Jump to content


Show
Photo

S-Max Running Temperature?


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#16 jeebowhite

jeebowhite

    Resident Loon

  • Super Mod
  • 16,086 posts
  • Name: James
  • Ford Model: Sea Grey Mondeo MKIV 1.8TDCi 140ps Zetec
  • Year: 2007
  • Location: Kent
Contributor

Posted 19 June 2014 - 03:20 PM

My mistake, thanks for clearing it up foca ☺

Sent from my MY SAGA C2 using Ford OC mobile app

Have something to contribute?

Sign in or register to start a topic...

Sign up to FOC Premium Membership To Remove These Ads

#17 Meerkatonacid

Meerkatonacid

    Member

  • Budding Enthusiast
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Name: Gary
  • Ford Model: S-MAX
  • Year: 2006
  • Location: Lincolnshire

Posted 19 June 2014 - 03:29 PM

Its normally the reverse of this - the heat that is taken out of the AC system has to be dissapated ( its a heat exchanger

  the cabin gets colder, the heat that is sucked out has to go somewhere) it is normally dumped in front of the engine radiator, raising the engine temp, not reducing it, thats why the fan comes on when the AC is switched on

 

Modern cars may run cooler due to emmisions/ economy - deisels normally run hotter  than petrol-engined cars, on both, there is an optimum temperature for economy, and optimum temp for emmisions, and an optimum temp for performance, the running temp is often  compromise between this, though emmisions/ economy are high priorities these days

 

To give you and example, some  truck owners were fitting special thermostats to their diesel trucks to get better economy, at the expense of some performance

Hi FOCA

Will see what temp gauge does on way to work which is mostly motorway but in the few days i have had it the running temp on gauge is around 75-76 but with a/c on it drops every so slightly to 74. Needle raises to 90 in traffic if stationary but does not go past this point. No point in my paying out for new thermostat if not needed. I will try some combinations tomorrow and post again.



#18 Meerkatonacid

Meerkatonacid

    Member

  • Budding Enthusiast
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Name: Gary
  • Ford Model: S-MAX
  • Year: 2006
  • Location: Lincolnshire

Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:09 PM

Its normally the reverse of this - the heat that is taken out of the AC system has to be dissapated ( its a heat exchanger

  the cabin gets colder, the heat that is sucked out has to go somewhere) it is normally dumped in front of the engine radiator, raising the engine temp, not reducing it, thats why the fan comes on when the AC is switched on

 

Modern cars may run cooler due to emmisions/ economy - deisels normally run hotter  than petrol-engined cars, on both, there is an optimum temperature for economy, and optimum temp for emmisions, and an optimum temp for performance, the running temp is often  compromise between this, though emmisions/ economy are high priorities these days

 

To give you and example, some  truck owners were fitting special thermostats to their diesel trucks to get better economy, at the expense of some performance

So 20 degrees here today and driving at 65mph for about 40 minutes on motorway. 

A/c on and blowing out nice and chilled air-Needle about 74

Heating off completely-Needle on about 78/79

Heating on with hot air-Needle about 78/79

Stuck in traffic needle rises to about 89 and no further so not overheating

Tried the test as mentioned above having driven for an hour and test showed temp as 78 which is about what needle is showing on dash when driving



#19 jeebowhite

jeebowhite

    Resident Loon

  • Super Mod
  • 16,086 posts
  • Name: James
  • Ford Model: Sea Grey Mondeo MKIV 1.8TDCi 140ps Zetec
  • Year: 2007
  • Location: Kent
Contributor

Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:25 PM

very odd! but the main thing is that despite its odd charecteristic, its still at least working.



#20 Meerkatonacid

Meerkatonacid

    Member

  • Budding Enthusiast
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts
  • Name: Gary
  • Ford Model: S-MAX
  • Year: 2006
  • Location: Lincolnshire

Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:38 PM

very odd! but the main thing is that despite its odd charecteristic, its still at least working.

