed over to wet belt.but was told it was a transit connect and done 135k from what i remember

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mondeo, s max , galaxy , c max, focus , transit connect,all the same 1.8 tdci.

later 1.8 does indeed have a wet belt that runs in engine oil, thats the belt ive seen broke, only saw the engine and not the car it came out of so dont know what the age range it was from, cant remember when they changed over to wet belt.but was told it was a transit connect and done 135k from what i remember

so basically all the ford 1.8 tdci. engines had a belt and a chain or a belt and a wet-belt. You learn something new every day lol! :)

I also think most garages would of just changed the timing belt and forgot about the chain/wet-belt for whatever reason then so far down the line it may has give up so I think best advice is to change both at the same interval maybe to be safe. :)

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Yep, most don't realise they have the same change interval as the cam to injection pump belt , you probably would get away with the earlier chain version , but not the later wet belt, especially as the belt can deteriorate with the use of engine flushing agents that some use when changing oil

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But the 1.6 Tcdi only has one belt, right?

I'm getting the timing belt, aux belt and water pump done soon and this discussion shows that a bit of knowledge could help even if you don't do the job yourself - at least you are able to make sure the garage knows what they are doing before committing to them, or worse, finding out afterwards that they screwed up.

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mondeo, s max , galaxy , c max, focus , transit connect,all the same 1.8 tdci.

later 1.8 does indeed have a wet belt that runs in engine oil, thats the belt ive seen broke, only saw the engine and not the car it came out of so dont know what the age range it was from, cant remember when they changed over to wet belt.but was told it was a transit connect and done 135k from what i remember

have you seen any chains break or slip due to wear from the plastic tensioner on the chain 1.8 tdci engines? i've had the top timing belt changed at around 105k along with the water pump. Im on 145k and for around 10k miles now i hear a metallic rattling sound under load / over 2k revs which is coming from that area, i havent had the chance to have a good look as i need one person to look while another revs the engine. i think its possibly the ac compressor/idler/crankshaft pulley

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nope, not seen any chain issues, if you have noises from that area, just remove the auxillary belt and that will confirm either engine noise or aircon, alternator , pulley noises.

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nope, not seen any chain issues, if you have noises from that area, just remove the auxillary belt and that will confirm either engine noise or aircon, alternator , pulley noises.

Thanks yeah i will try that

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