Odd as in "I would get it done" or "Odd but still working at leave it"
Quoted £120 to supply and fit new thermostat with housing or mobile mechanic will do it for £65 all
In

#21 jeebowhite

jeebowhite

    Resident Loon

  • Super Mod
  • 16,086 posts
  • Name: James
  • Ford Model: Sea Grey Mondeo MKIV 1.8TDCi 140ps Zetec
  • Year: 2007
  • Location: Kent
Contributor

Posted 20 June 2014 - 08:51 PM

I would say save your £65 for when its needed!

 

its not overheating, its managing itself quite well, so just leave it as is :)



#22 FOCA

FOCA

    Feet on the table

  • True Ford Enthusiast
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,710 posts
  • Name: FOCA
  • Ford Model: Mondeo Mk3 Sleeper 194 flb.p.t.
  • Year: Non
  • Location: Scotland
Contributor

Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:28 PM

Hi FOCA

Will see what temp gauge does on way to work which is mostly motorway but in the few days i have had it the running temp on gauge is around 75-76 but with a/c on it drops every so slightly to 74. Needle raises to 90 in traffic if stationary but does not go past this point. No point in my paying out for new thermostat if not needed. I will try some combinations tomorrow and post again.

This is because the radiator fan comes on when the A/C is switched on,  when i had my AC removed (for better performance/ economy, it weighs 11kilos and puts a significant load on the engine) i noticed the engine ran cooler,  The AC sucks the heat out of the cabin and dumps it into the AC radiator that sits in front of the main radiator, heating up the engine more  (on a Mondeo, and most Fords i am aware of) - design-wise, its not ideal, as the AC is liable to be used in hot weather, but as the AC radiator is almost as big as the main radiator, there is not much space for it elsewhere, ideally it should be completely seperate from the main radiator

 

If you turn the heater up, (as hot as it can go, fan(s) fully up) this will cool the engine, the heater acts as a secondary radiator (you get hotter, the engine gets cooler) ok, not very comfortable, but useful to know in emergencies

 

Remember that any changes you make, the cooling system will try to compensate for/ attempt to stabilise the temperature

 

Another point worth mentioning  is the temp gauge (+ ECU temp sensor) may be connected directly to the metal of the head, not the coolant, (most modern cars are like this now- its for fuel/air ratio/ emmision reasons) so the coolant may be at a different temp or be going up/down at different rates from  from the gauge

 

In the winter it will probably be a different story (may take ages/ be difficult to warm up, or to even get heat out of the heater) - its easy to forget the difference the outside temp makes to a car 

 

  Anything up to 95 degrees centigrade is ok, under the pressurised system the boiling point of the coolant is about 110 degrees C (off the top of my head) so i agree with James, as well to leave it as it is - if it goes seriously wrong and overheats, the ECU will detect this and try to compensate, probably by backing off the power, so you should be safe         



#23 FOCA

FOCA

    Feet on the table

  • True Ford Enthusiast
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,710 posts
  • Name: FOCA
  • Ford Model: Mondeo Mk3 Sleeper 194 flb.p.t.
  • Year: Non
  • Location: Scotland
Contributor

Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:36 PM

So 20 degrees here today and driving at 65mph for about 40 minutes on motorway. 

A/c on and blowing out nice and chilled air-Needle about 74

Heating off completely-Needle on about 78/79

Heating on with hot air-Needle about 78/79

Stuck in traffic needle rises to about 89 and no further so not overheating

Tried the test as mentioned above having driven for an hour and test showed temp as 78 which is about what needle is showing on dash when driving

Its interesting how much it rises in traffic (but still ok, as you said) - as you probably know this is because you dont have the cooling effect of the rush of air going into the radiator/ engine bay that you get when the car is moving, + an un-vented engine bay can act as an oven, with just the fan to draw air across the radiator  

 

As above Needle gauge may be the metal in the head, not the coolant

 

Yes, agree with James,-  ok for now



Have something to contribute?

Sign in or register to start a topic...


Not what you're looking for?

Register now, we have a huge community of enthusiasts to answer any questions you might have



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users